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post #21391 of 53862
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Davosometime ago I said I’d do a thing on cufflinks. I was too busy – a week or so ago I was sipping a ( well several) Glenlivet Single Malt I’d been given and I tickled the keys and came up with this – I’ve meant to refine and edit it but I think posting now might be more useful. Too often the quest for perfection block the good enough.
Cufflinks are a relatively recent addition to men’s clothing. Probably came into widespread use in the mid 1800s with the advent of industrialisation or machining. Widespread not including the poor - which means most people. Previously the average bloke would wear a rough linen or rough cotton pop over shirt and it was considered underwear. It would be washed ever now and then or weekly or so- whether it was needed to be washed or not. The elite or wealthier would have various finer linen or silk or cotton but often with ruffles and frills on the cuffs – the elite weren’t all that much cleaner than the plebs. One of Brummell’s contributions, not much mentioned is that he took some pride in grooming and cleanliness. A radical thing to do. It took buttons and the gradual elimination of ruffles / frills to enable cufflinks to come into their own.
Initially cuffs were just fastened by whatever was used as buttons or fasteners. Mostly string or bits of ribboned material were used to fasten shirts at the front and cuffs. . It’s not a big step to see then how silk knots were used. (These days silk knots generally just refers to knots of material not necessarily or even mostly made of silk). The cufflink is a kind of coming together of the trends to the shirt being slightly less like underwear, cleanliness, and a combination of jewellery / broaches and the silk knot, and the decline of ruffles/ frills.
Compared to ruffles on the cuff, the double cuff/ folded cuff/ French Cuff is a simple and uncomplicated thing. It was held together by silk knots or metal bits usually held together by a chain link arrangement.
Again – if the cuff is to show and have some jewellery – the cufflink – to both be practical and hold it together and be an adornment or display of wealth and or taste then it had to be clean.
The cufflink should really have both sides for show. Not one side for show and one for utilitarian fastening.
However r- if you’ve ever tried to put a double sides chain linked cufflink through a double cuff in the morning in the dark and in a hurry you’ll appreciate why the ”modern” invention of the bar cufflink took off.
There are links that have double sides pressed together a bit like a press stud and I’ve found these aren’t to bad to put on.
There’s also the dumbell type link with a solid bar in between two well crafted ends – with the ”push through” end being slightly smaller to push through the button holes.
The cufflink is the one area where I – and many other men of taste – can tolerate the “joke” item. (On socks and ties the joke item marks you immediately as a man-boy never to be taken seriously and always to be kept a sharp eye on lest you start distributing pron by email, harassing women or simply being a total idiot in myriad other ways, whilst selling stock market tips, horse betting software,” investment “gold coast apartments, happy clappy Hillsong “church” or Amway. The only joke with joke ties and socks is on the wearer.)
As long as it’s not overly large the joke or quirky cufflink can work. The smaller and more subtle the better.
Over the years there have been many interesting little inventions to make the cufflink look good on both sides and also easy to put on.
The common bar with hinged back swivel bar link has won out.
Traditionally the cufflink should be small and not to ostentatious. In various periods – one we have experience of the 70s in particular - this small and discreet look was abandoned – with some success in my mind. Some great 70s cufflinks with the stirrup chain are available at sensible prices for the collector.
Traditionally it was gold for day wear and silver for after dark. But silver (colour not the precious metal) works in all situations and it the best all round colour. Plain and small works well always.
Me I find it difficult to wear cufflinks without a suit or at the least a jacket.. And often it seems a bit to much even with a suit. Cufflinks in my mind don’t work all that well with a sport coat. Except maybe “silk knots” which are often of course elastic knots these days.
The English are comfortable with the double folded cuff/ French cuff – they will wear it any where and everywhere – with a country sport coat, and without a jacket and even {gasp} without a tie.
Our American brothers strangely see the double cuff and cufflinks as suspect. Homosexual even. Non macho. Or dandy and European. Perhaps the same thing as homosexual in American eyes. The American male mainly only considers cufflinks and double cuffs with a Dinner Suit (or as they so quaintly call it “a Tuxedo”. Certainly in USA to wear cufflinks and double cuffs with a business suit is seen as pushing the envelope a bit. A very un-American habit.
Here in oz we seem to have more of the English approach and a double cuff and cufflink will rarely raise an eyebrow even in a “creative agency” or call centre.
No one here minds if you wear an open necked shirt with cufflinks. I don’t like it – but there you go – its not the worst sartorial in you can commit.
For me – its cufflinks usually only with a suit and tie {as an aside the term suit automatically accompanies tie – is the tie that needs to be documented} occasionally I can wear a cufflink – usually material knots with sports jacket, rarely without a tie. But lets face it because we aren’t as uptight as the Americans we all have the odd pink checked or striped shirt with double cuffs – so knots and simple plain links are a must.
Davo
I only noticed your website – I deliberately haven looked at it yet. So I’m not sure if I have offended you or not.
Here’s what I think I think
Australians are more like the English when it comes to cufflinks – comfortable with them in all kinds of situations. Open necked without tie, ( can you be opened necked with tie ? I suppose so) and also with out jacket. With sports coats and with suits.
People on forums like rules and lists;
Mine
Cufflinks should be double sided
Cufflinks should be small and simple
Silver (aluminium, stainless steel burnished or shiney etc) is for once better and more versatile than gold
to be worked up

What a great post fxh. Thanks for that.

Reminds me, I've been scouring op shops and ebay lately for vintage cufflinks. Here are some finds.

8186845413_4de14be741_z.jpg

Top left group L-R:
Taxco Mexico Silver with Mayan calendar design
Cartier logo links
9 ct gold with crystals

Bottom left group L-R:
Carnelian double-sided
Dumbbell links with glass inset
Sterling silver with unidentified stone (topaz, maybe?)

Right group T-B:
Gilt and enamel Art Deco
2 pairs of fabric links
Silvertone with unidentified stone
post #21392 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

People on forums like rules and lists;
Mine
Cufflinks should be double sided
Cufflinks should be small and simple
Silver (aluminium, stainless steel burnished or shiney etc) is for once better and more versatile than gold
to be worked up

 

Makes me glad I just got these:

 

post #21393 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by California Dreamer View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
 
What a great post fxh. Thanks for that.
Reminds me, I've been scouring op shops and ebay lately for vintage cufflinks. Here are some finds.
8186845413_4de14be741_z.jpg
Top left group L-R:
Taxco Mexico Silver with Mayan calendar design
Cartier logo links
9 ct gold with crystals
Bottom left group L-R:
Carnelian double-sided
Dumbbell links with glass inset
Sterling silver with unidentified stone (topaz, maybe?)
Right group T-B:
Gilt and enamel Art Deco
2 pairs of fabric links
Silvertone with unidentified stone

 

Great finds, CD!

post #21394 of 53862
FXH's rules:

People on forums like rules and lists;
Mine
Cufflinks should be double sided
Cufflinks should be small and simple
Silver (aluminium, stainless steel burnished or shiney etc) is for once better and more versatile than gold
to be worked up


Essentially describe all of Kent Wang's cufflinks. Which is lucky because those are what I wear! I think I might order those metal knots tonight.... Got a store credit there that has been burning a hole in my pocket...

Double cufflinks are time consuming to put in, no doubt, but after wearing them I can't go back to single sided.
post #21395 of 53862
speaking of, if you had to pick four pocket squares from here (assuming you didnt own any), what would they be?

White Linen + ?

http://www.kentwang.com/pocket-squares
post #21396 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by lachyzee View Post

speaking of, if you had to pick four pocket squares from here (assuming you didnt own any), what would they be?
White Linen + ?
http://www.kentwang.com/pocket-squares

White linen

White with blood edge

White with black edge

Blue Flower

 

The first three were the first three I got.

post #21397 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by lachyzee View Post

What do AE charge to ship direct?
I used to buy from endless.com which was excellent with their endless coupons and free shipping.
Now I am not sure - there is a seller in the sales section of SF who sells discounted AEs for about $270 for the common models, and he charges $45 shipping to Aus.

I think I paid around $50 for my last pair. Bought some Newmora dub monks that creased through the toe cap, I had worn them for a day, expressed my concern to AE and they exchanged them no questions asked (Walnut Strands). I then got some Lowndes from C & J and disappointedly so after a couple of wears are showing signs of the same (fit is spot on as I had them send a couple of pairs over). Might be inherent with the monks I think.
post #21398 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Davosometime ago I said I’d do a thing on cufflinks. I was too busy – a week or so ago I was sipping a ( well several) Glenlivet Single Malt I’d been given and I tickled the keys and came up with this – I’ve meant to refine and edit it but I think posting now might be more useful. Too often the quest for perfection block the good enough.
Cufflinks are a relatively recent addition to men’s clothing. Probably came into widespread use in the mid 1800s with the advent of industrialisation or machining. Widespread not including the poor - which means most people. Previously the average bloke would wear a rough linen or rough cotton pop over shirt and it was considered underwear. It would be washed ever now and then or weekly or so- whether it was needed to be washed or not. The elite or wealthier would have various finer linen or silk or cotton but often with ruffles and frills on the cuffs – the elite weren’t all that much cleaner than the plebs. One of Brummell’s contributions, not much mentioned is that he took some pride in grooming and cleanliness. A radical thing to do. It took buttons and the gradual elimination of ruffles / frills to enable cufflinks to come into their own.
Initially cuffs were just fastened by whatever was used as buttons or fasteners. Mostly string or bits of ribboned material were used to fasten shirts at the front and cuffs. . It’s not a big step to see then how silk knots were used. (These days silk knots generally just refers to knots of material not necessarily or even mostly made of silk). The cufflink is a kind of coming together of the trends to the shirt being slightly less like underwear, cleanliness, and a combination of jewellery / broaches and the silk knot, and the decline of ruffles/ frills.
Compared to ruffles on the cuff, the double cuff/ folded cuff/ French Cuff is a simple and uncomplicated thing. It was held together by silk knots or metal bits usually held together by a chain link arrangement.
Again – if the cuff is to show and have some jewellery – the cufflink – to both be practical and hold it together and be an adornment or display of wealth and or taste then it had to be clean.
The cufflink should really have both sides for show. Not one side for show and one for utilitarian fastening.
However r- if you’ve ever tried to put a double sides chain linked cufflink through a double cuff in the morning in the dark and in a hurry you’ll appreciate why the ”modern” invention of the bar cufflink took off.
There are links that have double sides pressed together a bit like a press stud and I’ve found these aren’t to bad to put on.
There’s also the dumbell type link with a solid bar in between two well crafted ends – with the ”push through” end being slightly smaller to push through the button holes.
The cufflink is the one area where I – and many other men of taste – can tolerate the “joke” item. (On socks and ties the joke item marks you immediately as a man-boy never to be taken seriously and always to be kept a sharp eye on lest you start distributing pron by email, harassing women or simply being a total idiot in myriad other ways, whilst selling stock market tips, horse betting software,” investment “gold coast apartments, happy clappy Hillsong “church” or Amway. The only joke with joke ties and socks is on the wearer.)
As long as it’s not overly large the joke or quirky cufflink can work. The smaller and more subtle the better.
Over the years there have been many interesting little inventions to make the cufflink look good on both sides and also easy to put on.
The common bar with hinged back swivel bar link has won out.
Traditionally the cufflink should be small and not to ostentatious. In various periods – one we have experience of the 70s in particular - this small and discreet look was abandoned – with some success in my mind. Some great 70s cufflinks with the stirrup chain are available at sensible prices for the collector.
Traditionally it was gold for day wear and silver for after dark. But silver (colour not the precious metal) works in all situations and it the best all round colour. Plain and small works well always.
Me I find it difficult to wear cufflinks without a suit or at the least a jacket.. And often it seems a bit to much even with a suit. Cufflinks in my mind don’t work all that well with a sport coat. Except maybe “silk knots” which are often of course elastic knots these days.
The English are comfortable with the double folded cuff/ French cuff – they will wear it any where and everywhere – with a country sport coat, and without a jacket and even {gasp} without a tie.
Our American brothers strangely see the double cuff and cufflinks as suspect. Homosexual even. Non macho. Or dandy and European. Perhaps the same thing as homosexual in American eyes. The American male mainly only considers cufflinks and double cuffs with a Dinner Suit (or as they so quaintly call it “a Tuxedo”. Certainly in USA to wear cufflinks and double cuffs with a business suit is seen as pushing the envelope a bit. A very un-American habit.
Here in oz we seem to have more of the English approach and a double cuff and cufflink will rarely raise an eyebrow even in a “creative agency” or call centre.
No one here minds if you wear an open necked shirt with cufflinks. I don’t like it – but there you go – its not the worst sartorial in you can commit.
For me – its cufflinks usually only with a suit and tie {as an aside the term suit automatically accompanies tie – is the tie that needs to be documented} occasionally I can wear a cufflink – usually material knots with sports jacket, rarely without a tie. But lets face it because we aren’t as uptight as the Americans we all have the odd pink checked or striped shirt with double cuffs – so knots and simple plain links are a must.
Davo
I only noticed your website – I deliberately haven looked at it yet. So I’m not sure if I have offended you or not.
Here’s what I think I think
Australians are more like the English when it comes to cufflinks – comfortable with them in all kinds of situations. Open necked without tie, ( can you be opened necked with tie ? I suppose so) and also with out jacket. With sports coats and with suits.
People on forums like rules and lists;
Mine
Cufflinks should be double sided
Cufflinks should be small and simple
Silver (aluminium, stainless steel burnished or shiney etc) is for once better and more versatile than gold
to be worked up

   

 

A GREAT history and article generally....  erudite - as usual - fxh! 

 

 (that Glenlivet S pretty good muse eh!....me? has to be brandy/cognac ...despite the olde ancestors  from the western isles.... scotch=headache, alas...then heartache)

 

fx old sport....would there be any copyright probs ...with me quoting some of this on my site?

 

I must be one of the few designers pretty much specialising in cufflinks....making a bit of a thing too with personalising/engraving...rather old fashioned..but - I hope & it would seem - timeless.

 

I'm always open to new ideas from SFers that would complement my range....and generally find a market...keeping in mind that my stuff is pretty much based on (lost wax) cast sterling silver and carated golds  (v occasionally platinum)  I don't do really fancy gems /bling etc.

 

I have some double sided designs ready to go into production...smallish seed/shield shape (ie pointy oblong) with twisted sterling wire link (easier to use than chain).  These will be available in Stg Silver and solid 9Ct Gold (maybe even trial gold on one side - and silver on the other) possibly in brushed  - as well as polished finish.   the idea being classy smallish everyday wear - with some modernity of shape.

 

( I'll put up some sketches of  soon - for comment)

 

 

Cheers...


Edited by davodiva - 11/15/12 at 2:57pm
post #21399 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Davosometime ago I said I’d do a thing on cufflinks. I......
Australians are more like the English when it comes to cufflinks – comfortable with them in all kinds of situations. Open necked without tie, ( can you be opened necked with tie ? I suppose so) and also with out jacket. With sports coats and with suits.
People on forums like rules and lists;
Mine
Cufflinks should be double sided
Cufflinks should be small and simple
Silver (aluminium, stainless steel burnished or shiney etc) is for once better and more versatile than gold
to be worked up

Good read as usual fxh.

 

Thought Id share my little cuffs secret with you.

 

All my cuffs come from here -http://www.kjdjewellers.com/

 

They are all double sided and I buy myself 2 a year as a treat.  They are very beautifully made and come in some exquisite designs.  

 

The service from TOYE / KJD is first class and they send me the updated catalogue regularly.

 

I have one small admission to make however, I saw these double cuffs in the American Tailor in Burke Street years ago, bought a pair and then sourced them for a lot less straight from the manufacturer in .... um, Birmingham I think they are made.  For the price I parted coin with Sebastion for I could have bought two from the manufacturer.

 

Anyway, I would encourage any of you who are looking at quality cuffs to download the catalogue and trawl through it, you wont be disapointed.  I often receive compliments in mine, mainly because I mostly wear a white shirt each day and these cuffs really make a statement, although very conservatively beautiful.  

 

Goos article fxh, thanks for taking the time.

post #21400 of 53862
FYI, PRL Sale:

http://node3.au.trclient.com/4300/content/SS12/1211/rl_private/index.html
post #21401 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windowpane1967 View Post

Good read as usual fxh.

Thought Id share my little cuffs secret with you.

All my cuffs come from here -http://www.kjdjewellers.com/

They are all double sided and I buy myself 2 a year as a treat.  They are very beautifully made and come in some exquisite designs.  


I've seen KJDs in American Tailors, they're nice but were quite big.

I don't see double sided in their catalogue - is that a special order/extra cost?

My mistake, there are indeed a few.
post #21402 of 53862
Quote:

Thanks for the post Lachyzee.  Was in there on the weekend.  Couldn't part with a single coin despite a willingness.  I cannot wait until someone who knows what they are doing with the license takes it over from Oroton. The PRL in BNE is full of rubbish, absolute crap at exorbitant prices.  I wouldn't waste my time even if they are on sale they still hugely overpriced.  Heaps and Heaps of better options that PRL under its current distribution.  Any wonder Oroton lost it.  Collins Street may be the go, it seems marginally better.

post #21403 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by lachyzee View Post


I've seen KJDs in American Tailors, they're nice but were quite big.
I don't see double sided in their catalogue - is that a special order/extra cost?
My mistake, there are indeed a few.

Very nicely finished Lachyzee, something youd have for a lifetime I think.  The ones I have are all classic designs so they easy to match up.  The ones remaining in American Tailors (as of last week anyway) were all the T Bars, I dont recall seeing any double sided ones.

post #21404 of 53862

Wouldnt exactly say they big!!!  Seems nice size to me, not too small, certainly not too big

 

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/SUPERB-KJD-SIGNED-SS-GOLD-PLATED-FISH-HOOK-BLUE-ENAMEL-OVAL-SHAPED-CUFF-LINKS-/271065235640?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f1cbf40b8

 

Only one pair on FleaBay, thought there may have been a couple more.  These ones aren't exactly my cup of tea.  Maybe Charlie or the other fishers' amongst us.

post #21405 of 53862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Windowpane1967 View Post

Thanks for the post Lachyzee.  Was in there on the weekend.  Couldn't part with a single coin despite a willingness.  I cannot wait until someone who knows what they are doing with the license takes it over from Oroton. The PRL in BNE is full of rubbish, absolute crap at exorbitant prices.  I wouldn't waste my time even if they are on sale they still hugely overpriced.  Heaps and Heaps of better options that PRL under its current distribution.  Any wonder Oroton lost it.  Collins Street may be the go, it seems marginally better.

 

I was actually hoping to buy some casual shirts, chinos and polo shirts from RL. I should steer clear?

 

Quote:

Cheers Lachyzee

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