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post #21361 of 53498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry Nelson View Post

Anyone who's still after the Henry Carter navy grenadine can get one from Ludlows - they still had two or three left when I went by. Not sure how much longer they'll be there though.

Get on that! HC ties are rockin'
post #21362 of 53498
There is Ettinger kit on Pediwear as well.
post #21363 of 53498
That Indochino review is interesting. It sounds like a very slick operation - that is going to be the way forward for many e-commerce/grey import sites. A bare bones show room where you can check out their products, then you pay for your order and it is shipped from overseas and arrives in a few weeks.

I can't help but feel that they have chosen their company's name poorly, though. We have debated this issue quite a few times on here and I don't want to start it up again, but, like it or not, "Indo" and "Chin(a)o" both have negative connotations with regard to quality in the minds of many consumers, and I imagine that this feeling is made even stronger when they are combined... Having said that, they have been quite successful so far.
post #21364 of 53498
Any Sydney-siders coming to the Polo on Sat? Should be a great showing of peacock attire
post #21365 of 53498
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaypee View Post

Any Sydney-siders coming to the Polo on Sat? Should be a great showing of peacock attire

Went to the polo at Werribee Park last weekend, very relaxed (just took a picnic) and had a great day. Not often I get to wear my Panama hat (incidentally it definitely ages me when I wear it, but not necessary in a bad way...if that makes any sense).
post #21366 of 53498
Quote:
Originally Posted by lachyzee View Post

That Indochino review is interesting. It sounds like a very slick operation - that is going to be the way forward for many e-commerce/grey import sites. A bare bones show room where you can check out their products, then you pay for your order and it is shipped from overseas and arrives in a few weeks.
I can't help but feel that they have chosen their company's name poorly, though. We have debated this issue quite a few times on here and I don't want to start it up again, but, like it or not, "Indo" and "Chin(a)o" both have negative connotations with regard to quality in the minds of many consumers, and I imagine that this feeling is made even stronger when they are combined... Having said that, they have been quite successful so far.

You're probably well aware of this already, but Indochina (or Indochine in French) was the French colonial name for its South-East Asian colonies of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Interestingly, the name came about because Indochina was in between India and China.

However, it's possible that has nothing to do with why Indochino chose such a similar name for itself.

Anyway, I think that the model of visiting a showroom, trying on a stock suit in one of a variety of fits, and then having the measurements tweaked is an interesting one (and is actually a bit similar to the model that Herringbone appears to use for its MTO operation). It would, hopefully, help to avoid many of the catastrophes that we see in the threads for online MTO clothing, such as those for Indochino and the so-called Elite Tailors.
post #21367 of 53498
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Get on that! HC ties are rockin'

i just ordered a bowtie from Jason! cant fricken wait icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #21368 of 53498
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmills View Post

I haven't got all the deets yet, but I decided to start with a conservative two-button suit, made from a nice navy tropical. I opted for natural shoulder and wide lapels, horn buttons and burgundy lining, double vents and flap pockets. Also coughed up for extra pair of trou, they have slightly lower rise than normal, side tabs and big cuffs.

 

Tom is a really pleasant guy to work with, and very skilled.

Let us know how much it comes to all up and, in particular, how much the extra pants cost.

post #21369 of 53498
Question: I've a linen jacket (part of a linen suit) with no chest pocket (posted about it before). My tailor is able to create a pocket from excess material from the pant cuff.

However the cost is $90 as it is quite a labour intensive job. Worth it or no? All up the cost of alternations is $180. Not including the pocket its $90.
post #21370 of 53498
B. Bear - I'd say that it's worth it, as I wouldn't wear an odd jacket without a breast pocket.

If you don't really mind not having a breast pocket, though, it might not be worth it.
post #21371 of 53498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

B. Bear - I'd say that it's worth it, as I wouldn't wear an odd jacket without a breast pocket.
If you don't really mind not having a breast pocket, though, it might not be worth it.

It's part of a linen suit but I'm intending to wear it as an odd jacket as well. I'll have a chat to my tailor.
post #21372 of 53498
Davosometime ago I said I’d do a thing on cufflinks. I was too busy – a week or so ago I was sipping a ( well several) Glenlivet Single Malt I’d been given and I tickled the keys and came up with this – I’ve meant to refine and edit it but I think posting now might be more useful. Too often the quest for perfection block the good enough.

Cufflinks are a relatively recent addition to men’s clothing. Probably came into widespread use in the mid 1800s with the advent of industrialisation or machining. Widespread not including the poor - which means most people. Previously the average bloke would wear a rough linen or rough cotton pop over shirt and it was considered underwear. It would be washed ever now and then or weekly or so- whether it was needed to be washed or not. The elite or wealthier would have various finer linen or silk or cotton but often with ruffles and frills on the cuffs – the elite weren’t all that much cleaner than the plebs. One of Brummell’s contributions, not much mentioned is that he took some pride in grooming and cleanliness. A radical thing to do. It took buttons and the gradual elimination of ruffles / frills to enable cufflinks to come into their own.

Initially cuffs were just fastened by whatever was used as buttons or fasteners. Mostly string or bits of ribboned material were used to fasten shirts at the front and cuffs. . It’s not a big step to see then how silk knots were used. (These days silk knots generally just refers to knots of material not necessarily or even mostly made of silk). The cufflink is a kind of coming together of the trends to the shirt being slightly less like underwear, cleanliness, and a combination of jewellery / broaches and the silk knot, and the decline of ruffles/ frills.
Compared to ruffles on the cuff, the double cuff/ folded cuff/ French Cuff is a simple and uncomplicated thing. It was held together by silk knots or metal bits usually held together by a chain link arrangement.
Again – if the cuff is to show and have some jewellery – the cufflink – to both be practical and hold it together and be an adornment or display of wealth and or taste then it had to be clean.
The cufflink should really have both sides for show. Not one side for show and one for utilitarian fastening.

However r- if you’ve ever tried to put a double sides chain linked cufflink through a double cuff in the morning in the dark and in a hurry you’ll appreciate why the ”modern” invention of the bar cufflink took off.
There are links that have double sides pressed together a bit like a press stud and I’ve found these aren’t to bad to put on.

There’s also the dumbell type link with a solid bar in between two well crafted ends – with the ”push through” end being slightly smaller to push through the button holes.

The cufflink is the one area where I – and many other men of taste – can tolerate the “joke” item. (On socks and ties the joke item marks you immediately as a man-boy never to be taken seriously and always to be kept a sharp eye on lest you start distributing pron by email, harassing women or simply being a total idiot in myriad other ways, whilst selling stock market tips, horse betting software,” investment “gold coast apartments, happy clappy Hillsong “church” or Amway. The only joke with joke ties and socks is on the wearer.)

As long as it’s not overly large the joke or quirky cufflink can work. The smaller and more subtle the better.

Over the years there have been many interesting little inventions to make the cufflink look good on both sides and also easy to put on.

The common bar with hinged back swivel bar link has won out.

Traditionally the cufflink should be small and not to ostentatious. In various periods – one we have experience of the 70s in particular - this small and discreet look was abandoned – with some success in my mind. Some great 70s cufflinks with the stirrup chain are available at sensible prices for the collector.
Traditionally it was gold for day wear and silver for after dark. But silver (colour not the precious metal) works in all situations and it the best all round colour. Plain and small works well always.

Me I find it difficult to wear cufflinks without a suit or at the least a jacket.. And often it seems a bit to much even with a suit. Cufflinks in my mind don’t work all that well with a sport coat. Except maybe “silk knots” which are often of course elastic knots these days.
The English are comfortable with the double folded cuff/ French cuff – they will wear it any where and everywhere – with a country sport coat, and without a jacket and even {gasp} without a tie.

Our American brothers strangely see the double cuff and cufflinks as suspect. Homosexual even. Non macho. Or dandy and European. Perhaps the same thing as homosexual in American eyes. The American male mainly only considers cufflinks and double cuffs with a Dinner Suit (or as they so quaintly call it “a Tuxedo”. Certainly in USA to wear cufflinks and double cuffs with a business suit is seen as pushing the envelope a bit. A very un-American habit.

Here in oz we seem to have more of the English approach and a double cuff and cufflink will rarely raise an eyebrow even in a “creative agency” or call centre.
No one here minds if you wear an open necked shirt with cufflinks. I don’t like it – but there you go – its not the worst sartorial in you can commit.

For me – its cufflinks usually only with a suit and tie {as an aside the term suit automatically accompanies tie – is the tie that needs to be documented} occasionally I can wear a cufflink – usually material knots with sports jacket, rarely without a tie. But lets face it because we aren’t as uptight as the Americans we all have the odd pink checked or striped shirt with double cuffs – so knots and simple plain links are a must.

Davo
I only noticed your website – I deliberately haven looked at it yet. So I’m not sure if I have offended you or not.

Here’s what I think I think
Australians are more like the English when it comes to cufflinks – comfortable with them in all kinds of situations. Open necked without tie, ( can you be opened necked with tie ? I suppose so) and also with out jacket. With sports coats and with suits.

People on forums like rules and lists;
Mine
Cufflinks should be double sided
Cufflinks should be small and simple
Silver (aluminium, stainless steel burnished or shiney etc) is for once better and more versatile than gold

to be worked up
post #21373 of 53498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prof. B. Bear View Post

Question: I've a linen jacket (part of a linen suit) with no chest pocket (posted about it before). My tailor is able to create a pocket from excess material from the pant cuff.
However the cost is $90 as it is quite a labour intensive job. Worth it or no? All up the cost of alternations is $180. Not including the pocket its $90.

Save the $90
post #21374 of 53498
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romp View Post

Whoever was talking about online delivery fees (Dart?) you may find this chart interesting from the Australian Centre of Retail Studies on Australian attitudes to shipping costs on a $100 item.

700

Interesting Romp, thanks. Do you have anything that shoes what I was discussing earlier with a split between absorbed and non-absorbed shipping?

post #21375 of 53498
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

Davo – sometime ago I said I’d do a thing on cufflinks. I was too busy – a week or so ago I was sipping a ( well several) Glenlivet Single Malt I’d been given and I tickled the keys and came up with this – I’ve meant to refine and edit it but I think posting now might be more useful. Too often the quest for perfection block the good enough.
Cufflinks are a relatively recent addition to men’s clothing. Probably came into widespread use in the mid 1800s with the advent of industrialisation or machining. Widespread not including the poor - which means most people. Previously the average bloke would wear a rough linen or rough cotton pop over shirt and it was considered underwear. It would be washed ever now and then or weekly or so- whether it was needed to be washed or not. The elite or wealthier would have various finer linen or silk or cotton but often with ruffles and frills on the cuffs – the elite weren’t all that much cleaner than the plebs. One of Brummell’s contributions, not much mentioned is that he took some pride in grooming and cleanliness. A radical thing to do. It took buttons and the gradual elimination of ruffles / frills to enable cufflinks to come into their own.
Initially cuffs were just fastened by whatever was used as buttons or fasteners. Mostly string or bits of ribboned material were used to fasten shirts at the front and cuffs. . It’s not a big step to see then how silk knots were used. (These days silk knots generally just refers to knots of material not necessarily or even mostly made of silk). The cufflink is a kind of coming together of the trends to the shirt being slightly less like underwear, cleanliness, and a combination of jewellery / broaches and the silk knot, and the decline of ruffles/ frills.
Compared to ruffles on the cuff, the double cuff/ folded cuff/ French Cuff is a simple and uncomplicated thing. It was held together by silk knots or metal bits usually held together by a chain link arrangement.
Again – if the cuff is to show and have some jewellery – the cufflink – to both be practical and hold it together and be an adornment or display of wealth and or taste then it had to be clean.
The cufflink should really have both sides for show. Not one side for show and one for utilitarian fastening.
However r- if you’ve ever tried to put a double sides chain linked cufflink through a double cuff in the morning in the dark and in a hurry you’ll appreciate why the ”modern” invention of the bar cufflink took off.
There are links that have double sides pressed together a bit like a press stud and I’ve found these aren’t to bad to put on.
There’s also the dumbell type link with a solid bar in between two well crafted ends – with the ”push through” end being slightly smaller to push through the button holes.
The cufflink is the one area where I – and many other men of taste – can tolerate the “joke” item. (On socks and ties the joke item marks you immediately as a man-boy never to be taken seriously and always to be kept a sharp eye on lest you start distributing pron by email, harassing women or simply being a total idiot in myriad other ways, whilst selling stock market tips, horse betting software,” investment “gold coast apartments, happy clappy Hillsong “church” or Amway. The only joke with joke ties and socks is on the wearer.)
As long as it’s not overly large the joke or quirky cufflink can work. The smaller and more subtle the better.
Over the years there have been many interesting little inventions to make the cufflink look good on both sides and also easy to put on.
The common bar with hinged back swivel bar link has won out.
Traditionally the cufflink should be small and not to ostentatious. In various periods – one we have experience of the 70s in particular - this small and discreet look was abandoned – with some success in my mind. Some great 70s cufflinks with the stirrup chain are available at sensible prices for the collector.
Traditionally it was gold for day wear and silver for after dark. But silver (colour not the precious metal) works in all situations and it the best all round colour. Plain and small works well always.
Me I find it difficult to wear cufflinks without a suit or at the least a jacket.. And often it seems a bit to much even with a suit. Cufflinks in my mind don’t work all that well with a sport coat. Except maybe “silk knots” which are often of course elastic knots these days.
The English are comfortable with the double folded cuff/ French cuff – they will wear it any where and everywhere – with a country sport coat, and without a jacket and even {gasp} without a tie.
Our American brothers strangely see the double cuff and cufflinks as suspect. Homosexual even. Non macho. Or dandy and European. Perhaps the same thing as homosexual in American eyes. The American male mainly only considers cufflinks and double cuffs with a Dinner Suit (or as they so quaintly call it “a Tuxedo”. Certainly in USA to wear cufflinks and double cuffs with a business suit is seen as pushing the envelope a bit. A very un-American habit.
Here in oz we seem to have more of the English approach and a double cuff and cufflink will rarely raise an eyebrow even in a “creative agency” or call centre.
No one here minds if you wear an open necked shirt with cufflinks. I don’t like it – but there you go – its not the worst sartorial in you can commit.
For me – its cufflinks usually only with a suit and tie {as an aside the term suit automatically accompanies tie – is the tie that needs to be documented} occasionally I can wear a cufflink – usually material knots with sports jacket, rarely without a tie. But lets face it because we aren’t as uptight as the Americans we all have the odd pink checked or striped shirt with double cuffs – so knots and simple plain links are a must.
Davo
I only noticed your website – I deliberately haven looked at it yet. So I’m not sure if I have offended you or not.
Here’s what I think I think
Australians are more like the English when it comes to cufflinks – comfortable with them in all kinds of situations. Open necked without tie, ( can you be opened necked with tie ? I suppose so) and also with out jacket. With sports coats and with suits.
People on forums like rules and lists;
Mine
Cufflinks should be double sided
Cufflinks should be small and simple
Silver (aluminium, stainless steel burnished or shiney etc) is for once better and more versatile than gold
to be worked up
 

 

Very information fxh. From what I understand, the French cuff in the US isn't just considered dandy, it's also seen as very elitist in some circles. Like something you don't do if you haven't "made it". Kind of like if you came across a 20 year old kid in a gold Rolex.

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