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Australian Members - Page 1002

post #15016 of 56052
So something like this?

City: Melbourne

Store: Rekaris Shoes and Repairs

Location: 168 Lonsdale Street Melbourne VIC 3000
(Soon to move to 290 Russell Street)

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/rekarisshoes/

Contact: (03) 9654 0178

Offerings: Expert repair of men’s and ladies footwear.
Repair of leather travel goods, including handles, locks and linings.

Brands: Small range of shoes for purchase, but mostly shoe repairs etc.

Comments: Family owned shoe repair business in Melbourne CBD. Knowledgeable and efficient service.
post #15017 of 56052
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

So something like this?
City: Melbourne
Store: Rekaris Shoes and Repairs
Location: 168 Lonsdale Street Melbourne VIC 3000
(Soon to move to 290 Russell Street)
Website: https://sites.google.com/site/rekarisshoes/
Contact: (03) 9654 0178
Offerings: Expert repair of men’s and ladies footwear.
Repair of leather travel goods, including handles, locks and linings.
Brands: Small range of shoes for purchase, but mostly shoe repairs etc.
Comments: Family owned shoe repair business in Melbourne CBD. Knowledgeable and efficient service.

The offerings/brands/comments should all be rolled into one comments field.
I also suggest having a category field, in this case 'shoe repairs'. That way when some kid asks about shoe repairs in melbourne, he knows where to look.

Also, there was a jantzen wiki a while ago. i imagine you can host a wiki for free pretty easily.
post #15018 of 56052
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Ernesto View Post

So something like this?

City: Melbourne

Store: Rekaris Shoes and Repairs

Location: 168 Lonsdale Street Melbourne VIC 3000
(Soon to move to 290 Russell Street)

Website: https://sites.google.com/site/rekarisshoes/

Contact: (03) 9654 0178

Offerings: Expert repair of men’s and ladies footwear.
Repair of leather travel goods, including handles, locks and linings.

Brands: Small range of shoes for purchase, but mostly shoe repairs etc.

Comments: Family owned shoe repair business in Melbourne CBD. Knowledgeable and efficient service.

I think it would be helpful to include indicative pricing and turnaround times. With alterations, for example, this can vary from 1-5 days between comparable tailors.

Can we include a Google map in the entries?
post #15019 of 56052
Also, an additional thought. As well as business-specific entries, it might be handy to have answers to where-can-I-buy questions such as who in Melbourne stocks Loakes, at what prices etc.
post #15020 of 56052
And we are live http://styleforumau.wikidot.com/

Its a free for all at the moment. Add in some content
post #15021 of 56052
Quote:
Originally Posted by fox81 View Post

The offerings/brands/comments should all be rolled into one comments field.
I also suggest having a category field, in this case 'shoe repairs'. That way when some kid asks about shoe repairs in melbourne, he knows where to look.
Also, there was a jantzen wiki a while ago. i imagine you can host a wiki for free pretty easily.

Thats what 'offerings' are - retail, hairdresser, shoe repairs etc
post #15022 of 56052
does anyone know how long herring take to reply? emailed them 3 days ago and still nothing - i want to make sure they have them in stock before i order. pediwear replied straight away, but they are not getting elland's in my size until september which is too late for when i need them.

also, thanks to whoever posted the shoe tree code.
post #15023 of 56052
Quote:
David Jones shares went into a trading halt, as it revealed the proposal was pulled by the British company EB Private Equity, which according to Fairfax has its office wedged between a wig shop and a noodle store in Newcastle, England.

EB Private Equity said that the recent publicity around its proposal made it too difficult to proceed.

It does seem David Jones kept the market informed of any developments following good corporate governance principles.

Surely the Australian Securities and Investments Commission will have to take a look at all the trades that were placed on Friday just to make sure everything lined up.

Can I say I told you so?
post #15024 of 56052
On the night of Fat Tony Mokbel's sentencing, as we reminisced, someone asked about IVY and swelled edges

487467349188400

Stealth dressing.
Smart not stiff, relaxed not sloppy, soft not weak, interesting not gimmicky, dressed up not formal, male not macho, different but subtle, tie or no tie, casual not careless.
Edited by fxh - 7/3/12 at 8:46pm
post #15025 of 56052
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

On the night of Fat Tony Mokbel's sentencing, as we reminisced, someone asked about IVY and swelled edges Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
487467349188400

So did you guys rock on afterwards?
post #15026 of 56052

Can anyone tell me what the style/material of the grey jacket (bottom right) is? I am trying to replace a similar jacket that i left in a night club and I am having next to no luck finding anything like it.

 

I found one from Brent Wilson but they were out of my size...

 

 

post #15027 of 56052
Sharpies

Blackburn South Sharps
http://issuu.com/hpdesign/docs/sharpies
http://www.abc.net.au/dimensions/dimensions_in_time/Transcripts/s508106.htm

A bit about the clothes from my perspective:


The cardigans tend to be held onto by old blokes still "livin tha dream" I've never seen repros.

Some were very tasty in the early days prior to the slide into shrunken washed look flavoured by yobs.

I used to have way back, a very nice maroon long sleeved cresknit polo witha broad stripe across the front chest. Some of this side of sharpies made its way to adults in the suburbs. Still a good look if you ask me.

Flags were wide straight legged high waisted pants worn by original sharpies. What made them different was that in the early days you could only get them by going to a tailor and getting a pair made. Later on there were small shops that sold some ready to wear and many of the tailors saw an opening and had a bunch of ready to wear in their shops.
Toward the end a few small chains and menswear shops stocked a variation of flags. Trouble was they weren't as well made, had inferior materials and lacked the spiffy details like back buckles belts and pocket flaps etc that real clothes nerds appreciate. The fashion soon died out as people grew up and moved on and especially as it was devalued by the violence of the younger yobs in jeans coming through and their ignorance about clothes.

As you can imagine many of those truly interested in clothes to go to tailors and spec up a pair of pants, plus go to a shoemaker and order their own design shoes, plus go to the cresknit factory and get a one off cardigan , are likely to carry on to suits and other stuff and not remain stuck in a youth culture forever.

What also made than different was they were always made out of heavy good quality suiting material. Im pretty sure it would be from standard tailors books at the time Holland and Sherry etc.

The most common and classic was a mid or charcoal grey witha chalk stripe. They were fitted around the bum, hips and waist and high waisted. They were straight down in that French manner. I can't find any reference but I'd guess the bottom cuff opening was 12 inches or even more. They flapped around as you walked hence "flags"

They were always cuff less and would have a slight break.

Worn with custom made square toed shoes from Venus or some other blokes. Shoes most often, but not always, had a platform sole. Nearly always the shoes had a high ish heel.

I was never a sharpie but I did have a pair of dark grey chalk striped flags made. Not too high waisted and not too wide. You can imagine it looks good with a dark maroon long sleeved polo with one broad chest stripe plus custom made shoes witha heel. Dressy and smarter than most people but with a fashion edge.
post #15028 of 56052
post #15029 of 56052
382Custom Cardigans - from Conte Bros Thornbury or Cresknit Preston - late 60s early 70s

526
Edited by fxh - 7/3/12 at 10:32pm
post #15030 of 56052
From an unknown forum poster on the times.
Quote:
In early 1968, when I was a 16-year-old “mod” working at the Melbourne GPO (post office), I became mates with a young lout from Preston. He had short hair and attitude! One lunchtime, he asked me if I wanted to come over to the “Seven Little Tailors” shop on Elizabeth street. He was getting some “flags” made.

Flags?” I thought. “What the hell!”

When we got there, i found out that “flags” were a necessary item of clothing worn by a Melbourne-based gang subculture called “sharpies”. They were trousers–baggy trousers–made of woollen material in “houndstooth” or check design with dull colours and rear pocket flaps. I was intrigued. I wanted to know more!

My new mate informed me that along with flags, they wore Italian fine knit cardigans and jumpers made by companies like “Venito”, no stripes, just plain colours usually maroon or bottle green. Mods were starting to sounds a bit “old hat” now. I was hooked! Italian leather shoes, chisel toe, cuban heel, were the other required items of clothing and a “Crestknit” polo shirt to top it off! Sharpie girls were called “brush” and wore fairly drab outfits compared to the boys: twin sets, plaint skirts, flat shoes, etc.

A few months later, i went to a dance on flinders lane called “Traffik” to see “The Loved Ones”. And who were hanging around outside, leaning on lowered “HD” and “EH” Holdens with “Tasman” mags? Sharpies! I later found out that most dances had “sharpie bans” so they would stay out the front “picking” the long hairs or trying to chat up some mod “chicks”. Fun!
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