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Australian Members - Page 914

post #13696 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

I agree. I've had luck in Frankston and many of the outer suburbs. Some friends and I often make a day of it and drive further to Mornington, for example, for lunch.
I've actually been in an op shop in Frankston and overheard someone say, "Aw fuck yeah, tracksuit pants, 2 bucks!". They probably think I'm a 'p**fta' for wanting to clear out the sportcoat section, but I'll glady take it! icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif

There's a relatively new vintage clothing store in Tyabb that has some very decent stuff, though it's a little more pricey, and probably about 80% womens stuff. My other half picked up a nice pair of black patent Ferragamo heels for about $40, and they have a couple of racks full of HEAVY Harris Tweed SC's as well in the mens section.

It's here:
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Tyabb,+Victoria,+Australia&hl=en&ll=-38.261997,145.176631&spn=0.001127,0.002089&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=37.188995,68.466797&oq=tyabb+&t=h&hnear=Tyabb+Victoria,+Australia&z=19
post #13697 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by kickstart View Post

FYI, on their Facebook page the other day they told another customer that they did not offer the Osaka in MTM.

Ah crap!

So much for that idea...
post #13698 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by tailoredstuff View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Plestor View Post

A)Spot clean if possible

B) Clean as required

C) Clean seasonally if relevant.

NB this is my dry cleaning routine for everything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasj View Post

Dry clean whenever I spill something on them, and otherwise not at all.

Been wearing a few pair for about half year and no dry clean.... just hang and air out.

When you take it to dry clean, do you ask that they don't use the chemicals? Just steam and press - thought I red this somewhere to extend the life of them =\

* I hand press as required at home if they go to the dry cleaners they need to be actually cleaned.
post #13699 of 53821
Should you use vinegar to get rid of the wool shine before or after taking it to the dry cleaners?
post #13700 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by blahman View Post

Should you use vinegar to get rid of the wool shine before or after taking it to the dry cleaners?

God there is literally nothing you can't do with vinegar.
post #13701 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasj View Post

God there is literally nothing you can't do with vinegar.

Is white vinegar also useful for getting the musty smell out of vintage clothing?

I've got some jackets that want to be worn this winter, but I don't want to stink out the joint..
post #13702 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Is white vinegar also useful for getting the musty smell out of vintage clothing?
I've got some jackets that want to be worn this winter, but I don't want to stink out the joint..

Air then and then put them back in closet with fresh lavender that works for me.
post #13703 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebrownman View Post

Is white vinegar also useful for getting the musty smell out of vintage clothing?
I've got some jackets that want to be worn this winter, but I don't want to stink out the joint..


Hang them outside in the breeze on hangers on a mild windy day. Not today when it's raining.
Or in too much direct sun.

Sometimes the smell is actually in the dust and other matter in the material , so a dry clean is often the best first step.

If that doesn't get rid of the smell then sprinkle them with bi carb powder and leave for a day then brush off.

If still there are problems then a bit of the old Nil Oder in discrete places like inside pockets lining, under arms etc can help.
post #13704 of 53821
I must admit fxh, you know stuff smile.gif
post #13705 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by tailoredstuff View Post



Been wearing a few pair for about half year and no dry clean.... just hang and air out.

When you take it to dry clean, do you ask that they don't use the chemicals? Just steam and press - thought I red this somewhere to extend the life of them =\

I think someone else has mentioned it. It usually when you take them to cleaners its to get them cleaned.

Mostly a good brush with clothes brush after each wear for wool, jackets and trousers. But who really does that. So just remember to do it every now and then.

Hang them out on line on hanger in light breeze for a few hours.

Hang them on hanger always. Shouldn't need saying but you'd be surprised how many people fold them or something.

For smallish stains and stuff, don't underestimate the old finger nail. A lot of stuff, like chocolate, sauces, will often just be on the surface and once it drys will scrape off witha bit of discrete fingernail scratching , even in a meeting. Or a nail brush. The old nail brush is useful for lots of things, like suede etc. It's a bit stiffer than a clothes brush, but not as stiff as wire. Similarly an old stiffer type toothbrush should always be on hand.

Bi carb soda is always useful to have. You can get bulk dry cleaning fluid, called white spirits, **at Bunnings cheap. Surely I needn't point out to use it carefully and after testing.

The theory is with moths that they only feed on the organic material like food etc in the fabric, not on the fabric itself. So dry cleaning at least once a year is important if you store stuff. All vintage stores drycleaner their stuff at least every year.

Whilst dry cleaning wool every two weeks or monthly will eventually rob it of life buy sucking out the natural "oils" dry cleaning more than once or twice a year is nothing to get worried about.

Naturally as a refined gentleman I would have no advice to give about how to get vomit out of clothes.

** this is useful for spot cleaning a small spot with a cotton bud .

Don't underestimate the usefulness of a bit of spit on a clean white hankie.
post #13706 of 53821
^ What I had recommended is to hang the suit in the bathroom and let it steam when your having a shower.

I was told by a rural woman that putting clothing out over night if you know there is a frost due will get perfidious odours out of garments. Does work tried it with jumpers a few times in the past.
post #13707 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geoffrey Firmin View Post

^ What I had recommended is to hang the suit in the bathroom and let it steam when your having a shower.
I was told by a rural woman that putting clothing out over night if you know there is a frost due will get perfidious odours out of garments. Does work tried it with jumpers a few times in the past.

One theory is that a lot of smells are caused by active bacteria. (I'm guessing inactive bacteria are dead or neutral) . So that the aim is to kill the little buggers. Often the treatment is to place the item, table clothe, curtain, cushion cover, jumper, jacket etc in a waterproof bag inside freezer for 24 hours or so.

Freezing works for chewing gum and wax amongst other things. Can work for chocolate and some fats.
post #13708 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by tobiasj View Post

I must admit fxh, you know stuff smile.gif

Even more accurately:: I know a lot more than I let on.
post #13709 of 53821
Quote:
Originally Posted by fxh View Post

One theory is that a lot of smells are caused by active bacteria. (I'm guessing inactive bacteria are dead or neutral) . So that the aim is to kill the little buggers. Often the treatment is to place the item, table clothe, curtain, cushion cover, jumper, jacket etc in a waterproof bag inside freezer for 24 hours or so.
Freezing works for chewing gum and wax amongst other things. Can work for chocolate and some fats.

I know from my Masters placement that museums in Australia when given garments and other fabric items freeze them for 48 hours to kill off any potential threat, bacteria, bugs before accessing them to a collection.

With gum the best way I found was to get an ice cube or pack and hold it on the offending site and then wait for it to go brittle and scrap it off.
post #13710 of 53821

I've often been searching the house for my jeans before remembering they are in the freezer. Pretty chilly putting them straight on.

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