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Did the STYLEman thread just vanish? - Page 13

post #181 of 227
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That sucks about your time at Cal.  UC Davis was a wonderful environment for learning.  When you were going to Cal, however, Davis was probably still an ag extension to Cal.  Maybe it also depended on which department you were in?
I actually spent time on both campuses. I agree with you: Davis was way better.
post #182 of 227
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(johnapril @ Feb. 25 2005,12:04) That sucks about your time at Cal.  UC Davis was a wonderful environment for learning.  When you were going to Cal, however, Davis was probably still an ag extension to Cal.  Maybe it also depended on which department you were in?
I actually spent time on both campuses.  I agree with you: Davis was way better.
Doesn't Davis have a rep nowadays as a Party Uni?
post #183 of 227
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I have (amazinly enough) reached the point where I may be thinking of universities more as a place to send  my children than as a place I can identify with - it concerns me that you send off children to universities, part of the experience of which needs to be gaining charactor and experience in life, and there seems to be an overwhelmingly one sided exposure to one particular political idea, often promoted by people who have lived very insular lives in the academic community.
That part about university being an overwhelmingly one-sided exposure to one particular political idea is a generalization.  There is variability within departments and across departments.  I know you like to make generalizations because it simplifies the world and makes it easy to write about, but that method of seeing the world only scratches at the truth. I had many sound teachers at uni, and we had many wonderful debates, and it was a good experience to gain exposure to all sides of arguments. You can take any experience and see as much or as little of it as you like. That said, most people at university are at an age where they are very impressionable and keen to experiment with all kinds of things.  Learning is one of them.  There is no hope in trying to hold kids back from this endeavor. Of course, once uni is over, those same kids are going to enter all kinds of environments that have all kinds of political bends and twists.  University is not a factory to produce a lot of Ann Coultures or Ralph Naders. All of these experiences people go through should not be judged as a series of problems.  But if you look at these experiences as problems, if you try to control your kid's experiences, you will undoubtedly be dissappointed.
post #184 of 227
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Doesn't Davis have a rep nowadays as a Party Uni?
I would be shocked. I suppose anything is possible. College students do tend to party wherever they are, after all, with some notable exceptions (U. of Chicago is famously staid, for instance). But Davis was not known for being a riotous place. Compared with, say, UCSB or Chico State.
post #185 of 227
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That part about university being an overwhelmingly one-sided exposure to one particular political idea is a generalization.
Yet I for one have found it be an amazingly accurate and predictive (and therefore most useful) generalization.
post #186 of 227
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That part about university being an overwhelmingly one-sided exposure to one particular political idea is a generalization.  There is variability within departments and across departments.  I know you like to make generalizations because it simplifies the world and makes it easy to write about, but that method of seeing the world only scratches at the truth.
So very very true... My time at Cal were extraordinary, wonderful..
post #187 of 227
I'm all for everyone having their own experience and living by it and preaching it. I'm not for anyone telling me what my experience is going to be or should be. Unless, of course, they are being forthright with me, admitting their personal bias, thus permitting an open debate. And to do that, they've got to know themselves and be comfortable with who they find and be able to admit that truth about themselves instead of hiding behind authority or a place of power. The crappiest teachers are the ones who are smart, and you know they have something to share, but they are not open to debate or discussion. It is as if, with some people, the experiment of life is over. Does that make sense?
post #188 of 227
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(globetrotter @ Feb. 25 2005,12:03) I have (amazinly enough) reached the point where I may be thinking of universities more as a place to send  my children than as a place I can identify with - it concerns me that you send off children to universities, part of the experience of which needs to be gaining charactor and experience in life, and there seems to be an overwhelmingly one sided exposure to one particular political idea, often promoted by people who have lived very insular lives in the academic community.
That part about university being an overwhelmingly one-sided exposure to one particular political idea is a generalization.  There is variability within departments and across departments.  I know you like to make generalizations because it simplifies the world and makes it easy to write about, but that method of seeing the world only scratches at the truth. I had many sound teachers at uni, and we had many wonderful debates, and it was a good experience to gain exposure to all sides of arguments. You can take any experience and see as much or as little of it as you like. That said, most people at university are at an age where they are very impressionable and keen to experiment with all kinds of things.  Learning is one of them.  There is no hope in trying to hold kids back from this endeavor. Of course, once uni is over, those same kids are going to enter all kinds of environments that have all kinds of political bends and twists.  University is not a factory to produce a lot of Ann Coultures or Ralph Naders. All of these experiences people go through should not be judged as a series of problems.  But if you look at these experiences as problems, if you try to control your kid's experiences, you will undoubtedly be dissappointed.
Johny, me? generalize? don't you know me better than that? I admit I have almost no experience with American campuses - my time at an american B school was spent in the role of an "external expert", not a student or teacher. from what I ahve heard, it seems to be one sided, and very shallow. not to turn this into a political issue, but the fact that a good and established university could celebrate the actions of a stupid little girl who got involved in helping terror organizations and got herself crushed by a tractor, and nobody in the academic world was there to sugest that maybe these types of activities should be avoided, strikes me as a good example.
post #189 of 227
I remember one afternoon during the first Gulf War an anti-war rally on campus at the same time as one of my English classes. Lots of students wanted to go to the rally, but that English teacher always had a quiz in his class (plus he was interesting and brilliant [Max Byrd]), and so you didn't want to ever skip his classes. He would not let students who skipped class make up the quiz, even when they pleaded that they skipped for the peace rally. Some tried to corner him, saying because of his unwillingness, he must be pro-war. He detected the faulty logic, and made an example of it. I thought the entire interaction was healthy and worth having.
post #190 of 227
At Berkeley, the teacher would have cancelled class so that everyone could go to the rally, and then flunked anyone who didn't show up.
post #191 of 227
Hope that your kids turn out to be hard scientists or engineers. Too much time spent working to get involved in political causes. Of course, we engineers are pragmatists by nature and not idealists, so it may be a question of self selection.
post #192 of 227
Well Kabbaz, I was at Berkeley for professional neurotic (er, law) school, so maybe not all that younger.
post #193 of 227
yes, Davis definitely has a "party school" reputation, but this is generally what comes with having a huge student population. I think the idea that some schools are party schools while others are not is pretty umm.. stupid. All schools have wild parties. I think people say it's a "party school" because it has a larger Greek presence on campus, as opposed to a campus like UCSD, where fraternity life is fairly subdued. I, however, am attending a school with quite the reputation for parties (we're in the Playboy top 10, above UCSB), and I attribute it to a disgustingly large Greek presence. I kind of cringe when people tell me "oooh, bet youre partyin it up down there?" when I tell them I go to SDSU. I'm getting an amazing education and immersing myself in the "real world," as high school teachers like to put it. But, yea, I am a college student, so party it is...
post #194 of 227
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Well Kabbaz, I was at Berkeley for professional neurotic (er, law) school, so maybe not all that younger.
"Boalt" man instead of RJman?
post #195 of 227
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(RJMan @ Feb. 25 2005,18:54) Well Kabbaz, I was at Berkeley for professional neurotic (er, law) school, so maybe not all that younger.
"Boalt" man instead of RJman?
"Berkeley"phage instead of "T4"phage?
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