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guide to touching up your suit without wrecking it - Page 11

post #151 of 172
Bump for a great thread!
post #152 of 172

Bump - a must read

post #153 of 172
Thread Starter 
I was browsing Put This On and came across another fine example of what can happen when you take a steamer to an otherwise innocent garment. The following is an Oxxford garment so we can be quite sure the bubbling has got nothing to do with fusing. This is the result of someone steaming the coat and pant. It ain't pretty.

post #154 of 172

Oh geez, poor suit.

post #155 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manton View Post

I recently tried this on a pair of pants. It works. No lie. Time consuming, especially if you have no experience. But effective.

While I am not anti-steam, I have to say, steam not only will not put the crease back in a trouser; it removes crease. The iron, OTOH, sets them very nicely.

 

This is an old post, but I have to +100000 to it. Even if you manage to put a crease on with steam, it won't last long. Sponge some moisture, then apply as much pressure as you can with the iron until it dries. Creases last forever that way.

post #156 of 172
I'm not a fan of the chemicals used in dry cleaning so I'm wondering if I can hand wash a suit jacket and pants myself and then have my tailor press them back into shape? Would this cause any issues other than the initial loss of shape in the garment prior to the re-pressing? Could shrinkage occur?
post #157 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

I was browsing Put This On and came across another fine example of what can happen when you take a steamer to an otherwise innocent garment. The following is an Oxxford garment so we can be quite sure the bubbling has got nothing to do with fusing. This is the result of someone steaming the coat and pant. It ain't pretty.



Surely there must be more to the story than simple steaming unless the guy using the steamer went hog wild or something? For example, I recently steamed several new pairs of my stepson's Lands' End "Year Rounder" trousers, which are certainly not the equals of Oxxford in quality and probably of a lighter fabric. There were no discernible ill effects, and the trousers looked fine after being given a night to rest.
post #158 of 172
lurker[1].gif
post #159 of 172
I've read this thread a few times now. Thanks, JefferyD. One question (and I hope it hasn't been answered and I've forgotten): Is there no risk that pressing worn clothes could set dirt and subtle stains in the cloth?
post #160 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by jefferyd View Post

I was browsing Put This On and came across another fine example of what can happen when you take a steamer to an otherwise innocent garment. The following is an Oxxford garment so we can be quite sure the bubbling has got nothing to do with fusing. This is the result of someone steaming the coat and pant. It ain't pretty.

$HIT! Good thing I am beginning to find this out just one week after I got a steamer. Wtf, everywhere I look and everyone I talk to say steaming is bad. I thought I did plenty of research on SF before I bought a steamer. Thx for the pic. 

post #161 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post


Surely there must be more to the story than simple steaming unless the guy using the steamer went hog wild or something? For example, I recently steamed several new pairs of my stepson's Lands' End "Year Rounder" trousers, which are certainly not the equals of Oxxford in quality and probably of a lighter fabric. There were no discernible ill effects, and the trousers looked fine after being given a night to rest.

There's always 2 sides to a story so I would guess that he might have done something extreme or maybe not. Me? I have been steaming away at the elbow and knee area where most wrinkles occur and have yet to see any disastrous consequences such as that one in the picture. I think light steaming to limited parts of the suit is okay. I still have to find a good professional dry cleaner who knows how to handle suits. 

post #162 of 172

A steamer might be good for very small areas if you're away from home and can't do anything else, but if you're home, what is keeping you guys from using the iron?

 

Just get a sleeve board. Much less risk of wreckage if you press gently with the iron than if you use steam only (I'm talking about touching up, not fully pressing your jackets).

post #163 of 172

I'm tempted to chime in....

post #164 of 172

Do it!

post #165 of 172

Please do before I effup my suits. I am currently steaming very small parts of my suits. Maybe I'll let it just rest and if they don't go away I'll steam it. 

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