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anyone ever use tom fords mtm program? - Page 8

post #106 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
not to be combative, but going back to Fuuma's point, how is this different than "house style" of the bespoke guys? Let's assume TF was a bespoke guy, you would go to him because you liked his outlandish suits, not to tell him how to adapt his style to yours. We see that in some of the posts here about bespoke tailors. The guys here who are clients more times than not say something to the effect "I let the tailor do as he pleased as he is the expert". Solito was interviewed not long ago and pretty much said the same thing, "come to me for what I do, not for what you want".
I agree. From what I have seen, even in bespoke monologues are usually more successful than dialogues. The advantage to bespoke, as I see it, is fit and fabric, and not the ability to direct.
post #107 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by EuropeanInterloper Redux View Post
I haven't the patience to read through this entire thread, but having been through the Tom Ford process at the Madison ave. store, and having done a great deal of requisite leg-work first in attempting to find another way of having a Tom Ford-esque suit made, I can say the following:

1. Yes, by all means critique the Tom Ford style. It is not for everyone. The shoulders are roped, the waist is very suppressed, the cut is extremely angular and fitted, the lapels can be used for power skiing. If you are heavy in any way, I would not recommend it. This is not a magic cut that will transform your Joe beer-gut into Daniel Craig. However, if you are of average proportions, have the money, and like the cut- go for it. It took several fittings but in the end, the suit was exactly what I wanted, and could not have been replicated anywhere.

2. As to my last point- this suit could not have been made anywhere at this price point. Yes, by all means, talk to me about Zegna, who effectively makes the suit but will not give you a Tom Ford model regardless of what you pay them, or Savile Row, who can give you something approximating Tom Ford, as seen through a Savile Row lense, and for largely the same price (arguably it may be better fitted or better made, being true bespoke, but you won't easily find the same fabrics or get the exact same cut without giving them a suit to reverse-engineer).

3. All this argument about whether or not TF cuts are good and bad- quite honestly, extremely unhelpful. Go and start another thread if you want to critique Ford's take on a modern silhouette, I'm sure there's already one there for you. This is not a thread about taste, but rather one in which taste has already been established. We're supposed to be helping this gentleman locate alternatives to paying Tom Ford, and many on here aren't being very helpful at all.

4. The people at the Ford store are gracious, and they do a solid job when it comes to altering the suit when it comes in from the factory. Is it worth the extra thousands? No, I don't think so, but neither do I think that you're buying a Ford suit in order to sit around upstairs, look at the Bonsai trees, and drink scotch.

Thus, I conclude, if you want a Tom Ford suit, get a Tom Ford suit. There are no other alternatives. If you want something that is somewhat LIKE a Tom Ford suit, for less money, you could try cheap bespoke, but Savile Row won't get you a suit for $5,000 (last I checked), and less expensive bespoke will only get you an approximation of a Ford suit.

EI

P.S.: Mff-- Tom Ford has a way of constructing his suits so that everything gels correctly and looks like a Tom Ford suit. Rubinacci has the same, as do AS, Kilgour, Gieves and Hawkes, etcetera. Whether the intricate means by which TF constructs his suits to look like a TF suit are more or less advanced than any of these bespoke makers is an argument for people that make suits. For the purposes of this thread, I would wager that unless I brought a TF suit to one of these makers for them to reconstruct, they would not be able to construct a TF suit on the first go-round. Any further comment should be reserved for those with actual tailoring background.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AvariceBespoke View Post
Has anyone ever used Tom Ford's MTM program?

Anyone ever purchased a suit through his MTM offering?


Are you reading your own thread?
post #108 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I agree. From what I have seen, even in bespoke monologues are usually more successful than dialogues. The advantage to bespoke, as I see it, is fit and fabric, and not the ability to direct.

+1000. I couldn't imagine going to my tailor and saying "can you copy this?"
post #109 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
not to be combative, but going back to Fuuma's point, how is this different than "house style" of the bespoke guys? Let's assume TF was a bespoke guy, you would go to him because you liked his outlandish suits, not to tell him how to adapt his style to yours. We see that in some of the posts here about bespoke tailors. The guys here who are clients more times than not say something to the effect "I let the tailor do as he pleased as he is the expert". Solito was interviewed not long ago and pretty much said the same thing, "come to me for what I do, not for what you want".

You are right...there is no difference save one: a good bespoke maker creates things for individuals, while a good RTW designer creates for a mannikin.

The peculiar talent of the great bespoke maker is often presumed or confused to be the features list: pocket here but not there; lapel this wide not that; crazy lining; odd fabric. Etc. While there is an aspect of this that is certainly true, it is in the conformity of the garment to the living body and the goals of the client where the differences are, in my view, most profound.

Tom Ford is not, nor does he pretend to be, very interested in who you are or how you look. If you fit his suits and can pay, great...if not, see ya later. This might sound like what Solito is saying, but Solito is saying that within the premise that he will fashion clothes with the primary goal of conforming to you.

Where the dialog enters in is that if you are not working your bespoke tailor with knowledge and confidence, you are not going to elicit that tailor's best. Such a tailor needs to hear from you and...this is somewhat hard...respect and be interested in what you are saying.

As far as I know, a Tom Ford client is not going to be speaking with Tom as his clothes get made up.


- B
post #110 of 540
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
Are you reading your own thread?

yes, and there have only been 2-3 posts on the actual topic. most of the writing is kind of off-topic
post #111 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by AvariceBespoke View Post
yes, and there have only been 2-3 posts on the actual topic. most of the writing is kind of off-topic

That ratio puts this thread in the top 5% on SF.


- B
post #112 of 540
I would like to see what happens if an especially rotund client tries to purchase a Tom Ford made to measure suit.
post #113 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by aportnoy View Post
+1000. I couldn't imagine going to my tailor and saying "can you copy this?"

I know a Korean tailor who does nothing but copy things out of catalogs and magazines for people.
post #114 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by unpainted huffheinz View Post
I would like to see what happens if an especially rotund client tries to purchase a Tom Ford made to measure suit.

Tom Ford walks downstairs from his office, grabs the Fabric Sample Book from the man's pudgy hands and says, "NO SUIT FOR YOU!"
post #115 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by AvariceBespoke View Post
yes, and there have only been 2-3 posts on the actual topic. most of the writing is kind of off-topic
That's because:
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
Look, if you are going to come here and talk from experience and advocate getting exactly what you, the buyer, wants and actually being happy with it, well, you are on the wrong damn forum.
1+ It should be obvious to anyone objective that TF is similar to bespoke with the difference that MTM isn't bespoke and the garment won't conform to the person - this is a good for getting a TF look and a bad for getting a unique individualized look. A TF look is not a unique look whereas a bespoke look is a unique look. There's alot of nonsense going on about how the bespoke tailors are all encompassing beyond the garment but it seems like irrational justification to me. It should be obvious that all the bespoke tailors house style can be broken down to a level, which in theory, any similarly skilled tailor can copy (or learn to copy given time). Obviously in reality it isn't the case...
post #116 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
I agree. From what I have seen, even in bespoke monologues are usually more successful than dialogues. The advantage to bespoke, as I see it, is fit and fabric, and not the ability to direct.

"I have heard of you, iammatt. Two buttons undone is laughable."

Sincerely, Tom Ford




- B
post #117 of 540
Too B&B.
post #118 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by AvariceBespoke View Post
yes, and there have only been 2-3 posts on the actual topic. most of the writing is kind of off-topic

you asked if anyone used Ford MTM, europeaninterloper wrote a detailed post on his experience.
post #119 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by iammatt View Post
Too B&B.

his left hand and all those undone buttons all over the place, are making me very uncomfortable.
post #120 of 540
Quote:
Originally Posted by edmorel View Post
his left hand and all those undone buttons all over the place, are making me very uncomfortable.

Better use of a hand?

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