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post #61 of 80
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AlanC: Just curious, how much were you able to sell off your comics for? It seems like the market for comics peaked over 10+ years ago.
Well, I sold off some odds and ends, which included some good stuff, on ebay six or seven years ago. I moved right around that time (and have since moved again) and never got around to selling the others I'm willing to part with. I didn't get a huge amount of money, of course, but a few things sold pretty well. It's been so long I've really forgotten the details of how much and what. I've not followed the comics market lately, but I'm sure it's depressed, as I would be if I followed it. Look at it this way, it's a great time to buy.
post #62 of 80
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I've not followed the comics market lately, but I'm sure it's depressed, as I would be if I followed it. Look at it this way, it's a great time to buy.
Apparently, these days all the money is in trade paperbacks - so now all comic-book storylines come in convenient six-to-eight issue blocks, for easy conversion. The Sin City movie looks like it's going to be the the single most accurate comic-to-movie translation - I'm hoping this doesn't turn it into a wooden-acting-fest. Anyone reading any more recent stuff? My highlights: Fables Invincible Planetary Powers Superman/Batman The Ultimates It's a rare thing nowadays for me to actually buy a comic, but I try to keep current.  
post #63 of 80
I don't buy comics anymore, but will still read the graphic novels at the local Barnes and Noble. But, yes, I definitely do notice a glut in the graphic novels. They seem to be putting out all the storylines, regardless of how great the storyline is. The Fables is definitely one of the strongest comics I've seen. I'm just perplexed why they even have the nudity in that comic. It's not necessary for the story, and would introduce it to a wider audience. But, from the graphic novels I've seen, really interesting concept with a strong execution and storyline. Ultimately, I wonder how much further they can take the story given the limitations of their story. I did hear that Marvel tried to artifically create speculation in their comics. What happened to comics? Why did the bottom just fall out?
post #64 of 80
I rarely buy comics nowadays, I've gotten so fed up with the clones of the Art Adams/McFarlane style with inanae storylines.. I however still keep an eye out for any new Miller stuff. I've mostly just been buying Masamune Shirow's works and have re-discovered my love of the old 70's anime super robots... Mazinger Z, Voltes V, etc.
post #65 of 80
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I did hear that Marvel tried to artifically create speculation in their comics. What happened to comics? Why did the bottom just fall out?
In the nineties, you mean? Well, when Image Comics was formed by - and I had to look this up - Lee, McFarlane, Larsen, Liefield, Silvestri, Valentino and Portacio, the market boomed, and they all sold millions of copies. That brought in speculators to the industry, who bought multiples of all the "rare" variant covers and special issues, not knowing that all the big publishers were printing hundreds of thousands of copies of each one. And so, anyone who wanted to make big bucks soon had a huge pile of comics, but no one to sell them to at a profit, because, of course, everyone else had an absolutely identical huge pile of the same comics. Upon realizing that all their comics were actually worth nothing without anyone to sell them to, all the speculators left the market, leaving only the actual fans, who couldn't realistically support all the new titles that were being published. So long, comics industry. Now Marvel underprints to prevent the exact same thing from happening, which I guess would artificially create that speculator value, but I doubt anyone will fall into that trap again.
post #66 of 80
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(esquire. @ Mar. 23 2005,00:13) I did hear that Marvel tried to artifically create speculation in their comics. What happened to comics? Why did the bottom just fall out?
In the nineties, you mean? Well, when Image Comics was formed by - and I had to look this up - Lee, McFarlane, Larsen, Liefield, Silvestri, Valentino and Portacio, the market boomed, and they all sold millions of copies. That brought in speculators to the industry, who bought multiples of all the "rare" variant covers and special issues, not knowing that all the big publishers were printing hundreds of thousands of copies of each one. And so, anyone who wanted to make big bucks soon had a huge pile of comics, but no one to sell them to at a profit, because, of course, everyone else had an absolutely identical huge pile of the same comics.
Hey, like me. Anyone want to buy an identical huge pile of comics? I have all the Image #1s and a bunch of stupid special editions, etc... all still in bags and boards, some in hard sleeves etc. At the time I was a fan, but as a Young Capitalist/Free-Marketeer I couldn't pass up the apparent opportunity. I got into comics a little while before Image and I really liked it at first. When it became a $40 a week habit at age 13 I had to slow down a bit.
post #67 of 80
T4Phage: You might also enjoy watching 'big O'. The super robot is old school, and there's an interesting story arch. Plus, the protagonist dresses up in a double breasted suit and tie every day. I really enjoyed it, but the ending is somewhat perplexing. Nick M: I thought that speculation was already rampant in comics before Image even came out. Otherwise, without that, how could you launced a succesful line like Image was able to do. Who were the speculators? Kids or adults? Real fans or outsiders? I've heard about how today kids have so many other choices, but that was also true back in the day when comics were at their peak. I don't have any proof, but I suspect the high prices of comics probably killed it off. I remember when comics were a dollar, and that was reasonable. But, today's comic prices are too high. And, then Marvel made their stories interconnect so you'd need to buy other comic lines you otherwise wouldn't want to buy. As J pointed out, this became really expensive, especially for a 13 year old boy. So, that only leaves the fanboys who can afford comics. But, its hard to still be a comic fanatic when you get older because if you've read comics long enough, you start to recognize how the stories start to repeat themselves. But, I think the real problem is how do you keep on bringing in new readers without alienating your loyal base. This is a problem every growing business faces and which devasted Brooks Brothers, but it especially affects comics. Personally, I think its funny Marvel underprints comics today. You need really strong storylines first before you can do this. When I was little, I wanted to open a comic store as a side business. I thought it would have been so cool.
post #68 of 80
You're right, a lot of factors probably killed comics - as well as increasing prices, the storylines became increasingly adult, and the distributors turned to dedicated comic book stores to sell comics, rather than newsstands - all of these things would've served to take comics out of the hands of the major market, impulse-buying kids. I'm not sure when speculation started - never even thought about it at the time - but I know the industry was huge on a level that you couldn't even dream of today. Most of Image Comics' creators had massive sales figures behind them - McFarlane's adjective-less Spider-Man #1 sold two-and-a-half-million copies, I think.
post #69 of 80
Why do you think that adult storylines ruined the comic industry? My thought was that it is difficult to carry on a storyline that will appeal both to a longtime reader and somebody, who may be an adult or a child, who doesn't have any knowledge about the background. Its difficult to jump into the middle of a story without slowing everything down and boring all the readers already caught up. And, what might be exciting to a new reader might bore a longtime fan because he's already seen this story before. If anything, I would think the attempt at writing adult, ie. better stories benefited the comic industry. As long as the stories are strong, then comics should prosper regardless of their audience. And, the rise of speciality comic stores let different stories and genres to emerge. From what my friend, whose family owns a liquor store, tells me, they get to return unbought magazines. I wouldn't be surprised if there had been a similar system under the old distribution channel for newstands and comics. How this affected specualtion I'm not sure. I'm really surprised anybody would really consider comics to have much upside. The high prices for golden age comics and baseball cards were because nobody thought back then to save them or keep them in good condition.
post #70 of 80
Originally posted by esquire:
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You might also enjoy watching 'big O'. The super robot is old school, and there's an interesting story arch. Plus, the protagonist dresses up in a double breasted suit and tie every day. I really enjoyed it, but the ending is somewhat perplexing.
Who publishes it? As for the "old school" robots, I find it quite a bit of fun. The only difficulty is finding the DVD/VCD of them.
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If anything, I would think the attempt at writing adult, ie. better stories benefited the comic industry. As long as the stories are strong, then comics should prosper regardless of their audience. And, the rise of speciality comic stores let different stories and genres to emerge.
Yep, totally agree. Down with IMAGE and the clone artists.
post #71 of 80
big O is a anime cartoon series from japan. in america, its shown on the cartoon network at 1:30 in the morning. its out on dvd. probably around 24 episodes. i'd definitely try to watch it, or rent it somehow. its not actually an old cartoon series. it just finished a year ago, but the robot itself is old school if that makes any sense. the robot used is this gigantic, unweilding mammoth. the style of the cartoon is very much influenced by the batman cartoon series. i even like the soundtrack- a beautiful torch song for the credits. but, my favorite anime song is still from tank police. gawd, i sound like such a geek right now. nick m, i wouldn't be surprised if the boom generation reaching adulthood was somehow started this whole phenomenon and speculation. they're just narcistic enough to have wanted to buy objects from their youth for nostalgic reasons. people suddenly discovered how vaulable comics could be, and this could have started it. although, this theory only works if comics from that era are especially valuable.
post #72 of 80
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big O is a anime cartoon series from japan. in america, its shown on the cartoon network at 1:30 in the morning. its out on dvd. probably around 24 episodes. i'd definitely try to watch it, or rent it somehow. its not actually an old cartoon series. it just finished a year ago, but the robot itself is old school if that makes any sense. the robot used is this gigantic, unweilding mammoth. the style of the cartoon is very much influenced by the batman cartoon series. i even like the soundtrack- a beautiful torch song for the credits. but, my favorite anime song is still from tank police. gawd, i sound like such a geek right now. nick m, i wouldn't be surprised if the boom generation reaching  adulthood was somehow started this whole phenomenon and speculation. they're just narcistic enough to have wanted to buy objects from their youth for nostalgic reasons. people suddenly discovered how vaulable comics could be, and this could have started it. although, this theory only works if comics from that era are especially valuable.
Thanks for the info, I'll try to look for it here in Nederlands... I however doubt if they show it on our Cartoon Network .
post #73 of 80
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I don't have any proof, but I suspect the high prices of comics probably killed it off.
Amen to that. Yes, I understand inflation, but when I started buying comics regularly (early '80s) at the local drug store as a kid they were 30 cents each, soon went to 35 cents. But then they raised prices faster than stamps at the post office. Who would have thought that I would actually buy hardcover comics like 'Arkham Asylum' (a beautiful book, btw)? And I got multiple copies of McFarlane's 'Spider-Man' in each of the various covers. They're all in bags with backing boards right now. I certainly fell into the speculation trap. Anybody want to buy a McFarlane Spidey #1?
post #74 of 80
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The Sin City movie looks like it's going to be the the single most accurate comic-to-movie translation - I'm hoping this doesn't turn it into a wooden-acting-fest.
Yes, I heard that they're doing shooting straight from the comics, frame by frame. Two words- Jessica Alba Haven't yet read Sin City, but I did flip through it today and I can't wait to see Jessica Alba as the stripper wearing only cowboy boots and chaps that show off her ass. I don't think she'll be a good fit as the virginal Sue Richards in the upcoming fantastic four film, but I don't have any problems with this role. Now that we know Thomas Hayden will be the next villian in the spiderman movie, what villian does everybody think he will wind up as? Bone is also a really good comic book. Very Will Eisner.
post #75 of 80
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I don't think she'll be a good fit as the virginal Sue Richards in the upcoming fantastic four film, but I don't have any problems with this role.
Apparently, the first draft for the FF movie was supposed to be set in a kind of kooky mod sixties timeframe, with the Four as celebrity super-heroes going on adventures, which I think would've been a better idea, and truer to the original series. What has actually been filmed looks like it might be a little generic - and the actors for Mr Fantastic and the Human Torch look basically interchangeable.
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Now that we know Thomas Hayden will be the next villian in the spiderman movie, what villian does everybody think he will wind up as?
Probably Sandman, or maybe the Scorpion. It better not be a villain created through a lab accident again.
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