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Ten best jeans - Page 15  

post #211 of 225
Oh, and on the Japanese denim thing, it makes no difference to me where my denim is manufactured. I think it just so happens that all of the manufacturers that appeal to hardcore denim nerds are based in Japan. I would have no problem buying unwashed jeans that came from Italy or Turkey - I think it's mostly coincidence.
post #212 of 225
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Good points. I don't see the rigid jeans becoming a snob thing, because in general they are cheaper than their laundered counterparts and are far less luxurious in general. A lot more work goes into making the hand-rubbed distressed jeans than unwashed jeans like you said, but they don't hold the same level of authenticity and personality that raw denim does. The imperfections of jeans made on antique looms is what attracts me to it, each pair is unique and will wear disctinctively based on your wearing habits, and that is really cool. There's also an attraction, for me at least, to the "blank canvas" feel of new jeans, and the fact that they become my new art project, almost. I also like the characteristics of classic jeans, such as hidden rivets, selvage seams and straight legs, and I hold a general attraction towards the history of Levis and denim in general.
While unwashed jeans *are* generally cheaper than their processed counterparts, I nevertheless think that the whole "raw denim" thing *is* really catering to snob appeal.   First of all, pretty much only the cult premium denim brands actually make a raw denim jean (and don't anyone insult my intelligence and tell me I'm wrong because A.P.C. jeans are cheaper than say, Sevens.  Their policy to never have their jeans on sale and their extremely limited distribution are strategically to maintain their cult appeal.)   Second, all the gewgaws that goes along with the whole authenticity bit - the use of selvedge denim (which, in my experience, doesn't really add that much to the "durability" of the jean, although a lot of denimheads will contend otherwise), and thus the inherent need to have denim from antique (non projectile) shuttle looms, puts them out of reach of most the mass market consumer.  You can't fake selvedge effectively, after all. And the snob appeal of specialized knowledge is even more insidious than the snob appeal of being able to by a lot of money. I have no problem with wearing Sevens, or Levis Premiums, or any other ubiquitous jean that a denimhead who wears only A.P.C. and obscure Japanese brands would smirk at.  Actually, one of my favorite pairs is a boot cut pair of Sevens in a some discontinued dark wash (have never really noticed the saggy butt problem, but I wear my jeans rather low and loose, so stretching out jeans at the butt is pretty much never a problem.) That said, I *do* like to customize my jeans, raw, once-rinsed, or processed (am currently weaing a pair of self customized Da'mage Ice jeans, to have something "individual".)
post #213 of 225
LAGuy, I've noticed a few times to references of your own customized jeans. Would it be possible to post some pictures? I'd love to see. Thanks, Dan
post #214 of 225
Thread Starter 
I'd love to have a digital camera. But don't worry, the jeans never get thrown out, and ony get more and more customized.
post #215 of 225
Quote:
I'd love to have a digital camera. But don't worry, the jeans never get thrown out, and ony get more and more customized.
What are you doing to your ice's? Don't worry, I am not going to copy them, but I've been wearing mine hard (every day pretty much), and I haven't noticed a single change, so I am just curious to what you're doing with yours.
post #216 of 225
Quote:
You can't fake selvedge effectively, after all.
I saw an unwashed pair of jeans at H&M that looked like selvedge. They were 30-or-so dollars, so I assumed they weren't, but is it possible to fake? The ends of the seemed part, whatever it's called, weren't stitched up (the way non-selvedge jeans are to prevent unraveling) and they had that white edge that I've seen on some selvedge. You know what's up?
post #217 of 225
Selvage jeans are definitely getting more and more ubiquitous. They are not fakable. Many companies including GAP make selvage jeans - it does not necessarily mean the jeans are exceptional, or even good, for that matter (this is part of the problem that LA Guy is ranting about, people demanding selvage jeans when it does not mean that they are well-made or stylish any moreso than non-selvage PDCs). $20-40 Levis Shrink-To-Fit sometimes have selvage (depending on where they're made). The denim quality at H&M is probably horrendous. It's like Kenneth Cole putting functional buttonholes on their jackets. It doesn't mean the jackets are good, it just means that people are starting to pay attention to these gimmicks.
post #218 of 225
Thread Starter 
Quote:
What are you doing to your ice's? Don't worry, I am not going to copy them, but I've been wearing mine hard (every day pretty much), and I haven't noticed a single change, so I am just curious to what you're doing with yours.
GOt a rip in the left hip pocket, and had to put on a patch. Used darker denim (leftover from hemming another pair of jeans) and teal embroidery thread to tightly loop stitch it on. Then, to reinforce the pockets, I did a three layer stitching - chocolate brown loop, burnt orange chain (a little like the seam thread) and chococlate chain on each of the hip pockets. Then, a small hole developed in own of the wear bits. Took a piece of dark denim behind the hole (i.e. on the inside of the jean, and zigzag stitched that on with the organge thread. Pretty interesting looking.
post #219 of 225
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Selvage jeans are definitely getting more and more ubiquitous. They are not fakable.
Actually, it is fakable. Companies will use a chain stitch to fake the selvedge seam. If you compare this stitch side by side with real selvedge though, you'll be able to discern the difference easily.
post #220 of 225
Brian, are you still thinking about starting a denim discussion board? If this thread is any indication, the interest is certainly out there. Do it.
post #221 of 225
Quote:
Quote:
Selvage jeans are definitely getting more and more ubiquitous. They are not fakable.
Actually, it is fakable. Companies will use a chain stitch to fake the selvedge seam. If you compare this stitch side by side with real selvedge though, you'll be able to discern the difference easily.
Well, you can attempt to fake it, but cannot succeed. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding. You could certainly fold extra fabric through the inseam (on both sides) and chain stitch it down to make it look like a red line selvage seam to untrained eyes (is that what you mean?). However, if you can't see the white edge of the fabric, then it's not selvage.
post #222 of 225
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Well, you can attempt to fake it, but cannot succeed. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding. You could certainly fold extra fabric through the inseam (on both sides) and chain stitch it down to make it look like a red line selvage seam to untrained eyes (is that what you mean?). However, if you can't see the white edge of the fabric, then it's not selvage.
That is pretty close to how it's being done. Ugh.
post #223 of 225
Quote:
Well, you can attempt to fake it, but cannot succeed. Perhaps I'm misunderstanding. You could certainly fold extra fabric through the inseam (on both sides) and chain stitch it down to make it look like a red line selvage seam to untrained eyes (is that what you mean?). However, if you can't see the white edge of the fabric, then it's not selvage.
Why and how does that edge stay white?
post #224 of 225
I am looking for reinforcement on this one, but I believe the white edge is there because those are the weft threads (the underneath threads), and they continue for usually 1-3 thread-width after the indigo-dyed threads stop. This is the actual end of the cloth, when the shuttle has stopped weaving, which is opposed to non-selvage where they weave a wider sheet of denim, then cut the edges and sew them together on the inseam. You do not actually see the original edge of the woven fabric, just where the fabric was cut.
post #225 of 225
Moved to new Streetwear and Denim forum.
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