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Luxuries you can live without - Page 7

post #91 of 147
Kiehls in their product base, and by their packaging hardly seems a "luxury" product. I will pay money for things that interest me which may or not be luxuries to some. Be it a Leica or a 1937 typewriter to a Prada workbag.
post #92 of 147
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Savings, family and education are top priorities in most of our families.  
The perfect religious clone. Are your a mormon? My priorities is = my pleasure and happiness Education = once you are educated what do you do? After 20/25 years of study, you can say your are educated. You will not spend all your life to study. You can always learn some stuffs more but you are educated enough. Family = what do you call family? It is sensless to be the slave of people just because you are in the same familiy. For exemple you didn't choose your brother. If you don't like him (you could have never been his friend if he hadn't been your brother) I don't see why he should be a priority more than your dog or even your ties in your life. Savings = saving for what? for your grave?
post #93 of 147
I think that a little luxury is important in everyone's life. As in all things, you can go too far. Folks can (and often do) spend themselves into ruin for things they don't need. However, owning and using beautiful and useful things is something that provides me with happiness. Case in point: As I write this, I am listening to my wife in the other room playing Mozart on our piano. It's one of the nicest pianos money can buy, and I spent an obscene amount of money on it. Some would say that it was a waste to spend that much money on this piano, when I could have purchased a much less expensive piano that would have sounded and played almost as well. However, I've never regretted purchasing our piano. The sound is wonderful, it is a joy to play, and it looks beautiful. Our kids' piano teacher stays at our home after their lessons (sometimes for an hour) just to play it. Is our piano "worth the money" I paid for it? No. Not in any rational or measurable sense. However, it is a thing of beauty and provides my family (especially my wife) with pleasure, and makes my home more beautiful. I'm really glad I bought it. Over the years, it has more than justified its price (to me.) I can think of other luxuries in my life that bring me genuine pleasure. Looking at the magazine article which started this thread, I have to say that I love my AllClad pots and my Sabatier knives, and my LeCreuset wok. Could I cook without them? Certainly. I cooked countless meals prior to owning these things. However, cooking with good tools makes the process easier and more enjoyable. As for Chocolate, life is simply too short to eat nasty chocolate. Once I experienced Valharona, Hersheys just didn't cut it anymore. Lastly, I will leave you with two quotes. One is from Esquire (one of the few things I've seen in Esquire that was worth quoting.) The other is from King Lear. It's Lear's response to his daughters' decision that his retainers were an unneeded and frivolous luxury. Esquire: It's hard to imagine how anyone could spend $250,000 on a car. Unless you've driven a $250,000 car. King Lear Act II, Scene 4 Lear: O, reason not the need: our basest beggars Are in the poorest thing superfluous: Allow not nature more than nature needs, Man's life's as cheap as beast's: thou art a lady; If only to go warm were gorgeous, Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear'st, Which scarcely keeps thee warm.
post #94 of 147
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it's hard to imagine how anyone could spend $250,000 on a car.  Unless you've driven a $250,000 car.  
If you earn $25 000 per month it seem normal to buy such a car.
post #95 of 147
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If you earn $25 000 per month it seem normal to buy such a car.
I think your typical Bentley buyer earns alot more then $25,000 a month.
post #96 of 147
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(paul44 @ Feb. 26 2005,06:28) Savings, family and education are top priorities in most of our families.
The perfect religious clone. Are your a mormon?
Our priorities are more along the lines of family, education, and then savings.
post #97 of 147
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If you earn $25 000 per month it seem normal to buy such a car.
I think your typical Bentley buyer earns alot more then $25,000 a month.
And what is the typical income of a guy who buys a car of $25 000 ?
post #98 of 147
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Quote At the end of the day, I save almost 70% of my take home. By far my biggest "expenditure" is the rape of taxation, which is about 800% higher than my housing cost. How is that financially possible if you live in or around NYC? Even someone making 200k/year, who pays $72,000/annum in taxes... divided by the 800% difference between taxes and housing costs... leaves $750/month for rent?? Unless you're the lone millionaire living in Bed-Stuy (excluding the drug dealers) the numbers don't seem very realistic.
I am single, have no children, and make a concerted effort to live well below my means. I have for a while, so investment income is part of that 70%. (In interest of honesty, I went back and did the calc again for last year, and it wasnt quite 70% - it came out to about 67% percent.) It really not all that hard if you have discipline. For instance, my lifesyle is not all that different from the one I had several years ago when I graduated B-school, but my income is up by several hundreds of a percent. I just never raised my expenditures commensurately with my salary. I make a budget, and I stick to it. Granted, the bonus heavy pay structure in my field makes it somewhat easier - I start with investing my entire bonus, which is more than 2/3rds my total comp. I then try to save more from the increase on my base. This year, I anticipate banking over 70%. At this rate, I will be retired in less than ten years and still in my 40s. Life is good.
post #99 of 147
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Even someone making 200k/year, who pays $72,000/annum in taxes... divided by the 800% difference between taxes and housing costs... leaves $750/month for rent?? Unless you're the lone millionaire living in Bed-Stuy (excluding the drug dealers) the numbers don't seem very realistic
FYI - until very recently, I lived in the same rent stabilized apt by Columbia U for six years. The rent started at $950 and when I left it was not quite $1100. Also, I do not made 200K. Trust me - the numbers are realistic. I base my budgeting decisions on them.
post #100 of 147
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I think that a little luxury is important in everyone's life.  As in all things, you can go too far.  Folks can (and often do) spend themselves into ruin for things they don't need. However, owning and using beautiful and useful things is something that provides me with happiness.  Case in point:  As I write this, I am listening to my wife in the other room playing Mozart on our piano.  It's one of the nicest pianos money can buy, and I spent an obscene amount of money on it.  Some would say that it was a waste to spend that much money on this piano, when I could have purchased a much less expensive piano that would have sounded and played almost as well.  However, I've never regretted purchasing our piano.  The sound is wonderful, it is a joy to play, and it looks beautiful.  Our kids' piano teacher stays at our home after their lessons (sometimes for an hour) just to play it.   Is our piano "worth the money" I paid for it?  No.  Not in any rational or measurable sense.  However, it is a thing of beauty and provides my family (especially my wife) with pleasure, and makes my home more beautiful.  I'm really glad I bought it.  Over the years, it has more than justified its price (to me.)   I can think of other luxuries in my life that bring me genuine pleasure.  Looking at the magazine article which started this thread, I have to say that I love my AllClad pots and my Sabatier knives, and my LeCreuset wok.  Could I cook without them?  Certainly.  I cooked countless meals prior to owning these things.  However, cooking with good tools makes the process easier and more enjoyable.  As for Chocolate, life is simply too short to eat nasty chocolate.  Once I experienced Valharona, Hersheys just didn't cut it anymore.   Lastly, I will leave you with two quotes.  One is from Esquire (one of the few things I've seen in Esquire that was worth quoting.)  The other is from King Lear.  It's Lear's response to his daughters' decision that his retainers were an unneeded and frivolous luxury. Esquire:  It's hard to imagine how anyone could spend $250,000 on a car.  Unless you've driven a $250,000 car.   King Lear Act II, Scene 4 Lear:  O, reason not the need: our basest beggars Are in the poorest thing superfluous: Allow not nature more than nature needs, Man's life's as cheap as beast's: thou art a lady; If only to go warm were gorgeous, Why, nature needs not what thou gorgeous wear'st, Which scarcely keeps thee warm.
You make some good points. A little luxury can go a long way in furthuring one's appreciation of life. Conversely, luxury that is pursued for its own sake becomes extravagance, and luxury that is acquired beyond one's means is foolish. I can be said to be guilty on both counts (more clothes and shoes than I have practical use for, for example) though I also possess some so-called luxury items I truly appreciate and fully utilize. Like you, I enjoy cooking, and derive great satisfaction from the heft and balance of my Wursthof & Henckels knives, and All-Clad pans, Emile Henry bakers, etc. Conversely, I am not a big wine drinker, hence find that the basic selection of Crate & Barrel wine glasses to be sufficient for my needs (eek.). For those of you who are passionate about wine however, having the proper glasses to appreciate each varietal makes sense. For others who truly appreciate the satiny feeling of high-thread count linens against your skin, why not? If a beautiful piano enriches your life and brings you constant pleasure and is within your means, buy it. We should enjoy what we can in this life.
post #101 of 147
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My priorities is = my pleasure and happiness Education = once you are educated what do you do? After 20/25 years of study, you can say your are educated. You will not spend all your life to study. You can always learn some stuffs more but you are educated enough. Family = what do you call family? It is sensless to be the slave of people just because you are in the same familiy. For exemple you didn't choose your brother. If you don't like him (you could have never been his friend if he hadn't been your brother) I don't see why he should be a priority more than your dog or even your ties in your life.
Hey, you think these things because you are an a**hole. Some other members might agree about the education thing, but how can youhave that attitude towards your own family? I have a suggestion. Why don't you tell them about this attitude. Please post the results.
post #102 of 147
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The perfect religious clone. Are your a mormon? My priorities is = my pleasure and happiness Education = once you are educated what do you do? After 20/25 years of study, you can say your are educated. You will not spend all your life to study. You can always learn some stuffs more but you are educated enough. Family = what do you call family? It is sensless to be the slave of people just because you are in the same familiy. For exemple you didn't choose your brother. If you don't like him (you could have never been his friend if he hadn't been your brother) I don't see why he should be a priority more than your dog or even your ties in your life. Savings = saving for what? for your grave?
This post tells me three things about you - 1) You have never worked an honest day in your life, and have no financial discipline. 2) Even your family hates you. 3) You received gentlemens Cs in college (generously assuming you attended) and havent picked up reading material more challenging than a tabloid since.
post #103 of 147
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(paul44 @ Feb. 26 2005,06:28) Savings, family and education are top priorities in most of our families.  
The perfect religious clone. Are your a mormon? My priorities is = my pleasure and happiness Education = once you are educated what do you do? After 20/25 years of study, you can say your are educated. You will not spend all your life to study. You can always learn some stuffs more but you are educated enough. Family = what do you call family? It is sensless to be the slave of people just because you are in the same familiy. For exemple you didn't choose your brother. If you don't like him (you could have never been his friend if he hadn't been your brother) I don't see why he should be a priority more than your dog or even your ties in your life. Savings = saving for what? for your grave?
Ahhhh Ernest. You always seem to find a way to endear yourself to others. This should make for an interesting few pages. Anyone want to take bets whether this turns into a pi@@ing match and the thread gets locked?
post #104 of 147
Kai, I agree with many of your points, I feel the same way about many of my possessions. As far as cars go, I think you get severe diminshing returns when you get past the $150k range, especially with the great aftermarket support of many of the cars out there. I've had the good fortune to drive many of the greatest cars on the market in the past 10 years, and while I think there are actually a few good "values" for exotics in the 100-200k range (The Gallardo and F430 are probably the best "value" of any sports cars in that price range) I would say it's mostly about style and less about substance in that price range. One F360 owner I know said that the main reason that he owns his car is because of how people view him. Although he loves the car, he deals with the enormous costs of regular maintainance, frequent downtime, and poor warranty coverage because of the attention. Personally I'm not a huge fan of exotics for that reason, they're difficult to live with, and while it's nice to have attention, that's not really what I'm about. Although most people feel I spent way too much money on a car, and may possibly be right, I went with a car that had the best performance characteristics with good reliability, relatively low cost of ownership, and a good factory warranty that I felt was still affordable (2003 911 Turbo) With the horsepower revolution in the last 3 years, you can buy a lot of car for 30-60k, more so than any time period since the early/mid 90s, so there's a lot of choices out there for people who are really interested in going fast without spending a lot of money. IMO this has driven the price of exotics down somewhat and many of the manufacturers are more realistic with their pricing (except for Ferrari who has a waiting list that is near 2007 or so for the 360/430) and prices are not at the heady heights of the dot-com era. I think it's a good time to be shopping for cars now...
post #105 of 147
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The perfect religious clone. Are your a mormon? My priorities is = my pleasure and happiness Education = once you are educated what do you do? After 20/25 years of study, you can say your are educated. You will not spend all your life to study. You can always learn some stuffs more but you are educated enough. Family = what do you call family? It is sensless to be the slave of people just because you are in the same familiy. For exemple you didn't choose your brother. If you don't like him (you could have never been his friend if he hadn't been your brother) I don't see why he should be a priority more than your dog or even your ties in your life. Savings = saving for what? for your grave?
This post tells me three things about you - 1) You have never worked an honest day in your life, and have no financial discipline. 2) Even your family hates you. 3) You received gentlemens Cs in college (generously assuming you attended) and havent picked up reading material more challenging than a tabloid since.
Well, apparently our unemployed friend has worked in the past, which is the source of his generous handout from the French government, but I agree with the rest of your points. I think that type of attitude towards family is anathema to most on this board, and the attitude towards education comes through quite well through his posts, english lessons nonwithstanding.
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