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Luxuries you can live without - Page 8

post #106 of 147
there is importance in the attitude of the pirchase, or the ownership, too. I have a friend, who studied to be a concert pianist and ended up an engineer, who recently bought a piano for about the same amount that my mother's house sold for when she retired recently. he has some money, he is not wealthy but very very comfortable, and this required some consideration on his part, but he and he wife, and their son, all play, and he wanted the best piano he could get. I happened to be traveling in germany with him when he bought it, or I am sure that I never would have known how much it cost. I have another friend, who has a nice amount of money from his family and has never really worked in his life. his parents are both in the music business, and they have two baby grand pianos in their living room, with the room set up like alittle concert hall. they have music played in that room twice a year, maybe, but this way they can always comment on the musical background of the family when somebody is suprised at teh two pianos. the only real pleasure they get from the pianos is the attention that they atract. the first guy I think is pretty cool. the second a putz.
post #107 of 147
Drizz...since you brought up cars... Why not go with an M5? Half the wait and cost. I think I wil stick with my M3 for a couple more years before jumping to the 5. Is the wait for an F360 really that long? I would assume this is if you want it spanking new. Wouldnt the smarter thing be to get a used one? e
post #108 of 147
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Drizz...since you brought up cars... Why not go with an M5? Half the wait and cost. I think I wil stick with my M3 for a couple more years before jumping to the 5. Is the wait for an F360 really that long? I would assume this is if you want it spanking new. Wouldnt the smarter thing be to get a used one? e
I'll smoke that M3 and M5 in my SLK-350. Heh heh.
post #109 of 147
Quote:
there is importance in the attitude of the pirchase, or the ownership, too. I have a friend, who studied to be a concert pianist and ended up an engineer, who recently bought a piano for about the same amount that my mother's house sold for when she retired recently. he has some money, he is not wealthy but very very comfortable, and this required some consideration on his part, but he and he wife, and their son, all play, and he wanted the best piano he could get. I happened to be traveling in germany with him when he bought it, or I am sure that I never would have known how much it cost. I have another friend, who has a nice amount of money from his family and has never really worked in his life. his parents are both in the music business, and they have two baby grand pianos in their living room, with the room set up like alittle concert hall. they have music played in that room twice a year, maybe, but this way they can always comment on the musical background of the family when somebody is suprised at teh two pianos. the only real pleasure they get from the pianos is the attention that they atract. the first guy I think is pretty cool. the second a putz.
What type of piano did your friend buy? I love pianos. I once dated a woman for far too long simply because she would regularly invite me over to listen to her recite Rachmaninoff on her Steinway baby grand (she lived in a warehouse, and had the most gorgeous piano, outside of that she owned almost nothing). We had a beautiful Bosendorfer when I was a child, a nice concert grand that I learned piano on. My father plays quite well, and he would regularly use it. While it was quite expensive, it was also beautiful and what it added to the house was probably quite worth the price.
post #110 of 147
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internet
What about it?
post #111 of 147
Whoa whoa linux take it easy on me im only 24. Get back at me in a couple years. =]
post #112 of 147
mrplover, Buying a used ferrari isn't very smart, as the warranties are very short, and if anything breaks, you're looking at enormous repair costs, it's a very expensive car to own. The waitlist was so long for 360 owners that many of them are now on the waiting list for 430s as they were automatically upgraded for the same price, which was nice for them, but they won't see their cars for awhile yet. I'm referring to the convertible, the coupe is not that hard to get.
post #113 of 147
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Quote:
(globetrotter @ Feb. 26 2005,13:50) there is importance in the attitude of the pirchase, or the ownership, too. I have a friend, who studied to be a concert pianist and ended up an engineer, who recently bought a piano for about the same amount that my mother's house sold for when she retired recently. he has some money, he is not wealthy but very very comfortable, and this required some consideration on his part, but he and he wife, and their son, all play, and he wanted the best piano he could get. I happened to be traveling in germany with him when he bought it, or I am sure that I never would have known how much it cost. I have another friend, who has a nice amount of money from his family and has never really worked in his life. his parents are both in the music business, and they have two baby grand pianos in their living room, with the room set up like alittle concert hall. they have music played in that room twice a year, maybe, but this way they can always comment on the musical background of the family when somebody is suprised at teh two pianos. the only real pleasure they get from the pianos is the attention that they atract. the first guy I think is pretty cool. the second a putz.
What type of piano did your friend buy?  I love pianos.  I once dated a woman for far too long simply because she would regularly invite me over to listen to her recite Rachmaninoff on her Steinway baby grand (she lived in a warehouse, and had the most gorgeous piano, outside of that she owned almost nothing). We had a beautiful Bosendorfer when I was a child, a nice concert grand that I learned piano on.  My father plays quite well, and he would regularly use it.  While it was quite expensive, it was also beautiful and what it added to the house was probably quite worth the price.
sorry, I don't know,except that it was German made. we were at a trade show in Germany and he went off for a day and came back looking like a guy who had jsut spent a little more than he could affird on something and blurted out "holy shit, I just spent 50K on a piano".
post #114 of 147
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What type of piano did your friend buy?  
If it was German, my guess is that it was a Steingraeber & Sohn.
post #115 of 147
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...when I splurge on something, I tend to go with a small operation that will return that revenue to the economy.  That's essential to a healthy national economy, and hence, my job.... ...I'll smoke that M3 and M5 in my SLK-350.  Heh heh.
So when did Mercedes Benz become a small local operation? heh heh...
post #116 of 147
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Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter,Feb. 26 2005,13:50
there is importance in the attitude of the pirchase, or the ownership, too. I have a friend, who studied to be a concert pianist and ended up an engineer, who recently bought a piano for about the same amount that my mother's house sold for when she retired recently. he has some money, he is not wealthy but very very comfortable, and this required some consideration on his part, but he and he wife, and their son, all play, and he wanted the best piano he could get. I happened to be traveling in germany with him when he bought it, or I am sure that I never would have known how much it cost. I have another friend, who has a nice amount of money from his family and has never really worked in his life. his parents are both in the music business, and they have two baby grand pianos in their living room, with the room set up like alittle concert hall. they have music played in that room twice a year, maybe, but this way they can always comment on the musical background of the family when somebody is suprised at teh two pianos. the only real pleasure they get from the pianos is the attention that they atract. the first guy I think is pretty cool. the second a putz.
What type of piano did your friend buy?  I love pianos.  I once dated a woman for far too long simply because she would regularly invite me over to listen to her recite Rachmaninoff on her Steinway baby grand (she lived in a warehouse, and had the most gorgeous piano, outside of that she owned almost nothing). We had a beautiful Bosendorfer when I was a child, a nice concert grand that I learned piano on.  My father plays quite well, and he would regularly use it.  While it was quite expensive, it was also beautiful and what it added to the house was probably quite worth the price.
One cannot understand true luxury until you've played a Faziolli....
post #117 of 147
Perhaps it was a Seiler piano.
post #118 of 147
Quote:
Quote:
(linux_pro @ Feb. 26 2005,14:31)
Quote:
Originally Posted by globetrotter,Feb. 26 2005,13:50
there is importance in the attitude of the pirchase, or the ownership, too. I have a friend, who studied to be a concert pianist and ended up an engineer, who recently bought a piano for about the same amount that my mother's house sold for when she retired recently. he has some money, he is not wealthy but very very comfortable, and this required some consideration on his part, but he and he wife, and their son, all play, and he wanted the best piano he could get. I happened to be traveling in germany with him when he bought it, or I am sure that I never would have known how much it cost. I have another friend, who has a nice amount of money from his family and has never really worked in his life. his parents are both in the music business, and they have two baby grand pianos in their living room, with the room set up like alittle concert hall. they have music played in that room twice a year, maybe, but this way they can always comment on the musical background of the family when somebody is suprised at teh two pianos. the only real pleasure they get from the pianos is the attention that they atract. the first guy I think is pretty cool. the second a putz.
What type of piano did your friend buy? I love pianos. I once dated a woman for far too long simply because she would regularly invite me over to listen to her recite Rachmaninoff on her Steinway baby grand (she lived in a warehouse, and had the most gorgeous piano, outside of that she owned almost nothing). We had a beautiful Bosendorfer when I was a child, a nice concert grand that I learned piano on. My father plays quite well, and he would regularly use it. While it was quite expensive, it was also beautiful and what it added to the house was probably quite worth the price.
One cannot understand true luxury until you've played a Faziolli....
Don't tempt Koji, I think that's his next move. Jon.
post #119 of 147
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Hey, you think these things because you are an a**hole. Some other members might agree about the education thing, but how can youhave that attitude towards your own family? I have a suggestion. Why don't you tell them about this attitude. Please post the results.
LA Guy, I don't know Ernest's remarks shock you. Remember that heat wave that Europe a while back...the one that killed off 20,000 of the French? It was widely reported that hundreds of the French informed authorities to keep their relatives on deep freeze so that they could finished their annual holidays before they want back home to bury their relatives. Nothing about the French shocks me anymore.
post #120 of 147
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Family = what do you call family? It is sensless to be the slave of people just because you are in the same familiy. For exemple you didn't choose your brother. If you don't like him (you could have never been his friend if he hadn't been your brother) I don't see why he should be a priority more than your dog or even your ties in your life.
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