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Expensive pocket squares - Page 2

post #16 of 118
These prices are getting f'ing ridiculous! $125 for a pocket square!!!

Why do people pay this? Boycott!!
post #17 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Siggy View Post
These prices are getting f'ing ridiculous! $125 for a pocket square!!!

Why do people pay this? Boycott!!

Boycott style? Boycott things you would love to buy? No way!
post #18 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
It's with regard to sinking in and falling out that I think larger squares have the advantage. The extra volume tends to keep a square in place on way or another.

+1
post #19 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
The disappearing pocket square, like the flaccid tie knot, is one of life's tragedies that seems to have skipped me.

A pocket square, even an expensive one, is still a somewhat trivial sartorial cost, so why not be relatively extravagant?

For silk squares, the quality of the prints (the silk, the number of dyes used, etc.) and the fineness of the sewing in the rolled edge seem to me not to top off until you get to the realm of the most pricey.



For other fabrics, the differences are still meaningful:





As is mining the past:



- B
I have the top three, but not the Grrranimals square. Good squares are hard enough to find without worrying about price. You really don't need many, so don't skimp.
post #20 of 118
I find that price is not a good indication of pocket square quality. Other than the hand-rolled edges, there really is no "construction" aspect of pocket squares. It really comes down to the size you want and finding a fabric that's appealing to you. Two things traits I thoroughly despise in pocket squares: 1) Freakishly large proportions. 12" square is ideal. Lots of companies seem to make 16" square squares, which doubles the bulk, increases the cost, and little else. It's ridiculous. 2) Wide borders. I've never understood why otherwise attractive pocket squares with beautiful patterns will have wide plain borders around the edge. Doesn't that defeat the purpose of the design if you were t he square with the edges exposed? After some experimenting with different squares at different prices, I'm convinced Kent Wang is one of the only people out there who "gets this"
post #21 of 118
^+1 to the foregoing.

I note that some of my Roger Talbott squares run 18" to the side. Nice squares but great "crawlers." I don't mind a bit of flamboyance with a square, but I don't want to look as if I've got a goddamn balloon on my chest!

I find silk squares tend to want to escape regardless of whether they are cheap or expensive.

Paying a large amount for attractive designs on a square (as with Hermes) makes no sense to me as the square not going to be displayed in its entirety. It will be puffed or folded so that only very small figures will be discernible, not those big zebras and whatnot that Hermes likes to put on their squares. Rather garish affairs, anyway, in my opinion.
post #22 of 118
Considering the majority of my squares were relatively inexpensive, I just stick a piece of double-sided tape between the jacket and the square. I have not had to worry about having the square sink into the jacket.
post #23 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post

I find silk squares tend to want to escape regardless of whether they are cheap or expensive.


Escape has more to do with the tension of the pocket than the silk. Said another way, when the pocket gapes, silk escapes.

And small squares fall down.
post #24 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
Paying a large amount for attractive designs on a square (as with Hermes) makes no sense to me as the square not going to be displayed in its entirety. It will be puffed or folded so that only very small figures will be discernible, not those big zebras and whatnot that Hermes likes to put on their squares. Rather garish affairs, anyway, in my opinion.

I understand what you are saying, but part of the point of an elaborate print is that when it goes into a pocket, the elaboration is abstracted and the variety of colors and tones are what become important.

My opinion, though, is that this works best with only a bit of the square showing, and no or few edges...when it starts exploding out of the pocket like a jungle plant, you had better be an accomplished fop to make it anything but clownish.

- B
post #25 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by voxsartoria View Post
I understand what you are saying, but part of the point of an elaborate print is that when it goes into a pocket, the elaboration is abstracted and the variety of colors and tones are what become important. My opinion, though, is that this works best with only a bit of the square showing, and no or few edges...when it starts exploding out of the pocket like a jungle plant, you had better be an accomplished fop to make it anything but clownish. - B
post #26 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Film Noir Buff View Post

That is a very large pocket, but there is no square.
post #27 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by FidelCashflow View Post
I find that price is not a good indication of pocket square quality. Other than the hand-rolled edges, there really is no "construction" aspect of pocket squares. It really comes down to the size you want and finding a fabric that's appealing to you.

Two things traits I thoroughly despise in pocket squares:

1) Freakishly large proportions. 12" square is ideal. Lots of companies seem to make 16" square squares, which doubles the bulk, increases the cost, and little else. It's ridiculous.

2) Wide borders. I've never understood why otherwise attractive pocket squares with beautiful patterns will have wide plain borders around the edge. Doesn't that defeat the purpose of the design if you were t he square with the edges exposed?

After some experimenting with different squares at different prices, I'm convinced Kent Wang is one of the only people out there who "gets this"

1. I am not exactly sure how large my squares are, but I think they are all on the larger side. I don`t like the smaller ones because the type of folds you can do are quite limited. The larger ones allow much more flexibility and variation in the folds.

2. Similar to #1 above, the squares with narrow edges lack versatility. The wider edge gives the square more versatility and you can fold it several different ways and give the fold more interest.

When it comes to price, I guess it`s all about balance. There is no reason to buy an expensive square if the rest of the outfit is cheap, but if everything else is high quality, I question why someone would go cheap on just the square. Clearly the expensive ones use better silks and patterns.
post #28 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
Paying a large amount for attractive designs on a square (as with Hermes) makes no sense to me as the square not going to be displayed in its entirety. It will be puffed or folded so that only very small figures will be discernible, not those big zebras and whatnot that Hermes likes to put on their squares. Rather garish affairs, anyway, in my opinion.

Almost all my squares are the Hermes-type ones. I find them to be the most versatile (and stylish). On the other hand, I don`t like the ones with repeated, simple patterns much as to my eye they usually distract rather than compliment everything else.

To stir the pot a bit, I think there might be a pocket square progression/ladder:

beginner: white, linen/cotton, TV fold

amateur: small, silk, repeated-small patterns, TV style/bandaid fold

intermediate: small, silk, repeated-small patterns, simple puff

advanced: large, silk, picturesque design, more elaborate folds and combination folds. Can also fold linen with colored borders and silk with wide edges in various different folds.
post #29 of 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragon View Post
Almost all my squares are the Hermes-type ones. I find them to be the most versatile (and stylish). On the other hand, I don`t like the ones with repeated, simple patterns much as to my eye they usually distract rather than compliment everything else.

To stir the pot a bit, I think there might be a pocket square progression/ladder:

beginner: white, linen/cotton, TV fold

amateur: small, silk, repeated-small patterns, TV style/bandaid fold

intermediate: small, silk, repeated-small patterns, simple puff

advanced: large, silk, picturesque design, more elaborate folds and combination folds. Can also fold linen with colored borders and silk with wide edges in various different folds.

master: white, linen/cotton, TV fold.

Fixed
post #30 of 118
^^I'm a big fan of the white linen TV fold.
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