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should i get a dog? - Page 3

post #31 of 90
Iammattmanbearpug?
post #32 of 90
If you train your dog well, there will be no pee-breaks at 2 in the morning. If you train your dog well, it won't jump up on your wife's dress. If you train your dog well, it will not tear up the furniture. ...just saying... You can get a leash for a cat and walk it like a dog. You just have to get the cat acclamated to it. Certain breeds need a ton of excerize... like the Bengal, which is the type of cat I reallly want.
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post #33 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing View Post
I've always wanted a cat so I could walk it.
I'll have to get my cat to pose with his leash. Walking a cat is quite difficult, I can't get mine past the porch. It doesn't help that I got him when he was 10y/o. And yes, get a dog, as long as you and your wife want one, because you'll end up taking care of it some of the time. Teach the kids some responsibility.
post #34 of 90
I can't imagine a childhood without a dog. Yes get one or two!
post #35 of 90
So many dog haters.

A passionate defense of the dog...

On that fall day in 1870 when country lawyer George Graham Vest stood up in Judge Foster Wright's courtroom in Warrensburg, Mo., to defend a dog, few present could have imagined that what they were about to hear would become the most memorable tribute in modern history to man's best friend.

George Graham Vest speaking:

"Gentlemen of the jury, the best friend a man has in this world may turn against him and become his enemy. His son or daughter whom he has reared with loving care may prove ungrateful. Those who are nearest and dearest to us--those whom we trust with our happiness and good name--may become traitors in their faith. The money that a man has he may lose. It flies away from him, perhaps when he needs it most. A man's reputation may be sacrificed in a moment of ill-considered action. The people who are prone to fall on their knees to do us honor when success is with us may be the 1st to throw the stone of malice when failure settles its cloud upon our heads. The one absolute, unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world--the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous--is his dog.

"Gentlemen of the jury, a man's dog stands by him in prosperity and poverty, in health and sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, where the wintry winds blow, and the snow drives fiercely, if only he can be near his master's side. He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer; he will lick the wounds and sores that come in encounter with the roughness of the world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince. When all other friends desert, he remains. When riches take wings and reputation falls to pieces, he is as constant in his love as the sun in its journey through the heavens.

"If fortune drives the master forth an outcast in the world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that of accompanying him to guard against danger, to fight against his enemies. And when the last scene of all comes, and death takes the master in its embrace, and his body is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends pursue their way, there by his graveside will the noble dog be found, his head between his paws, his eyes sad but open in alert watchfulness, faithful and true even to death."

Kunk, get a dog. Teach your kids to have responsibility for something other than themselves.

Jan L or I can help point you in the right direction with regards to breed type and selection.

lefty
post #36 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
So many dog haters.

A passionate defense of the dog...

Speaking of the reality of owning a pet does not = hating dogs.

Man, people see things in such black and white terms sometimes.
post #37 of 90
Get a dog. It's really rewarding. Train it well (or just take a race that doesn't make too much trouble and train it mediocre). And get a real dog:

My parents have one and I miss it a lot. Think all the time about getting one myself.
post #38 of 90
Man, I really want a dog.

But I dont want to go traipsing up and down the stairs to stand on a London street corner in the middle of a winter night. And I dont want to try and figure out who is going to take care of it when the woman and I go away on a holiday. And I dont want to brush dog hair off of all of my clothes.

I do love dogs, and really want one, but I'm not in a position to have one right now.

K
post #39 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by tiecollector View Post
I'll have to get my cat to pose with his leash. Walking a cat is quite difficult, I can't get mine past the porch. It doesn't help that I got him when he was 10y/o.

And yes, get a dog, as long as you and your wife want one, because you'll end up taking care of it some of the time. Teach the kids some responsibility.

ding ding ding. If you can handle the responsibility yourself then get it because that is what is going to happen.

Dogs are great however they are so inconvenient and expensive.
post #40 of 90
Thread Starter 
thank you for all the advice guys. we're (we being me and my son) thinking a small to small-med dog, some poodle combo (lab. golden, cocker) since they seem to be most hypoallergenic. the wife's biggest trepidation is what to do upon her mythical return to work (it's been 8 years) and the expense if there is any grave illness involved. no cats, as we are both highly allergic. and while i love dogs, my wife likes them but prefers other people's pets.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lee_44106 View Post
What kind of dog? size? Bigger the dog, more mess to clean up. Also, what's the excercise need of the dog? How committed are you/your sons to taking care of dog. It's gotta be walked, fed, bathed, house trained, taken to the vet....etc. It's a lot of work. I had a rottweiler. It was a lot of work. Did I mention it was a lot of work? People fantasize about all the good aspects of having a pet, but when it's 2 in the morning and the dog needs to go out and pee/shit, and there's 6" snow out, and you can't get the person who orginally wanted the dog in the first place to take the dog out, then you are stuck. This is a living being. This is not a stuffed animal or some inanimate object. Think of it as another baby/child. Are you ready for another baby/child?
post #41 of 90
They are all different. Some are a pain in the ass and some are no trouble at all. It really depends on the history of the dog. Growing up, my mom would foster strays and when no one would adopt, we'd end up keeping them. The number of dogs living with us at any one time varied from 4-6, maybe 7 once.

If you get older, sickly dogs they will be shitting and vomiting everywhere. So will puppies. As much as I don't want to advise you not to adopt, that's not the way to go if you're worried about health/behaviour issues. Get a puppy from a reputable place. While it will be a pain in the ass, at least you'll have help from your kids through its puppyhood. Once they tire of it, if you've trained it will, it will just be a good dog.

Also plan to give up wearing nice clothes if it sheds.
post #42 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by thekunk07 View Post
thank you for all the advice guys. we're (we being me and my son) thinking a small to small-med dog, some poodle combo (lab. golden, cocker) since they seem to be most hypoallergenic. the wife's biggest trepidation is what to do upon her mythical return to work (it's been 8 years) and the expense if there is any grave illness involved. no cats, as we are both highly allergic.

Medium-sized, easy maintenance, swift, smart (very smart) and seriously cool - the Basenji.



Also supposed to be easy on the allergies. Barkless, but can make a variety of unusual sounds. Will bond with family, but may be aloof with strangers. Will run any small animal done on sight (these dogs are still used to hunt in Africa), so fenced yard and a lead are necessary.

Needs a non-idiotic owner.

Or ...

Medium-sized, wily, full of vim and vigor, and character for days - this breed is at ease in the field, the barn or the pub. The Irish Terrier.



Coat needs a little maintenance, but this dog will keep your son occupied for hours and be a true companion.

Needs a mostly non-idiotic owner.

Or ...

known as "the child's nanny" this breed is a large dog in a small package. Can take serious rough play from kids - whereas the Basenji may not - as well as acting as a reasonable deterrent to those who mean your kids harm. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier.



Wash and wear. You'll have to deal with breed prejudice from the public, though. And it may be banned in your town.

Needs a non-idiotic owner, but the breed is forgiving.

All breeds have health issues, so you need to research breeders and lines. Put $30/month away for the life if the dog in case you run into major issues. You'll be covered if problems arise when the dog is older.

lefty
post #43 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
No. They are dirty and they smell. They will catch threads on your clothes when pawing at you and leave fur all over the house. Did I mention that they smell? Oh, and they also ruin furniture. My father held out for years against getting a dog. When we moved to quebec he caved for some reason. The house was never clean again.

Could you be any prissier?

Just make the more basic aspects of the animal's care your son's responsibility, and he'll develop a close connection with the dog.
post #44 of 90
Thread Starter 
first two are 2 of my favorites and great recos. thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post
Medium-sized, easy maintenance, swift, smart (very smart) and seriously cool - the Basenji.



Also supposed to be easy on the allergies. Barkless, but can make a variety of unusual sounds. Will bond with family, but may be aloof with strangers. Will run any small animal done on sight (these dogs are still used to hunt in Africa), so fenced yard and a lead are necessary.

Needs a non-idiotic owner.

Or ...

Medium-sized, wily, full of vim and vigor, and character for days - this breed is at ease in the field, the barn or the pub. The Irish Terrier.



Coat needs a little maintenance, but this dog will keep your son occupied for hours and be a true companion.

Needs a mostly non-idiotic owner.

Or ...

known as "the child's nanny" this breed is a large dog in a small package. Can take serious rough play from kids - whereas the Basenji may not - as well as acting as a reasonable deterrent to those who mean your kids harm. The Staffordshire Bull Terrier.



Wash and wear. You'll have to deal with breed prejudice from the public, though. And it may be banned in your town.

Needs a non-idiotic owner, but the breed is forgiving.

All breeds have health issues, so you need to research breeders and lines. Put $30/month away for the life if the dog in case you run into major issues. You'll be covered if problems arise when the dog is older.

lefty
post #45 of 90
I can't imagine being without a dog. They require lots of time and attention, but are a great way to teach kids responsibility.
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