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post #316 of 354
Great thread guys. Lots of terrific advice and I'm sure I'll be back here again and again in the near future.

Right now, we're looking to purchase a good stroller/carseat combo. So far, the Britex B-Agile/B-Safe one looks like the forerunner. Anyone have any experience with them or other, similar ones that you'd recommend? The Britax looks and sounds great. People just complain about the seat being heavy.

We're also looking for a good crib mattress, preferably latex.

Thanks in advance.
post #317 of 354
Having Gone through the Children thing twice and them still being a work in process may I suggest not buying a Combo. Its a royal pain in the expletive to be always removing the car seat. Also depending on how much walking you do when the wheels do get worn down the whole lot is useless. Buy a decent car seat with isofix and get a reasonably priced buggy for when you are out walking. Buggy get bashed and abused and I´ve gone through approx 3 with each Child. Man they grow up s fast, Cherish it nod[1].gif
post #318 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Great thread guys. Lots of terrific advice and I'm sure I'll be back here again and again in the near future.
Right now, we're looking to purchase a good stroller/carseat combo. So far, the Britex B-Agile/B-Safe one looks like the forerunner. Anyone have any experience with them or other, similar ones that you'd recommend? The Britax looks and sounds great. People just complain about the seat being heavy.
We're also looking for a good crib mattress, preferably latex.
Thanks in advance.

Really glad this thread got bumped. Y Ferch is supposed to arrive in 4 weeks, so I have a feeling I'll be re-reading this thread frequently.

We picked up this foam mattress for Y Ferch's crib.
post #319 of 354
Thanks guys.

Twistoffat, interesting perspective on the combo. My brother loves 'em, since they decrease the likelihood that the kid will wake up when going home. I'll check out isofix though.

Dewi, I saw that thread, but the ingredients look a little iffy. Sealy has a latex, soybean model that looks promising.

Here's the cheapest latex, wool, cotton one I've found: http://www.sleepez.com/crib.htm

May go w/ that one. Am leaning toward latex, since it's hypoallergenic and we've heard other foams off-gas toxins. Not sure how true that is though. We have a latex matress w/ wool batting and a cotton cover and it's been great.
post #320 of 354
If it hasn't been said already, circumcision is unnecessary.
post #321 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Thanks guys.

Twistoffat, interesting perspective on the combo. My brother loves 'em, since they decrease the likelihood that the kid will wake up when going home. I'll check out isofix though.



May go w/ that one. Am leaning toward latex, since it's hypoallergenic and we've heard other foams off-gas toxins. Not sure how true that is though. We have a latex matress w/ wool batting and a cotton cover and it's been great.

I certainly understand what your brother means. The reality is however that if a child wants to sleep it will and cars are great for putting them to sleep. Unfortunately there isn´t a Combo for new born babies taht either allows the car seat to grow with the child and still fit the stroller frame and vice versa. I made that mistake the first time around and let me tell you that that stuff is not what one one call cheap. Secound time around I got it right. I bought a buggy that could be adopted into a bed for children to four years(depending on the size of child. I bought a portable car seat that the child could sleep/Sit in the car. Thes seat are only good to 1.5 years anyway and have no further use. Then I bought a good flexible Car seat that can be used from 1.5 upwards.
post #322 of 354
Forgive if these have been mentioned. I didn't read all the posts.
My advice would be this:
as of this moment until the day you die, your life as you once knew it, is over.
A new life begins for the little one, your wife and yourself, etc. Every decision you make from now on will reflect upon your children and family.
Where discipline is observed, alternate roles between you and yor spouse. Take turns being the bad guy.
When the tot rejects your words and goes to your spouse for a better deal, make sure they send them right back to you with 'ask your father'. You in turn say 'ask your mother'.
Take naps every chance you get because you won't sleep normal for the next 6 years.
Make them earn every thing and priviledge instead of giving it all freely. Good habits must start early.
Praise them for telling the truth, especially where it involves them confessing.
Try to attend every single event in their lives, no matter how boring it may be for you. For them this will mean the world.
Be polite and patient and you will teach them the same by example.
Encourage them to open a bank account as soon as they are able to grasp the concept of money.
When they express an interest in working (delivering newspapers, etc) let them so they learn the value of a dollar.
After you have advised against it, let them make small mistakes that you know will hurt them. Next time they will be more likely to follow advice.
Allow them a pet and observe their behaviour towards it. This can tell you volumes about their nature.
Never use profane language in front of them or you are doomed forever.
They must understand that your role is to mentor and protect. 'Friends' only in adulthood.
If there is something embarrassing for them, share one of your own embarrassing moments to give them courage.
Never raise your voice. Rather, suggest discussion or simply state, 'I am very disappointed.'
Never end a day in anger, ever.
And the most important thing to remember is, never dress little ones in polyester or synthetics or dry clean their garments.
Interesting read on this: http://www.sixwise.com/newsletters/05/12/21/the-6-synthetic-fabrics-you-most-want-to-avoid-and-why.htm
Copy of article here (Click to show)
The 6+ Synthetic Fabrics You Most Want to Avoid, and Why
by www.SixWise.com

Fabric may not be the first thing that comes to mind when you think about living a healthier lifestyle, but it definitely should be considered. Even many "health nuts" don't realize that synthetic fabrics are teeming with chemicals and dyes that cannot be washed out, making them a potential health hazard.

Organic, all-natural fabrics like cotton, wool and linen may be the safest options when it comes to your health.

Toxins in Your Textiles

Most synthetic fabrics, from towels to dress shirts to bed linens, are treated with chemicals during and after processing. These chemicals not only leach into the environment, leaving an impact on groundwater, wildlife, air and soil, but they also may be absorbed or inhaled directly.

"The use of man-made chemicals is increasing, and at the same time we have warning signals that a variety of wildlife and human health problems are becoming more prevalent," says Dr. Richard Dixon, Head of the World Wildlife Federation (WWF) Scotland. "It is reckless to suggest there is no link between the two and give chemicals the benefit of the doubt. Urgent action is needed to replace hazardous chemicals with safer alternatives especially in clothing and other consumer products."

WWF is so concerned about one fairly new clothing additive that, in 2004, they advised parents to check their children's clothing labels. If the chemical is on it, they advise switching to clothing made from natural fibers whenever possible.

Teflon in Your Trousers

The chemicals that the WWF was warning about are perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), which include the non-stick additive Teflon. These chemicals are increasingly being added to clothing because it makes them last longer and also can make them wrinkle-free. Most clothing labeled "no-iron" contains PFCs.

The problem with PFcs?

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says that PFCs are cancer-causing compounds. However, "no-iron" and "wrinkle-free" pants have become a popular part of many schools' compulsory uniforms. Hardly the thing you'd like to send your child off to school in, but other options usually aren't provided.

PFCs in "wrinkle-free" pants, often used for school uniforms, may cause cancer, according to the EPA.

"Without knowing it, parents are exposing their children to toxic chemicals in clothing that could have serious future consequences for their health and the environment. Children are usually more vulnerable to the effects of chemicals than adults, so the presence of these substances in school clothing is particularly alarming,' says Dr. Dixon.

Your Clothing's Chemical Cocktail

You may be wondering when, and why, chemicals are applied to your clothing. The fact is, man-made fabrics are complex, and getting a soft pullover out of raw materials takes some measure of chemical manipulation. For instance:

*

Chemicals are used to make fibers suitable for spinning and weaving.
*

A formaldehyde product is often applied to prevent shrinkage. This product is applied with heat so it is trapped in the fiber permanently.
*

Petrochemical dyes, which pollute waterways, are used for color.
*

Chemicals are added to make clothing softer, wrinkle-free, fire-retardant, moth-repellant and stain-resistant.
*

Commonly used chemicals include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and dioxin-producing bleach.
*

Nylon and polyester are made from petrochemicals, whose production creates nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas that's 310 times more potent than carbon dioxide.
*

Rayon is made from wood pulp that has been treated with chemicals, including caustic soda and sulphuric acid.
*

Dye fixatives used in fabrics often come from heavy metals and pollute water systems.
*

Acrylic fabrics are polycrylonitriles, which may be carcinogenic.
*

Clothing and fabric that is treated with flame-retardant chemicals, such as children's pajamas, emit formaldehyde gas.

The chemicals used in synthetic clothing have been linked to health problems including cancer, immune system damage, behavioral problems and hormone disruption.

Synthetic Fibers to Avoid

If at all possible, it's best to stay away from the following fabrics in lieu of more natural options:

* Acrylic
* Polyester
* Rayon
* Acetate
* Triacetate
* Nylon
* Anything labeled static-resistant, wrinkle-resistant, permanent-press, no-iron, stain-proof or moth-repellant

Natural fabrics tend to breathe better than synthetic fibers and naturally wick moisture away from the body. These include:

* Cotton
* Linen
* Wool
* Cashmere
* Silk
* Hemp

If you are very sensitive to chemicals, you may want to seek out organic fabrics. Even natural fabrics, such as cotton, are treated with pesticides while they are grown, and some of those pesticides will remain in the fibers. Organic fabrics are becoming more widely available and can be found in health food markets, specialty shops and online.

More Safe Clothing Tips

Use Static Eliminator for
Soft, Non-Toxic Clothing

Typical dryer sheets are loaded with potentially toxic chemicals that can be transferred to your clothing. The Static Eliminator Reusable Dryer Sheet System is one of the most highly recommended products of all on SixWise.com because it is:

* Completely Non-Toxic
* Very Economical! Each box is highly effective for 500 loads of laundry!
* 100% Hypoallergenic
* Softens Clothes & Eliminates Static -- without any harsh toxins
* Safe for Even the Most Delicate Fabrics
* Easier to Use & Reduces Waste -- unlike conventional dryer sheets
* Won't Clog Up Your Dryer Vents

Learn more about Static Eliminator
and Order Yours Now!

*

Wash and dry synthetic fabrics three times before wearing them.
*

Do not use conventional dryer sheets, as they are loaded with toxic chemicals. An excellent alternative is Static Eliminator, a reusable dryer sheet system with woven sheets that take static cling out, and soften fabric without any toxic chemicals whatsoever.
*

Avoid dry cleaning your clothing, as perchloroethylene, the chemical most widely used in dry cleaning, is a VOC known to cause cancer in animals. There are environmentally friendly dry cleaners that do not use this chemical.
*

Wash your clothing in non-toxic detergent, such as the EnviroRite Laundry Detergent, which is non-caustic and free of petroleum solvents, fragrances and dyes.
post #323 of 354
Never make your kid/kids the sole center of your universe.
post #324 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by acidboy View Post

Never make your kid/kids the sole center of your universe.

 

My folks and most of my friends' folks had a "seen but not heard" type of exsistance when the parents were amongst other parents Nowadays, not the case at all. Kids have become the center of the everyone's universe. Our society has this bizarre child worship thing going on now.

post #325 of 354

never change the noise level in your house...once you reduce the volume on the tv or stero you are totally jacked...kid won't sleep through anything then...3 daughters and never missed a beat watching movies with friends, dancing the night away with wife and best advice i ever gave myself...the door bell never even woke them up...also eliminates that need for the silly door sign that says 'shhh. baby sleeping.'

post #326 of 354
- "Daddy, did I just eat dead pigeon?"

- "Yes."
post #327 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by twistoffat View Post

I certainly understand what your brother means. The reality is however that if a child wants to sleep it will and cars are great for putting them to sleep. Unfortunately there isn´t a Combo for new born babies taht either allows the car seat to grow with the child and still fit the stroller frame and vice versa. I made that mistake the first time around and let me tell you that that stuff is not what one one call cheap. Secound time around I got it right. I bought a buggy that could be adopted into a bed for children to four years(depending on the size of child. I bought a portable car seat that the child could sleep/Sit in the car. Thes seat are only good to 1.5 years anyway and have no further use. Then I bought a good flexible Car seat that can be used from 1.5 upwards.

Visited Babys-R-Us to "test drive" (as a friend of mine called it) the car seats and strollers. My wife thought the Britex B-Safe was too heavy to carry with a baby, so we decided to take your advice and get a dedicated car seat. Ended up buying the Evenflo Symphony 65 e3, since my wife liked its padding and looks. Seems to get good reviews online. For strollers, we liked the Combi ones best, since they fold up so small. But we decided to do more research. Almost bought a Baby Bjorn, since my brother loves his. But decided to wait on that too. There were just too many options.
post #328 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Visited Babys-R-Us to "test drive" (as a friend of mine called it) the car seats and strollers. My wife thought the Britex B-Safe was too heavy to carry with a baby, so we decided to take your advice and get a dedicated car seat. Ended up buying the Evenflo Symphony 65 e3, since my wife liked its padding and looks. Seems to get good reviews online. For strollers, we liked the Combi ones best, since they fold up so small. But we decided to do more research. Almost bought a Baby Bjorn, since my brother loves his. But decided to wait on that too. There were just too many options.

great - we did an amazing amount of research on this stuff, but its all out of date.

one thing that I would suggest - your stroller has to be able to fold and unfold with one hand. non-negotiable. try it out. you will be holding the baby in one hand on a regular basis

congratulations, by the way
post #329 of 354
^Thank you, Z. Off to an all-day newborns class!
post #330 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by emptym View Post

Visited Babys-R-Us to "test drive" (as a friend of mine called it) the car seats and strollers. My wife thought the Britex B-Safe was too heavy to carry with a baby, so we decided to take your advice and get a dedicated car seat. Ended up buying the Evenflo Symphony 65 e3, since my wife liked its padding and looks. Seems to get good reviews online. For strollers, we liked the Combi ones best, since they fold up so small. But we decided to do more research. Almost bought a Baby Bjorn, since my brother loves his. But decided to wait on that too. There were just too many options.

You made the right choice. Also when the kid gets bigger(and they do...fast) the whole lot gets very heavy. The fold up stroller/Buggy is great and believe me you won´t regret the dedicated car seat.
There is a whole market out there dedicated to seperating new parents from their hard earned cash. You ask yourself if you need it and think what our parents had wink.gif
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