or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Difference between tux and dinner jacket?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Difference between tux and dinner jacket?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
The title pretty much says it all just wondering what the differences between a tux and a dinner jacket are.
post #2 of 10
US/UK name for the same thing
post #3 of 10
I understand a dinner suit to be the traditional tux (black trousers and jacket, with all of the satin/grosgrain facing), and a dinner jacket to be a black or white formal jacket, either part of dinner suit (black) or to be worn with black formal trousers (white).
post #4 of 10
Ernest is correct. Technically, there is no such term as "dinner suit." English tailors will say "dinner jacket and trousers".
post #5 of 10
Quote:
Ernest is correct. Technically, there is no such term as "dinner suit." English tailors will say "dinner jacket and trousers".
Dammit, beat me to it. I wanted to show Manton that I was actually aware of such rules, and am not (in most cases) arguing with him out of ignorance. Of course, in the US, a "tux" denotes matching dinner jacket and trousers", while "dinner jacket" used alone often implies odd trousers (black) being worn with a non-matching jacket (usually white, cream, or some patterned thing.)
post #6 of 10
Quote:
I wanted to show Manton that I was actually aware of such rules, and am not (in most cases) arguing with him out of ignorance.
I know that. I would never dress the way you do (that should go without saying) but I think your approach is real and valid, and you are a fine (and intellectually honest) spokesman for it.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Ernest is correct. Technically, there is no such term as "dinner suit." English tailors will say "dinner jacket and trousers".
Lately, I've taken to calling the ensemble a "suit of dinner clothes." Damn if I can't bring myself to say tuxedo. And "dinner jacket and trousers" sounds so cumbersome.
post #8 of 10
If you lived in Tuxedo, New York (where, of course, the jacket came to be called a "Tuxedo") then saying Tuxedo would seem very natural.
post #9 of 10

Some 8 years after the fact...

 

My understanding, from the British tradition, is that a Tuxedo generally has a single button whereas a dinner jacket has two (or even three) and the cut is slightly different. A Tux is more rounded and looser, and a dinner jacket is more geometric and 'tailored.' Hence people being a bit sniffy about Tuxedos - they are far too relaxed!

 

In the UK the dress trousers are implied in 'dinner jacket' but 'black tie' is a common term (to distinguish from white tie, where full evening dress is worn).

 

A white jacket is... erm... questionable. 

 

Details - a cummerbund should be worn (black is conservative, burgundy a bit festive); shoes should be properly polished; white shirt, preferably formal; ideally black shirt studs and a white pocket square; black socks (although I really shouldn't have to say this); a folded collar is actually more traditional as winged collars are reserved for white tie; obviously a black bow tie, preferably self-tied, but it can match the cummerbund for a little gaiety. Outerwear should be a black overcoat and white silk scarf but no hat.

 

These are, of course, rules from the early 20th century, but I believe they hold true. The golden rule is "What would Cary Grant wear?"

post #10 of 10

qm.gifqm.gif

 

qm.gifqm.gifBilly witch doctor dot com.....more comfortable with chicken.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Difference between tux and dinner jacket?