or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › How to hand wash a sweater?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

How to hand wash a sweater? - Page 2

post #16 of 24
Most EU machines have wool programs now. I just stick them on the coldest setting and then dry on a rack. You aren't supposed to do this unless the label claims it's machine washable wool but I just do it. Obviously if you're really worried I'd get them dry cleaned.
post #17 of 24
Hand wash when necessary, which is very rarely.
post #18 of 24
Turn the garment inside out and put it inside a mesh washing bag. Wash it in a machine on the cold water gentle cycle which is really mostly soaking it with only a little agitation. Use some high quality detergent and no more than 1 oz like a shotglass. Take it out and dry flat. I hang my things on hangers to dry but the hangers are wide and have wide ends and don't leave a mark on the garment.
The problem with hand washing is that it's even harder on the garment then machine washing and that you have to squeeze the water out which may effect the shape while the machine on gentle cycle gently spins it out. A dryer sweater when it comes out can be hung on a hanger but a hand washed one has more water in it and will stretch.
post #19 of 24
If the sweater says "machine washable" than do that. If it doesn't, then don't. Even the gentlest machine wash cycle can turn a sweater into felt (although of course it's more likely to happen if you use hot water. Actually, it's guaranteed to happen if you use hot water.)

The key is not to put any strain on the fibers. You don't want to swish the sweater in the water and you definitely don't want to wring it when it's wet. After I rinse a sweater i put it in a colander to let most of the water drain out, and then I use the old roll-inside-a-towel trick to get out the rest.
post #20 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by j View Post
I have covered balconies, but the possibility of random sideways rain around here tends to rule out that option except on really nice days.

Fun fact about Seattle: the fifth day of any weather forecast is no better than random at predicting the actual weather that day. The Seattle area is the most difficult area on Earth for weather prediction.


More like easiest.

It will be 44 degrees and raining lightly. Always.

Maybe that is just Portland.
post #21 of 24
Sink, cold water. I use shampoo, which is essentially just a gentle detergent. Lightly agitate for a little bit, rinse, block and roll in a towel, and once you get most of the water out, it's a lot lighter, so it won't stretch much if you hang, but drying flat is probably still the better option. It's just like hand washing any other garment. And it's much better for the fabric than the chemicals dry cleaners use, which strip the fibers of the oils that give them their life.
post #22 of 24
What if you have a stain on a sweater? Would you still handwash or dryclean?
post #23 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Little Cletus View Post
Turn the garment inside out and put it inside a mesh washing bag. Wash it in a machine on the cold water gentle cycle which is really mostly soaking it with only a little agitation. Use some high quality detergent and no more than 1 oz like a shotglass. Take it out and dry flat. I hang my things on hangers to dry but the hangers are wide and have wide ends and don't leave a mark on the garment.
The problem with hand washing is that it's even harder on the garment then machine washing and that you have to squeeze the water out which may effect the shape while the machine on gentle cycle gently spins it out. A dryer sweater when it comes out can be hung on a hanger but a hand washed one has more water in it and will stretch.


I agree with this.

The problem with wool (and perhaps, also, cashmere, I'm not sure?) is that the fibres are covered in microscopic hooks, so agitation and squeezing, especially when wet, will make these hooks snag on each other (hence the matting and shrinking).

Fortunately, I have a newish machine, with a very good wool cycle and things come out even better, after that, than they do after a cold handwash (even though I'm very gentle, promise!).

They look brand new, or even better than brand new (i.e. slightly fuller).

For pure wool and cashmere, I would also tend to turn down the heat from the preset 40 degrees, to 30 degrees (although, I'm not sure if it's strictly necessary?).

If you have an older machine, though, or one without a very specialised wool cycle, I'd stick with the very gentle cold handwash in Woolite for Colors and then, after rinsing, rather than squeezing much at all, maybe just put it in the machine to drain (not spin), once you've finished (again, if you have that option, obviously)?
post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cchen View Post
What if you have a stain on a sweater? Would you still handwash or dryclean?


I'd still wash it, personally.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › How to hand wash a sweater?