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Looking for an expert tailor in SD - Page 2

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh
FC, I guess he didn't read your link:

At one time or another, most all Style Forum posters seem to post without reading and/or comprehending the prior posts. Additionally, I believe the SF maxim, "Without pics, it didn't happen.", is pretty telling. Text and links don't cut it with some readers. That is just the way things are. I find that when I take the time to re-post rather than offer a link, there are more responses. The same goes for a post with pictures as opposed to posting text only sans photos.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh
"One of America's top tailors" sums it up. I would think that he could obviously handle just about any alteration. You make a great point about Romeo not being a stylist/designer, but more of an artisanal quality tailor.

He sounds like the opposite of someone like a Mimmo Spanno. I would love to see some samples of his work. He's not mentioned much here or at AAAC. Since Romeo is not a stylist with a "house style", I wonder what he would do for an unsophisticated client who asked for a suit to be made? Do you suppose Romeo would tell the customer to find a look that he likes and then he would make the client a suit based on that style.

From the second paragraph of this link: May 12, 2006
http://www.styleforum.net/showpost.p...91&postcount=7

"You must tell him what you wish to achieve. Don't expect him to do more or less than you request. Unless you ask for it, he will express his opinion only when you are asking for the ridiculous, absurd, or impossible." Expanding on that thought, I would say that Romeo is glad to guide his clients by showing them samples and photos. The basted fitting will usually uncover any design misunderstandings. The forward fitting will take care of the final details. The pattern is adjusted each time and subsequent orders usually require only one fitting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rnoldh
It sounds like the bespoke items that he has made for you are an amalgam of Oxxford, Brioni, and Kiton. Would you say that your items from him are close to an Oxxford, Brioni, or Kiton silhouette, or are they definitely distinct?

The answer is in the fifth paragraph of this link: March 30, 2006
http://www.askandyaboutclothes.com/f...56&postcount=6

As that post notes, the bespoke items are a true synthesis of the elements I requested. That and ability to choose the cloth type (wool, cashmere, silk, linen, cotton), weight, weave, color/pattern you want is the primary luxury of bespoke.

Everybody has some idea of what they want before the walk into the tailor's shop. The tailor must coax that idea out of the client and turn it into the finished product. An honest tailor will tell the client whether or not he can achieve it before ever taking a measurement. Again, it comes down to building a harmonious working relationship. There is no real way to completely prevent the occasional and embarrassing Darren Beaman type of fiascos from happening. The clothing fora make certain that the charlatans' time is limited and their victims fewer. Life is filled with risk. Still and all, bespoke is not for everyone.

___
post #17 of 29
Based on a recommendation from Full Canvas, I started going to Romeo's shop in 2006, initially for alterations and later to have jackets made. By now I own, IIRC, seven jackets and a pair of trousers made by Romeo and he currently has fabric for an overcoat and a tuxedo that I plan to pick up next May. Although I no longer live in San Diego, I visit Romeo whenever I visit my brother. So Romeo and I exchange fabric books by mail, we occasionally talk on the phone, and then I go in on the first day of my visit for a fitting and return on the last day (ca. 3-4 days later) for a final fitting. Then I leave with 1-2 new jackets. Sometimes I choose fabrics for my next jackets while I'm in town. This works because Romeo has my measurements and my body doesn't change. My brother is beginning to suspect, however, that I really travel to San Diego to see Romeo and just visit him on the side! I'm extremely happy with Romeo's work because he's executed a silhouette that flatters me and the fit is better than anything else I have, including some jackets from WW Chan. Because Chan is significantly cheaper, I still use Chan for fabrics I think are likely to be less durable, such as velvet and corduroy.

Unfortunately, I don't have any pictures and I'm photographically challenged, so they're unlikely to appear. I will note, however, that when I headed out the door on New Year's Eve of 2007, my 21-year-old niece asked if I was wearing a custom jacket, so I told her that I was indeed and asked how she knew. She responded "because the back is perfect". Indeed, the jacket shows not a ripple, despite being made by Romeo from 8-9 oz. Holland & Sherry fabric with a very hard finish. I had intentionally commissioned a jacket from the fabric to challenge him, after already having him make several heavier tweed jackets. He's also a delight to work with since he's easy-going, but also not afraid to tell me if I'm asking for something that's inadvisable.
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by unpainted huffheinz
Did you ever work with Felice? I understand he was also an amazing tailor and well liked as a person. He died suddenly in an accident from what I recall.

Mr. Tony Felice was tragically killed in an automobile accident in either 2000 or 2001. He was returning from the national tailoring convention in Phoenix when the accident occurred.

He was the head tailor for Brooks Brothers main NYC store. He supervised all the other tailors in addition to doing the most challenging alterations. Mr. Felice was also a supervising tailor for the Hickey Freeman MTM group in the 1960s. Out of respect for Tony, Romeo has the old Brooks Brothers "diploma" hanging on one of the client area walls.

Mr. Felice was generally charming and personable. However, he was somewhat opinionated and short-tempered. He lacked the patience to work with me. Consequently, I never got any bespoke from his shop while he was alive. His shop did a few alterations for me on some Oxxford items somewhere around 1996 or 1997. The work was excellent. Romeo was hired because to quote Mr. Felice, "Romeo makes a better coat than I do." Romeo purchased the business from Mr. Felice's widow.

Quote:
Originally Posted by unpainted huffheinz
Do you send your old Sulka gear to the Chauvinist shop? I bought some Sulka ties there on a few visits.

Until you mentioned the place, I had not heard of Le Chauvinist. I Googled them and see they are right under my nose across from the old Bob Davis Camera location on Fay Avenue. I should go there as soon as I get back to La Jolla. They probably have a good bit of the clothes that disappeared during a remodel of our home. Not knowing why the clothes were boxed-up, the housekeeper gave a few boxes to Mary Star of the Sea church due to the misunderstanding. Who knows? Maybe you bought some of my old ties?

___
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas View Post
Until you mentioned the place, I had not heard of Le Chauvinist. I Googled them and see they are right under my nose across from the old Bob Davis Camera location on Fay Avenue. I should go there as soon as I get back to La Jolla. They probably have a good bit of the clothes that disappeared during a remodel of our home. Not knowing why the clothes were boxed-up, the housekeeper gave a few boxes to Mary Star of the Sea church due to the misunderstanding. Who knows? Maybe you bought some of my old ties? ___
The owner of Le Chauvinist, Salvatore(?), is also a very pleasant man. I've spent a fair amount of time browsing his store, trying on jackets and looking at ties (some Talbott and Sulka), though IIRC, I've only bought one pair of cufflinks from him. Which reminds me, you really should check out his collection of "snappers". In 2006, he had probably 40 pairs, which were down to about 15 by October, when I last visited. At one point, he had a beautiful turquoise silk robe with a dragon embroidered on the back that I regret not buying for $100. OTOH, I don't regret passing up the cream paisley tone-on-tone Armani suit he offered me for discount. The shoulders look like they came straight out of 1940's women's wear.
post #20 of 29
Last time I was at Le Chauvinist there was a Sulka camelhair polo coat. It looks exactly like the one pictured in your avatar!

The first time I went in there and looked around the owner asked me if I was looking for anything in particular to which I replied 'have any Sulka ties'? He said 'Oh, you want the real stuff' and disappeared to the back room returning with a tie stand with a few dozen Sulkas on it. I occasionally work with Quint gallery which is in the alley behind the flower shop on that block, so I'm only in the area once a year or so.
post #21 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by unpainted huffheinz View Post
Last time I was at Le Chauvinist there was a Sulka camelhair polo coat. It looks exactly like the one pictured in your avatar!

It is (technically was) probably my coat. It's unlikely a twin would show up in the same vicinity. It is one of the items that disappeared along with an Oxxford Guanaco overcoat and my favorite Sulka smoking jacket.

I called La Jolla an hour ago and had someone drive over to Le Chauvinist. However, they told me the store owner is not there and neither is any Sulka overcoat. The clerk told my friend that I should call on Tuesday when the owner is back in town. It seems they have a large off-site storage area.

Thank you for the tip. With some luck I might be able to purchase some of my own clothes!

___
post #22 of 29
That is kind of crazy if it turns out your clothes ended up there. I sent you a PM with some details.
post #23 of 29
Thinman and Full Canvas, you guys pain me.

In addition to some other people speaking so highly of Romeo you guys have all but convinced me that I have one of the best tailors in the world right down the street. And with a suit needed to fill a gaping void (navy 2b) I feel compelled to go to him.

Yet a bespoke suit may be slightly over the top for something I am rationalizing as an interview suit Perhaps once I remove myself from UCSD I can walk down the street and get myself a graduation gift...

... Why must you guys tempt me so...
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by unpainted huffheinz View Post
Last time I was at Le Chauvinist there was a Sulka camelhair polo coat. It looks exactly like the one pictured in your avatar!

The first time I went in there and looked around the owner asked me if I was looking for anything in particular to which I replied 'have any Sulka ties'? He said 'Oh, you want the real stuff' and disappeared to the back room returning with a tie stand with a few dozen Sulkas on it. I occasionally work with Quint gallery which is in the alley behind the flower shop on that block, so I'm only in the area once a year or so.

Thanks for the tip on this place, never heard of them, but I am excited to take a look.
post #25 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas View Post
Romeo was hired because to quote Mr. Felice, "Romeo makes a better coat than I do." Romeo purchased the business from Mr. Felice's widow.

___

That is refreshing.

A tragedy contributed to something good eventually happening!

If the Sulka overcoat in your avatar turns out to still be in that shop, Le Chauvinist's possession, that would truly be an amazing forum story.
post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by unpainted huffheinz View Post
Last time I was at Le Chauvinist there was a Sulka camelhair polo coat. It looks exactly like the one pictured in your avatar!

The first time I went in there and looked around the owner asked me if I was looking for anything in particular to which I replied 'have any Sulka ties'? He said 'Oh, you want the real stuff' and disappeared to the back room returning with a tie stand with a few dozen Sulkas on it. I occasionally work with Quint gallery which is in the alley behind the flower shop on that block, so I'm only in the area once a year or so.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Canvas
It is (technically was) probably my coat. It's unlikely a twin would show up in the same vicinity. It is one of the items that disappeared along with an Oxxford Guanaco overcoat and my favorite Sulka smoking jacket.

I called La Jolla an hour ago and had someone drive over to Le Chauvinist. However, they told me the store owner is not there and neither is any Sulka overcoat. The clerk told my friend that I should call on Tuesday when the owner is back in town. It seems they have a large off-site storage area.

Thank you for the tip. With some luck I might be able to purchase some of my own clothes!

Unpainted Huffheinz - I truly appreciate your tip. Thank you. I sent you a P.M. regarding something the shop owner asked me about you.

Over the weekend, I returned to La Jolla to await the opening of Le Chauvinist earlier today (Tuesday). My Sulka Ulster coat was nowhere to be seen . . . for the moment. In the first few minutes the owner was unable to recall the coat or any other Sulka items. With a little time and some non-threatening chat I was able to coax him to remember your visit to his shop. When I mentioned that you were doing some work with the Quint Gallery, the memory blockage suddenly broke free.

He quickly reached beneath the counter and removed a dusty Sulka gift box. I recognized the box and its contents immediately. It was one of the few ladies' scarves that Sulka offered from time to time. It was a gift from my father to my mother somewhere around 1959. Then, the owner remembered that he did have some Sulka ties in the back room. While he was back there I shouted to him that I hoped my Sulka Scottish Terrier tie was amongst them. Lo and behold, he came forth with fifteen or twenty ties on a hanger. All of them were mine and the "Scotty" was among them.

Well, the fact that I knew one of the ties before he even emerged from the shadows sealed the deal and he was comfortable. He now has a vague recollection that my Ulster coat and one of my Sulka smoking jackets may be with the ties' consignor. He offered to contact the consignor and let me know what is available. Also among the ties was a red Sulka beauty that I received as a high school graduation gift.

This should be on one of the television cold case detective shows. Stay tuned to learn how this whole mess unfolds.

___
post #27 of 29
^^^ Thats bizarre and awesome that you were able to track down some of your old stuff. Happy you were able to do so.

I will make my first visit to the shop tomorrow, hopefully.
post #28 of 29
I just spoke with the owner of Le Chauvinist, and his records show the Sulka coat is in his warehouse! It took a little more info from my past visits to jog his memory of the coat. He put it in storage right after I was there in February.
post #29 of 29
I just got my pants hemmed at Felice and Romeo is indeed a very nice person, and the in progress jackets he had on display looked fantastic already. I mentioned to him that I'm somewhat in the market for a Navy suit and even though it was the end of the day he took the time to show me several different fabrics, all if which (to my untrained hands), felt beautiful to the touch.

I've read online on both SF and other sources that higher supers (130+), while they feel great, will not wear/age as well as lower supers (100-120). Romeo, however, didn't seem concerned with a Super 160 that he showed me and stated that he would never make a suit out of a material he didn't approve of since his reputation is on the line.

I am planning on using whatever suit I end up with as primarily a wedding/fancy dinner/fancy party suit, though I'd like the ability to wear the suit whenever I want without concern about wearing it out too much, so durability is high on my priority list.

With that in mind, would you guys even consider going any higher than super 120? All signs point to Romeo being an expert at his trade, but using 160 in a suit worries me a little I could definitely tell the difference between the 160 he showed me and the 110's and 120's, though between 110-130's I couldn't really feel much difference.
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