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***The official Alden thread *** - Page 3889

post #58321 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by REguy View Post

I told myself I was done with the pre-order game, but the Leffot tankers called to me. I actually had a pair from their very first batch. Unfortunately, the larger sizes came with black rather than brown soles, so I returned them. After waiting until sometime in 2014, I hope Alden doesn't screw them up again.

I seem to remember getting on a list for a funky sounding pair of LWBs from LS ages ago, but I've completely given up on those. I believe they were #8, Plaza, brown edging, and brass eyelets.
Those Leffot Tankers have a way of doing that. They called to me too, and I answered.

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post #58322 of 87375

It seems that all Aldens are excluded from J.Crew Coupons

 

 

Screen Shot 2013-08-26 at 12.26.18 AM.png 446k .png file
post #58323 of 87375
For those of you into the Modified last, Browns of London has some shell cap toe boots and bluchers. They're expensive, so you might want to see if Moulded Shoe has your size first, but you can knock off 20% for the VAT and I also saw a free shipping worldwide shipping code.

http://www.brownsfashion.com/
post #58324 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by magneto78 View Post

It seems that all Aldens are excluded from J.Crew Coupons

 

 

Screen Shot 2013-08-26 at 12.26.18 AM.png 446k .png file

 

typically, yes. but as of two weeks ago, 20% (IIRC) off did work. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by REguy View Post

For those of you into the Modified last, Browns of London has some shell cap toe boots and bluchers. They're expensive, so you might want to see if Moulded Shoe has your size first, but you can knock off 20% for the VAT and I also saw a free shipping worldwide shipping code.

http://www.brownsfashion.com/

 

good to know. I sent a recent email to moulded to see what stock, if any, they had in ML but hadnt yet heard back.

 

thanks for the heads up!

post #58325 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcarthur View Post

ravello lhs
Great looking loafers uncle.
I'm so glad I finally got a pair.
post #58326 of 87375
I just bought a brand new pair of Alden Indy Natural CXL. When should I apply Obenauf's LP and Venetian Shoe Cream? Which should I apply first...if both are applied?
post #58327 of 87375


My first Alden - color 8 cordovan indy
post #58328 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDV View Post

Great looking loafers uncle.
I'm so glad I finally got a pair.

X2 biggrin.gif
post #58329 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawnc View Post

Equally surprising and disappointing. I just assumed that Chicago would be one of the best cities for Alden shopping. The boat tour and aquarium are already on the agenda. Thanks for all of the suggestions. You have a few that I'm sure we'll add to our agenda.

...like the Horween factory.
post #58330 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by dranguschu View Post



My first Alden - color 8 cordovan indy

Sweet. Congrats and enjoy.
post #58331 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by FENWAY View Post

...like the Horween factory.

Absolutely. We are staying downtown and I'm hoping that Horeeen is convenient and that they do tours.
post #58332 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by dranguschu View Post



My first Alden - color 8 cordovan indy
Beauties! Can't wait for mine.
post #58333 of 87375
Easily my favorite pair of calfskin Alden's and my best fitting pair of shoes, regardless of material. I picked the up on eBay and they are sized 9.5 D/EE. I don't know what this means but I'll figure it out. I've emailed alden to see if they can help with the last and retailer but was hoping that some of the keen eyes from this site might recognize the last.
post #58334 of 87375
null_zps8aa73f34.jpg
post #58335 of 87375
Quote:
Originally Posted by sevenfoldtieguy View Post

RTP: I'm pretty sure we are referring to two different things. When the old sole is removed in a resole or recraft, much of the corkbed comes off with it. The remainder of the corkbed is then scraped off of the sole-less shoe. New hot cork (chunky-mayonnaise-like in texture) is then spread over the bottom of the shoe (or bottom of the insole?), and the new outsole is then attached. I guess there is an imprint of the original owners foot on the leather insole that can not be adjusted, accept for B Nelson's specific treatment (stretching to flatten??). In the end though, I think the newly applied corkbed probably does much to create a new "imprint" or mold for whoever wears the shoe after the recraft, whether it be the original owner or new owner.

Could be the case. And again, exactly what they do step by step is something I leave to them. biggrin.gif

My thoughts were shared specifically as to the imprint on the insole. My pre-recraft insole imprint has been the same, after the recraft, every time.

A good day to one and all.

 

Sorry for the late follow up on this discussion, but that's what happens when you are absent for a few days. shog[1].gif  Regarding the cork and insole replacement during recrafting...  

 

Replacing the cork is standard operating procedure during the recrafting of a Goodyear-welted shoe.  

 

It is important to remember that the presence of cork in Goodyear-welted shoes is first and foremost to serve as a void filler.  Goodyear-welted shoes are the product of the Industrial Revolution's impact on the shoe industry.  Goodyear-welted shoes weren't invented as an improvement over existing footwear, per se.  They were an improvement in that they allowed shoes to be produced much more rapidly, thus bringing down costs (in other words, when Goodyear-welted shoes were first invented, they were the cheap shoes! eek.gif)  That's why hand-welted and bespoke shoes are still considered (and are) better than Goodyear-welted shoes.   In order for machines to accomplish what was previously only done by hand, some modifications had to be made to the manufacturing process.  Primarily, the insoles of Goodyear-welted shoes are far thinner, and rather than having a hand carved hold-fast to serve as the foundation for inseam stitching (hand-welted shoes), they have either a very thin leather "feather" or simply glued canvas gemming (Goodyear-welting).  The use of the upturned leather "feather" has largely fallen out of favor, though JM Weston still uses it, and has almost completely been replaced by canvas gemming ribs.  When Goodyear-welting was first invented, thin upturned leather "feathers" were how they were all made.  The "feather" was reinforced by gluing on canvas gemming for added strength, but sometime around WWII, the "feather" was largely eliminated, leaving only the canvas gemming to serve as the stitching point for the inseam.  

 

I say all that to give basis for why cork exists in Goodyear-welted shoes.  When the use of upturned "feathers" and subsequently gemming was introduced as the inseam stitching point, it created a rather large void between the insole and the outsole of the shoe.  This void is either non-existent or almost non-existent in hand-welted shoes.  When this void was created, they had to fill it with something, and through the course of time, cork has become the favored material.  Now that technology has progressed, shoes have progressed as well (and not necessarily in a good way).  Technology has allowed what we all call "cheap" shoes (cemented, etc.) to become mainstream.  This has made Goodyear-welted shoes nice by comparison.  Over time, marketing has taken hold and has boosted the "benefits" of cork, making all sorts of claims ranging from insulation from heat and cold to custom comfort by conforming to your feet and even antiseptic properties.  Don't get me wrong, I love my Goodyear-welted shoes, and enjoy the feeling of my imprint.  However, it is the "cheapening" of shoes during the Industrial Revolution that has made this necessary.  Hand-welted shoes have much thicker insoles (preferably cut from shoulder leather) that have an almost "fluffy" grain character that molds to your foot and forms a proper foot bed (see photos below comparing the two types of shoes).  They have to be quite thick to allow the shoemaker to carve the hold-fast on the bottom for inseam stitching.  

 

Hand-welted shoe with no void (also see how "fluffy" the grain is?):

 

Goodyear-welted shoe with visible void (also see how "compressed" the grain is?):

 

Sorry for the long post, but all this is important for understanding.   Replacing the welt is also standard operating procedure during recrafting.  This can't be done without removing and replacing the cork.

 

As for personal experiences with the imprint not changing noticeably after recrafting...

 

I would never presume to say that your experience isn't correct.  In fact, I am sure it is.  This experience does vary from person to person and pair to pair.  What I am saying, is that the above information has to be digested in order to understand why replacing the cork won't necessarily be noticeable.  Remember, It's primary purpose is void filling.  After your shoes have been well worn, your insoles have created a "memory" of sorts.  The void between the insole and outsole is decreased, because of your weight.  Therefore, it takes less cork to fill the void during recrafting.  Obviously the factory could force more cork in (which would compress the insole some and remove some of your imprint), but I don't believe that is what they do.  They simply fill the void.  Any minor change in the compression of the insole would be just that, minor, and it would likely return to it's original state within a wear or two.  Also, don't underestimate the unwillingness of the insole to be compressed during replacement of the cork, especially if you don't condition your insoles.  They harden over time as a result of drying from age and constant contact with salty perspiration.  Eventually they will crack (hopefully after a couple of decades of frequent wear, mind you).    


Edited by MoneyWellSpent - 8/26/13 at 7:39am
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