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***The official Alden thread *** - Page 3773

post #56581 of 89456
#4s are king for for me. Sorry guys. I like the reddish brown more than than the purplish brown of #8

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post #56582 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post


My friend, I agree with most of what you said.  My only issue is with your assertion/assumption that people buy shell because "it will go the extra mile."  I don't think people necessarily buy shell for its stronger more durable quality (at the very least I don't).  Good year welted shoes calf or shell can last a very long time when cared for properly.  As I said earlier, the way in which it creases and develops its own characteristic patina plays a large role for me.  In any case, one does have to wonder why some of the best shoe makers in the world (J.Lobb, E. Green, etc...) produce so little of it, or none at all.

 

This article give some good insight into your last sentence: http://howtospendit.ft.com/mens-fashion/6955-plenty-of-horsepower

 

At the same time, it is certainly espousing the durability of shell.  

post #56583 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeSpiffington View Post

Nice cigars Don L. Linen slacks maybe? Looking good.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDV View Post

great summer look donl

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post


Very nice DonL...  The sockless look with linen (I think?) pants is a solid summer staple.  Wear in great health my friend!

BeSpif and MrDV -- I promise I didn't steal your comments.  I suppose I should read ahead before posting.  Great minds think alike! smile.gif

 

BTW, love the #4 straight caps, cap tips, straight toes, etc...   stirpot.gif

post #56584 of 89456
venividivicibj: #4s are king for for me. Sorry guys. I like the reddish brown more than than the purplish brown of #8

While I completely disagree, there is a wise economic benefit to holding this position: you'll only have to buy a new pair of shoes/boots every 5 years or so*. biggrin.gif
post #56585 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by fiestaplatypus View Post






Are tassels ever made on a different last? The Aberdeen (in a loafer) is just too tight for my wide toes and low instep.

 

Copley Last - Unionmade (But not in shell)
post #56586 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by REguy View Post

Look at their website.


Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankCowperwood View Post

rotflmao.gif
Their prices for firsts are list. Just like pretty much everywhere else for pretty much every Alden.

Enjoy the visit. I've never had the pleasure of visiting TSM in person.

I did. I wasn't planning to buy an Alden anytime soon, so I hadn't researched it. An opportunity to visit TSM today came up unexpectedly so I'm going to buy 1-2 pairs assuming they have my size in seconds with little info and no time to do any research hence the seemingly lazy question - just shoe-buying excitement smile.gif

Tampatravel thanks for the detailed PM
post #56587 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post


BeSpif - I promise I didn't steal your comments. 
RTP, never use the words "promise" and "steal" in the same sentence, maybe "I have no recollection of said misappropriation" would be less incriminating. :-)
post #56588 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post

 In any case, one does have to wonder why some of the best shoe makers in the world (J.Lobb, E. Green, etc...) produce so little of it, or none at all.

 

This article give some good insight into your last sentence: http://howtospendit.ft.com/mens-fashion/6955-plenty-of-horsepower

 

At the same time, it is certainly espousing the durability of shell.  

MoneyWS, thanks for bringing this article to the thread.  As to the issue at hand (durability of shell cordovan), I may be mistaken, but the author of the piece seems to be equating shell cordovan with horse hide, which would be incorrect, right?  The World War I boots were made form horse hide, not shell.  Does shell cordovan possess the same durability qualities as horse hide? I don't know, but maybe you or someone else well-read in the industry could chime in to clarify.

 

As to the article addressing demand, a very limited # of tanneries processing shell, and the entry of a reputable British tannery entering the mix, this is certainly encouraging.  Sounds like higher end British shoe makers want to get into the shell game (no pun intended).  With Joseph Clayton & Sons moving to produce shell, maybe more tanneries will see the profitability and do the same.  Could this mean more available shell?  Reduction in price due to a potentially greater supply?  I suppose all of this is contingent upon the availability of horses @rses. (BTW, Washingotn DC and American politics have an abundance, but that's another issue for another thread  smile.gif).  I guess we shall see...

post #56589 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by BeSpiffington View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post


BeSpif - I promise I didn't steal your comments. 
RTP, never use the words "promise" and "steal" in the same sentence, maybe "I have no recollection of said misappropriation" would be less incriminating. :-)


rotflmao.gif

post #56590 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post

MoneyWS, thanks for bringing this article to the thread.  As to the issue at hand (durability of shell cordovan), I may be mistaken, but the author of the piece seems to be equating shell cordovan with horse hide, which would be incorrect, right?  The World War I boots were made form horse hide, not shell.  Does shell cordovan possess the same durability qualities as horse hide? I don't know, but maybe you or someone else well-read in the industry could chime in to clarify.

 

As to the article addressing demand, a very limited # of tanneries processing shell, and the entry of a reputable British tannery entering the mix, this is certainly encouraging.  Sounds like higher end British shoe makers want to get into the shell game (no pun intended).  With Joseph Clayton & Sons moving to produce shell, maybe more tanneries will see the profitability and do the same.  Could this mean more available shell?  Reduction in price due to a potentially greater supply?  I suppose all of this is contingent upon the availability of horses @rses. (BTW, Washingotn DC and American politics have an abundance, but that's another issue for another thread  smile.gif).  I guess we shall see...

 

I had noticed that as well.  I think it was just a poor choice of words, rather than ignorance of the author and his sources.  He calls them cordovan later in the paragraph.  I don't think Edward Green would be unaware of the difference either.  Horsehide is definitely not equal to shell cordovan.  The rest of the hide is used for other purposes, just as other leathers are.  I don't know of any special durability that regular horsehide has over cowhide, and I don't think the statistic regarding the war boots would exist if they were simply regular horsehide.  

post #56591 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoneyWellSpent View Post

 

I had noticed that as well.  I think it was just a poor choice of words, rather than ignorance of the author and his sources.  He calls them cordovan later in the paragraph.  I don't think Edward Green would be unaware of the difference either.  Horsehide is definitely not equal to shell cordovan.  The rest of the hide is used for other purposes, just as other leathers are.  I don't know of any special durability that regular horsehide has over cowhide, and I don't think the statistic regarding the war boots would exist if they were simply regular horsehide.  

Why not?

 

While I think your poor-choice-of-words response could be true, I find it hard to believe that shell cordovan boots were mass produced for WWI soldiers given only one pair of shoes could come from one horse.  It seems much more plausible that horse hides were used as the article actually reports. (I do recognize that I could be wrong here.) Also, I don't think EG desires to move into the shell market for its durability, but rather for its growing demand. Shells could be as delicate as silk, and EG would make them into shoes if there is demand at that price level.  In any case, this was a nice piece to read.

post #56592 of 89456
This is one of those questions where the answer seems obvious but sine I couldn't find an answer on the web, I figured I'd ask the community in hopes that my expected answer is incorrect.

For those of you who use a deer bone to help maintain your shell's, do you have separate ones for each shade? Up to this point I've only owned #8's but recently picked up a pair of whiskey's.
post #56593 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReppTiePrepster View Post

Why not?

 

While I think your poor-choice-of-words response could be true, I find it hard to believe that shell cordovan boots were mass produced for WWI soldiers given only one pair of shoes could come from one horse.  It seems much more plausible that horse hides were used as the article actually reports. (I do recognize that I could be wrong here.) Also, I don't think EG desires to move into the shell market for its durability, but rather for its growing demand. Shells could be as delicate as silk, and EG would make them into shoes if there is demand at that price level.  In any case, this was a nice piece to read.

 

I should clarify that statement.  What I was meaning was simply that I don't think more boots from WWI would exist than WWII boots if they were simply made from regular horsehide.  I've never heard that regular horsehide is more durable than cowhide.  If it were, I think it would be far more prevalent today.  

 

I agree that EG isn't in it for durability.  The more shoes they sell, the better off they are.  However, the article is pretty clear that shell cordovan was a "normal" material for shoes and boots in Europe back then, before resources started drying up in the 1930's (most cordovan was produced in Germany).  I think the article is definitely saying that cordovan was the preferred material for army boots at the time, for it's durability.  Don't forget that horse meat and horses in general were far more prevalent back then when horses were the primary mode of transportation and were used for all kinds of work.  It was a different time.  Just about everyone owned a horse or two (or more).  They were "necessary" for daily life.  


Edited by MoneyWellSpent - 8/7/13 at 9:18am
post #56594 of 89456
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrankCowperwood View Post


rotflmao.gif
Their prices for firsts are list. Just like pretty much everywhere else for pretty much every Alden.

Enjoy the visit. I've never had the pleasure of visiting TSM in person.

 

 The store is actually very surprising, at least to me. It's located in the middle of nowhere Norwalk, CT and not close to the "downtown," if the one block of shops/restaurants qualifies as such. The store has always been relatively empty when I've gone, but I have gone at odd hours. I do believe a majority of their business must be online sales. 

Half the store is dedicated random sneakers and flip flops. The other half, however, is exactly what you'd expect. Two full walls of Alden, with one dedicated to Shell Cordovan. They also have AE's and Carmina (which were on sale last time I visited.) As mentioned, Alden Irregulars line the back walls by size.

Best of all the SA's are incredibly friendly and knowledgeable. No pressure sales here. 

 

Enjoy the visit Deburn!

post #56595 of 89456

The day I was there, they were filming video of someone talking about certain Alden models.


I'd expect those will show up somewhere on the website in the future.
 

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