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***The official Alden thread *** - Page 2346

post #35176 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElDave View Post

I really don't mind the two-week summer shutdown. I do with wish they'd get out of the 50s with their communication though.
Then again, I guess that's part of their "charm."

While I don't think this is part of their strategic marketing, I do believe it does work to their advantage...their "charm" and the rarity and hype surrounding their rare releases. Judging on how quickly they ALWAYS sell out, I don't foresee them changing, or wanting to, anytime soon.

As far as the vacation, its probably more for the owners and big wigs just as much, if not more so, than for their employees. I'm pretty sure Alden is a union shop so two weeks vaca for longtime employees seems way too short.
post #35177 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

Love the Aberdeen last. Have this in the boot version and the color is incredible. The NST took some getting used to.

Do you mean you had to warm up to the style?
post #35178 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkRanger View Post

While I don't think this is part of their strategic marketing, I do believe it does work to their advantage...their "charm" and the rarity and hype surrounding their rare releases. Judging on how quickly they ALWAYS sell out, I don't foresee them changing, or wanting to, anytime soon.
As far as the vacation, its probably more for the owners and big wigs just as much, if not more so, than for their employees. I'm pretty sure Alden is a union shop so two weeks vaca for longtime employees seems way too short.

Also note that Alden is a union factory.
post #35179 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkRanger View Post


People who care about their employees, and themselves enough to realize that money isn't everything. I'd much rather spend time with my wife and kids than know I have an extra few thousand dollars in the bank, and somewhere most people in our country have lost that. I'm glad they shut down for the two weeks, and wished it would be longer for their workers' sakes, and gladly will pay and wait for delays to know they treat their workers as humans and not money making machines.

Too idealistic. I'm VP of operations/engineering at a large manufacturer (large industrial machinery) 27 miles down the road from Alden. We do soup to nuts manufacturing (Raw steel in one door of facility, finished product out the other door that ships world wide, with full staff engineering,), one of the few left of what was many years ago.

 

Shut downs have nothing to do with "caring about the worker". They work to the benefit of the company; as someone said maintenance, retooling, etc. And from an accounting standpoint, it wipes a lot of vacation off the books all at once and helps my supervisors from a planning standpoint. Many workers actually do not like it, as it forces them to take vacation time, as taking vacation time is mandatory during shut downs. As we have been in business for over 40 years, some of the older people head off to Portugal (large Portuguese work force) during shut down, but the younger one's sort of chafe at being forced to take vacation time. In the last 3 years because of our increasing backlog, I have cancelled the shut down, but have noticed the increasing maintenance issues on some of our larger more complex manufacturing equipment, many of our lasers. Our sheet metal department runs 7 days per week, 24 hours per day.

 

As for "wishing it was longer", my manufacturing staff (157 direct labor, meaning hourly) would be pissed. It would mean using up 1) more vacation or 2) being unpaid. Someone said that we "already work too hard" or something to that effect. During the financial crisis I had to take down manufacturing to 4 days per week to save jobs, and the general morale was just bad. I'd walk the floor and it was tough. Some of the best times are when we are cranking and my OT is climbing.

 

Just an ops executives insight. I'm a big fan of USA built goods (as you can tell from my job) and come from a long line of "made in USA"; father worked for Morse Twist Drill for many years (the twist drill was invented in MA) before the union there destroyed the company (my father was a union member his whole life, and you won't find a more non-union guy out there), and my brother is Operations Manager for a union steel plant in MA as well. My plant is non-union.

 

Sorry to turn this into an Ops 101 class.

post #35180 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Costa View Post

Too idealistic. I'm VP of operations/engineering at a large manufacturer (large industrial machinery) 27 miles down the road from Alden. We do soup to nuts manufacturing (Raw steel in one door of facility, finished product out the other door that ships world wide, with full staff engineering,), one of the few left of what was many years ago.

Shut downs have nothing to do with "caring about the worker". They work to the benefit of the company; as someone said maintenance, retooling, etc. And from an accounting standpoint, it wipes a lot of vacation off the books all at once and helps my supervisors from a planning standpoint. Many workers actually do not like it, as it forces them to take vacation time, as taking vacation time is mandatory during shut downs. As we have been in business for over 40 years, some of the older people head off to Portugal (large Portuguese work force) during shut down, but the younger one's sort of chafe at being forced to take vacation time. In the last 3 years because of our increasing backlog, I have cancelled the shut down, but have noticed the increasing maintenance issues on some of our larger more complex manufacturing equipment, many of our lasers. Our sheet metal department runs 7 days per week, 24 hours per day.

As for "wishing it was longer", my manufacturing staff (157 direct labor, meaning hourly) would be pissed. It would mean using up 1) more vacation or 2) being unpaid. Someone said that we "already work too hard" or something to that effect. During the financial crisis I had to take down manufacturing to 4 days per week to save jobs, and the general morale was just bad. I'd walk the floor and it was tough. Some of the best times are when we are cranking and my OT is climbing.

Just an ops executives insight. I'm a big fan of USA built goods (as you can tell from my job) and come from a long line of "made in USA"; father worked for Morse Twist Drill for many years (the twist drill was invented in MA) before the union there destroyed the company (my father was a union member his whole life, and you won't find a more non-union guy out there), and my brother is Operations Manager for a union steel plant in MA as well. My plant is non-union.

Sorry to turn this into an Ops 101 class.

Educational post. I enjoyed reading your perspective
post #35181 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Papa Doble View Post

Do you mean you had to warm up to the style?

Yeah. I purchased it on a whim because I got it for a great price (new) but them took a couple of months to get used to. It's just an odd looking style. Kind of reminds me of a hoof
post #35182 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post

Yeah. I purchased it on a whim because I got it for a great price (new) but them took a couple of months to get used to. It's just an odd looking style. Kind of reminds me of a hoof
this.

confused.gif

like a moose knuckle/camel toe
post #35183 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Costa View Post

Too idealistic. I'm VP of operations/engineering at a large manufacturer (large industrial machinery) 27 miles down the road from Alden. We do soup to nuts manufacturing (Raw steel in one door of facility, finished product out the other door that ships world wide, with full staff engineering,), one of the few left of what was many years ago.

Shut downs have nothing to do with "caring about the worker". They work to the benefit of the company; as someone said maintenance, retooling, etc. And from an accounting standpoint, it wipes a lot of vacation off the books all at once and helps my supervisors from a planning standpoint. Many workers actually do not like it, as it forces them to take vacation time, as taking vacation time is mandatory during shut downs. As we have been in business for over 40 years, some of the older people head off to Portugal (large Portuguese work force) during shut down, but the younger one's sort of chafe at being forced to take vacation time. In the last 3 years because of our increasing backlog, I have cancelled the shut down, but have noticed the increasing maintenance issues on some of our larger more complex manufacturing equipment, many of our lasers. Our sheet metal department runs 7 days per week, 24 hours per day.

As for "wishing it was longer", my manufacturing staff (157 direct labor, meaning hourly) would be pissed. It would mean using up 1) more vacation or 2) being unpaid. Someone said that we "already work too hard" or something to that effect. During the financial crisis I had to take down manufacturing to 4 days per week to save jobs, and the general morale was just bad. I'd walk the floor and it was tough. Some of the best times are when we are cranking and my OT is climbing.

Just an ops executives insight. I'm a big fan of USA built goods (as you can tell from my job) and come from a long line of "made in USA"; father worked for Morse Twist Drill for many years (the twist drill was invented in MA) before the union there destroyed the company (my father was a union member his whole life, and you won't find a more non-union guy out there), and my brother is Operations Manager for a union steel plant in MA as well. My plant is non-union.

Sorry to turn this into an Ops 101 class.

Cool perspective i never really thought about.

Fair enough. I guess I was being a bit naive to think that it was for the workers, but seeing how "old school" Alden is, it wouldn't surprise me if the guys who do run the show put up with the headache, and possible lost revenue, to just get away for a few weeks. That whole "money isn't everything" idea...
post #35184 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by smdbitchh View Post

they all seemed to be in great condition. they were all the same size, fit me well, and all appeared to be cordovan. shop has them each listed for $250. i know they retail for around $600, but would you still consider it a good deal? are any of these harder to find than the others? thanks

Im not big on used shoes, but If they fit well and seem clean on the inside, I'd consider them, but it looks like the #8 has some creasing on the toe cap - generally not a good thing. They'd probably sell for the 250 to 300 range on the 'bay.
Edited by bucksfan - 9/22/12 at 1:14pm
post #35185 of 99265

My cigar NST

 

 

 

post #35186 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkRanger View Post


Cool perspective i never really thought about.
Fair enough. I guess I was being a bit naive to think that it was for the workers, but seeing how "old school" Alden is, it wouldn't surprise me if the guys who do run the show put up with the headache, and possible lost revenue, to just get away for a few weeks. That whole "money isn't everything" idea...

Most factories shut down for 2 weeks a year. Some do 2 weeks at a time: some do 1 week in summer; 1 week in winter. As stated above it has nothing to do with workers. There is a lot of maintenance and inventory, etc... Most places make you use vacation time for the shut downs, but they also give additional time

post #35187 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by NAMOR View Post


Educational post. I enjoyed reading your perspective

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewYorkRanger View Post


Cool perspective i never really thought about.
Fair enough. I guess I was being a bit naive to think that it was for the workers, but seeing how "old school" Alden is, it wouldn't surprise me if the guys who do run the show put up with the headache, and possible lost revenue, to just get away for a few weeks. That whole "money isn't everything" idea...

 

Thank you. As a 3 year lurker before signing up last year, I rarely post, as I feel I don't have much to contribute compared to you guys, who in my opinion have a "Doctorates in Dress". This forum is a daily read for me, so I take away a lot, so I'm very thankful to those who post. NYR, I have been following your post's not only sartorially, but post's about your class size and your family tree back to Italy. Great, great stuff.

 

I was having a conversation about "made in the USA" goods a few months ago with a few of my managers, and its quite a conundrum. Within a 30 mile radius of my plant, you can purchase shoes (Alden) and shirts (New England Shirt Company) along with with a Joseph Abboud stitch house that makes suits in New Bedford, MA, a few exits down from Aldens facility. If one was to be so inclined, one could purchase most clothing articles made by possible neighbors. You could even purchase bedding (sheets, etc) from Matouk, made in our industrial park. All made and manufactured in the USA.

 

The problem? Price. Aldens, non-shells, run in the $300 dollar range, NE shirts run in the $125 range, and while Abboud is frowned upon here, for most, its considered high end. Even AE's (made in WI) are up there for most. To support "made in the USA", its very, very expensive to most. While most here "invest" in our clothing, its the exception, not the rule. Most of my (close to or above) six figure engineers still buy cheap china made shoes because they can get them for $100, never mind a line worker making $15-$20 per hour.

 

In order to maintain a manufacturing facility in the US, never mind here in New England outside of Boston, its very expensive. How do you support local made goods when, in order to pay the salary's, healthcare, benefits, OH, etc., the price of the goods make it unattainable for most at best, or a bad financial decision at worst, to purchase these goods? Its a really hard question to answer. Came up in many MBA classes, and when I studied operations at MIT. Its a question of economics. I'd love to know the average income of the person who purchases Alden shoes, we'd all be blown away I'm sure. I wish I had the answer.

 

I sit on a Business Advisory Board, and its a constant topic of conversation. On that board is the CEO of Matouk, who is expanding his operations, but its to a higher end clientele. He is currently melding operations in the USA along with overseas operations, and using the "a rising tide lifts all boats" strategy; an increase in business will increase production both overseas and domestically. He is proving it works, and workers here realize it, and appreciate his efforts. It allows him to contain cost, and try to increase market share (sell to a not-so high end customer).

 

But I do see a shift, and its shifting back to goods being made here. 

 

Wow, am I rambling. Sorry.

 

This probably belongs in the "Made in USA" thread in MC, but its interesting to think about, and will effect us and our children.

 

I'm sorry if I'm derailing this thread, just something I'm very passionate about. I will stop now...lol.

post #35188 of 99265
Anyone have experience with the "TruFlare" last? It appears that it would be a similar fit to Barrie/TruBalance.

I'm liking this nubuck offering from Tassels



post #35189 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by smdbitchh View Post

they all seemed to be in great condition. they were all the same size, fit me well, and all appeared to be cordovan. shop has them each listed for $250. i know they retail for around $600, but would you still consider it a good deal? are any of these harder to find than the others? thanks

Seems like top dollar. I don't think they would sell for more even on ebay. Personally I would consider the cigar cap toes for a little less, like 200? Mainly because I need the color. Otherwise what's the incentive.
post #35190 of 99265
Quote:
Originally Posted by Costa View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Thank you. As a 3 year lurker before signing up last year, I rarely post, as I feel I don't have much to contribute compared to you guys, who in my opinion have a "Doctorates in Dress". This forum is a daily read for me, so I take away a lot, so I'm very thankful to those who post. NYR, I have been following your post's not only sartorially, but post's about your class size and your family tree back to Italy. Great, great stuff.

I was having a conversation about "made in the USA" goods a few months ago with a few of my managers, and its quite a conundrum. Within a 30 mile radius of my plant, you can purchase shoes (Alden) and shirts (New England Shirt Company) along with with a Joseph Abboud stitch house that makes suits in New Bedford, MA, a few exits down from Aldens facility. If one was to be so inclined, one could purchase most clothing articles made by possible neighbors. You could even purchase bedding (sheets, etc) from Matouk, made in our industrial park. All made and manufactured in the USA.

The problem? Price. Aldens, non-shells, run in the $300 dollar range, NE shirts run in the $125 range, and while Abboud is frowned upon here, for most, its considered high end. Even AE's (made in WI) are up there for most. To support "made in the USA", its very, very expensive to most. While most here "invest" in our clothing, its the exception, not the rule. Most of my (close to or above) six figure engineers still buy cheap china made shoes because they can get them for $100, never mind a line worker making $15-$20 per hour.

In order to maintain a manufacturing facility in the US, never mind here in New England outside of Boston, its very expensive. How do you support local made goods when, in order to pay the salary's, healthcare, benefits, OH, etc., the price of the goods make it unattainable for most at best, or a bad financial decision at worst, to purchase these goods? Its a really hard question to answer. Came up in many MBA classes, and when I studied operations at MIT. Its a question of economics. I'd love to know the average income of the person who purchases Alden shoes, we'd all be blown away I'm sure. I wish I had the answer.

I sit on a Business Advisory Board, and its a constant topic of conversation. On that board is the CEO of Matouk, who is expanding his operations, but its to a higher end clientele. He is currently melding operations in the USA along with overseas operations, and using the "a rising tide lifts all boats" strategy; an increase in business will increase production both overseas and domestically. He is proving it works, and workers here realize it, and appreciate his efforts. It allows him to contain cost, and try to increase market share (sell to a not-so high end customer).

But I do see a shift, and its shifting back to goods being made here. 

Wow, am I rambling. Sorry.

This probably belongs in the "Made in USA" thread in MC, but its interesting to think about, and will effect us and our children.

I'm sorry if I'm derailing this thread, just something I'm very passionate about. I will stop now...lol.

Awesome. Another example of this is Filson, whose latest catalogue features a whole bunch more USA Made goods, without much of an uptick in price.
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