Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › ***The official Alden thread *** Share enthusiasm, reviews, sizing, advice, and photos.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

***The official Alden thread *** Share enthusiasm, reviews, sizing, advice, and photos. - Page 5475  

post #82111 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by rhythm View Post


The vamps on those are already creased. Did they sell them to you like that???

 

I actually didn't notice at first.  I did have them on for a while in the store and was walking around to make sure the fit was good.

post #82112 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omert4 View Post

It is not because of them being "better clothed." It's everything in even how they look making the shoe compared to the employees at C&J. Look at the clicker at C&J. Yeah, that's why C&J calf is way better than Alden calf. 

I did not bring up work ethic or ability level. You guys are just assuming I meant that.

The employees just look to me not as sophisticated sartorially as the C&J employees. Whether or not that's actually true, I don't know. It's a guess. I believe, however, that if you love or have more personal interest in what you make, the more likely hood of better results and attention to detail. When you have a guy wearing on a gangsta ecko shirt (the rhino on the shirt), it might be safe to assume he doesn't even give a shit whether or not his own shoes are goodyear welted.

I doubt Alden employees could make it in an EG factory.

Also, despite what you learned in preschool all the way to college, it's perfectly ok to make generalizations about someone. It doesn't mean you accept the generalizations as fact, but do not ignore your gut and keep it in mind when getting to know someone. If I saw a guy with a shaved head and a swastika tattooed to his face, you are damn right that I and all of you will make generalizations about that person, whether or not you want to admit it.

Welcome to the forum, Mr. Sterling. I didn't know you wore Aldens. Btw, you really should sell the Clippers
Edited by thebeebs - 5/16/14 at 8:59pm
post #82113 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye Nation View Post
 

 

Pretty much how it works for me too...

 

As somebody who spends lots of time in factories all over the world, very little of this has to do with the workers themselves.  It doesn't matter how they dress or look, their management sets the tone for what is acceptable on all fronts quality being just one; there is likely a QC group that audits quality regularly per their standards.

 

The entire premise that its down to the workers is silly.

 

BN

It's the workers pride that sets the tone. No amount of management enforcement or quality standards can make someone produce a quality product.

You plain and simply have to care about what it is your doing as a career regardless if your the CEO or a general laborer.

 

PS. I dont agree with Omert4 in any way shape or form. Nor am I saying I having anything against Alden or their workers.

post #82114 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbo316 View Post

It's the workers pride that sets the tone. No amount of management enforcement or quality standards can make someone produce a quality product.
You plain and simply have to care about what it is your doing as a career regardless if your the CEO or a general laborer.

PS. I dont agree with Omert4 in any way shape or form. Nor am I saying I having anything against Alden or their workers.

I spend nearly all of my time is factories, all over the world - and in my experience, it's not the workforce that sets the pace of these things. You can have workers that have more pride in what they do than others, naturally, but it is management that sets the culture for what is accepted, plant to plant, country to country. I can say in my experience, this is nearly always the same.

To explain my point differently - one thing we point out here is, for example, is the "splotches" on the edge trim - things of this nature. My guess is that for the QA standards, this isn't a defect, and as such, the general workforce would never see it as a problem. So it isn't a matter of being sloppy or pride in your work, it's just not viewed as a defect internally to their system and processes.

Of course I could be off base, because manufacturing shoes are not my thing specifically.
post #82115 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by zargoz View Post

Having an issue with the speedhooks on my J Crew PCTs... some of them seem to be pulling loose.  These are about a year old, worn maybe two dozen times, I don't lace them all that tight.  Can any cobbler fix this, or does it have to go back to the factory?




The good thing about J Crew is that their customer service is awesome. Bring those boots in and they will replace them for you, I'm sure.

I've had the same problem with 2 pair of boots (and a 3rd is developing). They've both had to go back to the factory.
post #82116 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by HolaDR View Post

I actually didn't notice at first.  I did have them on for a while in the store and was walking around to make sure the fit was good.

I was under the impression that most Alden dealers try to prevent their customers from trying on shoes in such a way that causes the vamps to crease. I know that if I were to open a box of $500-800 Alden's and the vamps were creased I'd send them right back. I understand I t's kindve a catch 22 because you want to make sure they fit right when you're paying that much, but if they don't fit, the store or the next customer is kindve screwed.
post #82117 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye Nation View Post


I spend nearly all of my time is factories, all over the world - and in my experience, it's not the workforce that sets the pace of these things. You can have workers that have more pride in what they do than others, naturally, but it is management that sets the culture for what is accepted, plant to plant, country to country. I can say in my experience, this is nearly always the same.

To explain my point differently - one thing we point out here is, for example, is the "splotches" on the edge trim - things of this nature. My guess is that for the QA standards, this isn't a defect, and as such, the general workforce would never see it as a problem. So it isn't a matter of being sloppy or pride in your work, it's just not viewed as a defect internally to their system and processes.

Of course I could be off base, because manufacturing shoes are not my thing specifically.

I work in the food industry in the US which has insanely strict quality regulations.

I usually dont travel the world but I have been just every major midwestern city in the US.

Now matter how many quality plans you have in place or how strict or not strict management is, if the people working on all levels are not playing as a team and ultimately do not care about what they are making it wont be a good product.

You can set a million quality regulations and believe me most factories have them, and things will still slip through the cracks.

Even in the world of QA, your relying on a QA employee do properly do their QC checks and sign off. If they do not care about the product or the workplace they can just sign the form without even looking at it.

And as much as "management sets the tone" they cant just fire everybody. You cant force employees to care.

 

Look at the best company's to work for in the US > Google, Apple etc....

Every single one of those scores the highest marks from employee satisfaction and subsequently is extremely sucessful in making money.

Point being the employees care, they take pride in what it is that they do, so a good product comes out the end.

 

I agree with you thou on the splotches thing to an extent.

Most workplaces encourage their employees to be forthcomming and innovative. For example you manufacturer cereal per say. There is a tolerance for how many burnt pieces or mixed pieces can be in a bushel. At any time an employee that extrudes this cereal everyday can say. You know it just doesnt look right to me, and the product goes through a series of more extensive testing. Now it wouldnt have had those tests if that specific employee didnt take pride it what he was producing enough to put his foot down. It met specs, but due to 20 years experience he/she knew something wasnt right.

 

Customers relate to this kind of stuff. If you opened a bag of cheerios and half were burnt, would you buy the brand again?

post #82118 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by thebeebs View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Omert4 View Post

It is not because of them being "better clothed." It's everything in even how they look making the shoe compared to the employees at C&J. Look at the clicker at C&J. Yeah, that's why C&J calf is way better than Alden calf. 

I did not bring up work ethic or ability level. You guys are just assuming I meant that.

The employees just look to me not as sophisticated sartorially as the C&J employees. Whether or not that's actually true, I don't know. It's a guess. I believe, however, that if you love or have more personal interest in what you make, the more likely hood of better results and attention to detail. When you have a guy wearing on a gangsta ecko shirt (the rhino on the shirt), it might be safe to assume he doesn't even give a shit whether or not his own shoes are goodyear welted.

I doubt Alden employees could make it in an EG factory.

Also, despite what you learned in preschool all the way to college, it's perfectly ok to make generalizations about someone. It doesn't mean you accept the generalizations as fact, but do not ignore your gut and keep it in mind when getting to know someone. If I saw a guy with a shaved head and a swastika tattooed to his face, you are damn right that I and all of you will make generalizations about that person, whether or not you want to admit it.

Welcome to the forum, Mr. Sterling. I didn't knew you wore Aldens. Btw, you really should sell the Clippers

crackup[1].gif
post #82119 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbo316 View Post
 

 

Look at the best company's to work for in the US > Google, Apple etc....

Every single one of those scores the highest marks from employee satisfaction and subsequently is extremely sucessful in making money.

Point being the employees care, they take pride in what it is that they do, so a good product comes out the end.

 

 

 

When Steve Jobs was building Apple back in the 80s, he made a point of not hiring "IBM types" because he wanted Apple to have a culture of innovation and IBM at the time was the typical slow moving, uninspiring corporation that maintained the status quo. He wanted to create a culture at Apple that encouraged innovation, and that starts with hiring the RIGHT people. Steve Jobs would've considered Buckeye Nation a bozo.

 

If I were starting a shoe company, I'd want a certain culture in place. Viberg has it right. You can tell those guys live and breathe their product, though they need to hire someone specifically for customer relations online. The employees at Alden? Not so much. Their work proves it.

 

But hey, I am Donald Sterling and the current leader of the KKK. I am an ignorant fool and what do I know.


Edited by Omert4 - 5/16/14 at 8:39pm
post #82120 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoosicPa View Post


Unfortunately Omert just doesn't seem to understand his own ignorance. When it comes to overall quality control, I don't necessarily disagree with his position. Sometimes it is less that satisfactory. The issue I had with his comment s that he determines that the Alden workers are somehow less sophisticated than their C&J counterparts based upon the way they look in a video he saw. He even states that the C&J workers "seem more sophisticated and more the type who enjoy high end shoes" as opposed to their Alden counterparts.

Well, I think that those who know me here on SF know I enjoy some high end shoes, including Lobb, EG, Cleverley, Foster & Son and yes Aldens.... but I would say that if you saw me on a Saturday mowing my lawn, according to Omert's juvenile logic, I would seem unsophisticated enough to enjoy high end shoes.

Oh well, at least he has pledged to take his juvenile logic elsewhere.

 

Right. Because I expect you to mow your lawn wearing on a bespoke suit and bespoke John Lobb shoes. I wanted to bow out of this thread because I didn't want to spoil it by debating you fools but the crap you guys are saying makes me facepalm. If you guys have anything further to say about me or my thoughts, PM me and we can debate there, not in this thread.

post #82121 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrDV View Post

I have my pants tailored to 15 in with no break.
barrie with slim (to me) pants

Your combos always look good dv. I also prefer slim (not skinny) pants with no break and personally think Alden's look great when paired that way.
post #82122 of 122416

I dont agree with saying the way people look or dress effects their work ethic or the product produced.

 

Its their personal choice.

Maybe they drive a Lambo and have a house in the Hamptons and thats how they choose to spend their cash...

 

Many of us on here have beautiful Alden, Tricker, EG, Carmina shoes but the rest of the clothing is just normal.

Hobbies and tastes are just that. Nice shoes doesnt automatically equal nice pants, nice shirts, etc.

Saying they should or they have to is absurd.

post #82123 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by zippyh View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Omert4 View Post



Look, you guys don't like what I have to say. That's fine. You're not gonna change my mind, and I am not gonna change your mind.

I'm now gonna bow out of this thread of Alden circle jerking.

Famous last words.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Omert4 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by MoosicPa View Post


Right. Because I expect you to mow your lawn wearing on a bespoke suit and bespoke John Lobb shoes. I wanted to bow out of this thread because I didn't want to spoil it by debating you fools but the crap you guys are saying makes me facepalm. 

How did we know you'd be back?
post #82124 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omert4 View Post

If I were starting a shoe company, I'd want a certain culture in place. Viberg has it right. You can tell those guys live and breathe their product. The employees at Alden? Not so much. Their work proves it.

For what its worth, I have even heard Alden retailers express similar dissatisfaction with Alden.
post #82125 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobbo316 View Post

I work in the food industry in the US which has insanely strict quality regulations.
I usually dont travel the world but I have been just every major midwestern city in the US.
Now matter how many quality plans you have in place or how strict or not strict management is, if the people working on all levels are not playing as a team and ultimately do not care about what they are making it wont be a good product.
You can set a million quality regulations and believe me most factories have them, and things will still slip through the cracks.
Even in the world of QA, your relying on a QA employee do properly do their QC checks and sign off. If they do not care about the product or the workplace they can just sign the form without even looking at it.
And as much as "management sets the tone" they cant just fire everybody. You cant force employees to care.

Look at the best company's to work for in the US > Google, Apple etc....
Every single one of those scores the highest marks from employee satisfaction and subsequently is extremely sucessful in making money.
Point being the employees care, they take pride in what it is that they do, so a good product comes out the end.

I agree with you thou on the splotches thing to an extent.
Most workplaces encourage their employees to be forthcomming and innovative. For example you manufacturer cereal per say. There is a tolerance for how many burnt pieces or mixed pieces can be in a bushel. At any time an employee that extrudes this cereal everyday can say. You know it just doesnt look right to me, and the product goes through a series of more extensive testing. Now it wouldnt have had those tests if that specific employee didnt take pride it what he was producing enough to put his foot down. It met specs, but due to 20 years experience he/she knew something wasnt right.

Customers relate to this kind of stuff. If you opened a bag of cheerios and half were burnt, would you buy the brand again?

We're going to have to agree to disagree on this one.

I can appreciate your points about not being able to make employees care, but my opinion is this is still a cultural tone set top down, not bottom up. I've never seen it work or be driven the other way around - it nearly always falls back on management (I'm bowing out of the Union aspect of this discussion...).

Google and Apple aren't overly relevant in the context of what amounts to a discussion of blue collar manufacturing of commodity goods.

When you say "most workplaces encourage the workforce to be forthcoming...", this is again management encouraging this behavior.

We can agree that it takes both sides to be successful, and my opinion is when the culture of a facility is generally not geared to produce a quality product, the first place to start investigating is the philosophy of the management, and the culture of the plant.

My suspicion (and it's just my guess) is that at Alden culturally all the "flaws" we obsess over are simply not viewed the same way people here see them - and unless management drives a change, quality will likely continue down the same path.

And we Lemmings will continue to bemoan it, and gladly shell out $700+ to sell out an offering in 20 minutes... Hahahahah biggrin.gif

Cheers,
BN
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › ***The official Alden thread *** Share enthusiasm, reviews, sizing, advice, and photos.