or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › ***The official Alden thread *** Share enthusiasm, reviews, sizing, advice, and photos.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

***The official Alden thread *** Share enthusiasm, reviews, sizing, advice, and photos. - Page 7619  

post #114271 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by rydenfan View Post
 


agreed but if they were an 8.5 and not a 9 (could be either based on his other sizing) then @tifosi is going to be crying himself to sleep tonight 

LOL @rydenfan  I'm hoping since his whiskey PTB are 8.5 that I'm safe. 

post #114272 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by sazon View Post

I have me no whiskey. No I do not.
I have me some snuff.

And when it was yesterday I had me some earth reverse chamois.

Thank you Indy.

 

Sazon do you find that the earth reverse chamois breathes any better or worse than suede?

post #114273 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by applky View Post

Sazon do you find that the earth reverse chamois breathes any better or worse than suede?

I don’t find that one necessarily breathes better than the other.

I will say though that the reverse chamois is a thicker leather and has a very pronounced smell that hits you throughout the day (in a good way)…and it reminds you that you have some dope Indys on!
post #114274 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alden of Carmel View Post
 


The picture of Mike's boot right above is probably a good example.  Antique welt is basically the color of the welt Alden uses when they do an antique sole edge.  Two versions of the antique sole edge may be requested (that I am aware of).  1. Light antique (which we prefer for tan and light-colored shoes) and 2. Mid-tan antique (which we prefer for darker colored shoes such as color 8, brown CXL, etc.).  Yenni's color 8 unlined plain toe is a darker shoe so she has requested the darker, mid-tan antique sole edge.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdubs View Post


Think it will look very close to this but with a flat welt. Edges may be a little lighter. Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)


-Mike

 

 

Thank you for the clarification. Can’t wait to see these in person!

post #114275 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by sazon View Post

I don’t find that one necessarily breathes better than the other.

I will say though that the reverse chamois is a thicker leather and has a very pronounced smell that hits you throughout the day (in a good way)…and it reminds you that you have some dope Indys on!

you can smell your shoes? that's unreal.
post #114276 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akeem View Post

you can smell your shoes? that's unreal.

What good are Aldens if you can't experience all 5 senses with them?
post #114277 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by sazon View Post

What good are Aldens if you can't experience all 5 senses with them?

true. the smell of cordovan is worth 150 bucks.
post #114278 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akeem View Post


true. the smell of cordovan is worth 150 bucks.

 

true dat.....the smell when opening a new pair is better than seeing them IMO

post #114279 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post
 

I meant color 8 in shell.

 

I believe that Brick + Mortar is doing a run in the near future.....

post #114280 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by JezeC View Post
 

Anybody know where I can purchase a pair of Dovers with antique welt? Is this a stock item?

 

 

see post #114258

post #114281 of 122416

AOM Cigar SWB on Hampton

post #114282 of 122416
^^^ F**g Awesome , I 've never tried the Hampton last but looking at your Gap looks like the Hampton has a high instep!!
post #114283 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by Akeem View Post


true. the smell of cordovan is worth 150 bucks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ATLVol View Post
 

 

true dat.....the smell when opening a new pair is better than seeing them IMO

 

 

When I opened the box of my recent Alden JCrew boots the smell of the cordovan was really something!  It reminded me of my dad's shoe polishing room I think.
"What a smell!" I said, smiling. "Wow!"  
"Yeah, it smells just like a horse's ass," said my wife. 
Completely deadpan expression. Perfect delivery. 

 

Finally stopped raining last night--first wear outdoors!

 

In the shade:

 

In the morning sun:

 

The parking lot for my office is 1/4 mile from the door, then three flights of stairs.  Still trying to decide on topy/sole-saver vs just wearing the darn things until they need a resole and then sending them to Aram Hodikoglu of http://www.ahoneshoes.com, with whom I've been exchanging emails about a Dainite conversion.  I'm leaning that direction, since his prices are so reasonable, his patience and communication is top notch, and he's had such high recommendations here.  
(By the way, anyone who wants to do Dainite conversion right now: he told me that for the month of August he's doing a one-year anniversary deal of $100 plus the one-time shipping charge)

 

What's also leaning me in that direction is my local cobbler acts like he can't be bothered to discuss the details of putting sole-savers on my $700 shoes.  He'll do it alright, but just trust him and don't ask any questions.  Do you sand the sole so that the sole saver is flush?  What sole-saver options do I have, and how thick are they?  Finally, after some hemming and hawing, he showed me what they offer and it's the Vibram 2337, which is 2.2 mm thick.  I mentioned to him that I stood with the balls of my feet on a 2 mm thick stack of paper and could feel it plenty and felt like I was really back on my heels.  His response was that it won't feel like that and to basically stop worrying about it.  This guy is not a world class cobbler in a huge metropolis.  He's one guy in Fayetteville, AR, and I have no reason to trust him beyond what he can tell me (cause he can't show me pics or examples of his work, either).  Do I know more than he does?  Probably not, but I know enough to know what feels right on the bottom of my shoes.  Honestly, it's unusual in this area for such a "can't be bothered" attitude.  In NYC or DC I experienced it here and there, but one can afford that attitude with such a huge customer base potential and so many other options.  When I lived in those cities it didn't get me ruffled in the slightest--no one has any time, so let's decide and get going.  Fine.  But down here I think this guy has taken it for granted that people use him because he's practically the only choice.  I think he probably felt like I questioned his skills and dismissed me out of a defensive posture, but he may have cost himself a customer for any other projects--not just sole-savers.  Also, he had said something about putting leather lotion on shell cordovan and that the shell would get ruined in the rain.  The guy does not inspire confidence.

 

What's interesting is that I had come across a few instances in which Nick from BNelson has said if the sole-saver is thin enough it doesn't need to be recessed flush, as @mdubs agreed a while back (thanks for that advice!).  Here's what Nick said:
 

"Before you decide on sole guards, put on your new shoes, with one, step on a credit card (under the ball of your foot), the other on the bare floor. If you feel an uncomfortable significance in the balance, opt out on the sole guards."


A credit card is .76 mm thick.  If a person gets a 1 mm thick sole-saver--not 2.2mm, but 1 mm--then with sanding to score for adhesion knocks a bit off and I can see how this comes out about right.  However, the thing is that I also tried standing on a credit card and my feeling was the same! Back on my heels.


Edited by McQ7 - 8/6/15 at 7:57am
post #114284 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by McQ7 View Post

When I opened the box of my recent Alden JCrew boots the smell of the cordovan was really something!  It reminded me of my dad's shoe polishing room I think.

"What a smell!" I said, smiling. "Wow!"  

"Yeah, it smells just like a horse's ass," said my wife. 

Completely deadpan expression. Perfect delivery. 


Finally stopped raining last night--first wear outdoors!

In the shade:



In the morning sun:



The parking lot for my office is 1/4 mile from the door, then three flights of stairs.  Still trying to decide on topy/sole-saver vs just wearing the darn things until they need a resole and then sending them to Aram Hodikoglu of http://www.ahoneshoes.com, with whom I've been exchanging emails about a Dainite conversion.  I'm leaning that direction, since his prices are so reasonable, his patience and communication is top notch, and he's had such high recommendations here.  

(By the way, anyone who wants to do Dainite conversion right now: he told me that for the month of August he's doing a one-year anniversary deal of $100 plus the one-time shipping charge)

What's also leaning me in that direction is my local cobbler acts like he can't be bothered to discuss the details of putting sole-savers on my $700 shoes.  He'll do it alright, but just trust him and don't ask any questions.  Do you sand the sole so that the sole saver is flush?  What sole-saver options do I have, and how thick are they?  Finally, after some hemming and hawing, he showed me what they offer and it's the Vibram 2337, which is 2.2 mm thick.  I mentioned to him that I stood with the balls of my feet on a 2 mm thick stack of paper and could feel it plenty and felt like I was really back on my heels.  His response was that it won't feel like that and to basically stop worrying about it.  This guy is not a world class cobbler in a huge metropolis.  He's one guy in Fayetteville, AR, and I have no reason to trust him beyond what he can tell me (cause he can't show me pics or examples of his work, either).  Do I know more than he does?  Probably not, but I know enough to know what feels right on the bottom of my shoes.  Honestly, it's unusual in this area for such a "can't be bothered" attitude.  In NYC or DC I experienced it here and there, but one can afford that attitude with such a huge customer base potential and so many other options.  When I lived in those cities it didn't get me ruffled in the slightest--no one has any time, so let's decide and get going.  Fine.  But down here I think this guy has taken it for granted that people use him because he's practically the only choice.  I think he probably felt like I questioned his skills and dismissed me out of a defensive posture, but he may have cost himself a customer for any other projects--not just sole-savers.  Also, he had said something about putting leather lotion on shell cordovan and that the shell would get ruined in the rain.  The guy does not inspire confidence.

What's interesting is that I had come across a few instances in which Nick from BNelson has said if the sole-saver is thin enough it doesn't need to be recessed flush, as @mdubs
 agreed a while back (thanks for that advice!):

 
"Before you decide on sole guards, put on your new shoes, with one, step on a credit card (under the ball of your foot), the other on the bare floor. If you feel an uncomfortable significance in the balance, opt out on the sole guards."


A credit card is .76 mm thick.  If a person gets a 1 mm thick sole-saver--not 2.2mm, but 1 mm--then with sanding to score for adhesion knocks a bit off and I can see how this comes out about right.  However, the thing is that I also tried standing on a credit card and my feeling was the same! Back on my heels.
Very good info & thx for sharing
post #114285 of 122416
Quote:
Originally Posted by McQ7 View Post

When I opened the box of my recent Alden JCrew boots the smell of the cordovan was really something!  It reminded me of my dad's shoe polishing room I think.

"What a smell!" I said, smiling. "Wow!"  

"Yeah, it smells just like a horse's ass," said my wife. 

What's also leaning me in that direction is my local cobbler acts like he can't be bothered to discuss the details of putting sole-savers on my $700 shoes.  He'll do it alright, but just trust him and don't ask any questions.  Do you sand the sole so that the sole saver is flush?  What sole-saver options do I have, and how thick are they?  Finally, after some hemming and hawing, he showed me what they offer and it's the Vibram 2337, which is 2.2 mm thick.  I mentioned to him that I stood with the balls of my feet on a 2 mm thick stack of paper and could feel it plenty and felt like I was really back on my heels.  His response was that it won't feel like that and to basically stop worrying about it.  This guy is not a world class cobbler in a huge metropolis.  He's one guy in Fayetteville, AR, and I have no reason to trust him beyond what he can tell me (cause he can't show me pics or examples of his work, either).  Do I know more than he does?  Probably not, but I know enough to know what feels right on the bottom of my shoes.  Honestly, it's unusual in this area for such a "can't be bothered" attitude.  In NYC or DC I experienced it here and there, but one can afford that attitude with such a huge customer base potential and so many other options.  When I lived in those cities it didn't get me ruffled in the slightest--no one has any time, so let's decide and get going.  Fine.  But down here I think this guy has taken it for granted that people use him because he's practically the only choice.  I think he probably felt like I questioned his skills and dismissed me out of a defensive posture, but he may have cost himself a customer for any other projects--not just sole-savers.  Also, he had said something about putting leather lotion on shell cordovan and that the shell would get ruined in the rain.  The guy does not inspire confidence.

What's interesting is that I had come across a few instances in which Nick from BNelson has said if the sole-saver is thin enough it doesn't need to be recessed flush, as @mdubs
 agreed a while back (thanks for that advice!):

 
"Before you decide on sole guards, put on your new shoes, with one, step on a credit card (under the ball of your foot), the other on the bare floor. If you feel an uncomfortable significance in the balance, opt out on the sole guards."


A credit card is .76 mm thick.  If a person gets a 1 mm thick sole-saver--not 2.2mm, but 1 mm--then with sanding to score for adhesion knocks a bit off and I can see how this comes out about right.  However, the thing is that I also tried standing on a credit card and my feeling was the same! Back on my heels.

I would just get the vibram sole guards. I use them on all my boots with leather soles. You won't feel any difference in gait. And they have to sand it down a little to get the cement to work. It'll never be the same amount of sanding no matter who you use.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Streetwear and Denim
This thread is locked  
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Streetwear and Denim › ***The official Alden thread *** Share enthusiasm, reviews, sizing, advice, and photos.