or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Should Asians wear tweeds, browns, and bold patterns?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Should Asians wear tweeds, browns, and bold patterns? - Page 5

post #61 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by vitaminc View Post
Bold patterns: will look ludicrous on people with small frames, regardless of ethnicity.

I think it depends on the overall ensemble. Bold patterns will look over the top on anyone, if they're combined in an overly garish way.
post #62 of 152
What's the BFD about Asian guys wearing tweeds, browns and bold patterns?

I think the average Asian complexion actually looks very good with browns. Much better than the average pasty skinned Anglo.

As far as tweeds and bold patterns, it is a look that you either pull off or you don't because you know how to do it right and not make it look like an English costume. This is a silly discussion.
post #63 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by pocketsquareguy View Post
What's the BFD about Asian guys wearing tweeds, browns and bold patterns?

I think the average Asian complexion actually looks very good with browns. Much better than the average pasty skinned Anglo.

As far as tweeds and bold patterns, it is a look that you either pull off or you don't because you know how to do it right and not make it look like an English costume. This is a silly discussion.

Tweed = Scottish, so probably Scottish costume would be more appropriate.
post #64 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas View Post
Seminoles are Indians, right?

No, I mean an actual Asian people, noted victims of European aggression.

I have never understood why "Oriental" became non-PC all of a sudden. I had to reprimand my former dentist for using the term. I think he said some dental condition "was a common problem with orientals." His last name, amusingly enough, was Yasuda! I always thought it was a useful term. Certainly, if anyone wants to call me an "occidental," it's fine with me. It's what I am.

I would hardly put "negro" and "porch monkey" in the same category. The one was the honorable and preferred term for people of African ancestry for the first three decades of my life, at which time it was quite abruptly supplanted by "black." "Porch monkey" needs no comment!
post #65 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post
Tweed = Scottish, so probably Scottish costume would be more appropriate.

Sir, I stand corrected.
post #66 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
What about all the Italians and Indiana Jones?

ok, I'll cry 'uncle' and concede to a point.

The FULL - tweed, brown,.. - look is best on WHITE guys mostly. Italian, Swede, Brit whatever.

I think if an Asian wears a tweed jacket that looks like it came out of the pages of Country Life; he should NOT add to its aspect of regional kit by accessorizing it with obviously English or Italian shoes, hats, tweedy ties. If I owned a jacket like one of yours I would treat it as streetwear; with jeans.

Maf, this is not a dig at you; I just don't like the overall look of tweed and brown. It's too regional and uniformish - like those roomy outfits people from Pakistan wear; with the beard, and the headgear... I think I had better stop typing.
post #67 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post
Tweed = Scottish, so probably Scottish costume would be more appropriate.

Hmmm, I happen to be wearing a Donegal tweed at the moment. Last time I looked, Donegal wasn't in Scotland.
post #68 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
That's a very old expression; used as a perjorative occasionally down through history.
Oriental and to an extent, negro, are politically incorrect these days. I don't feel they have any strong loaded connotations as say, "nigger" or "Chinaman". Those two terms are unfashionable due to a now apparently heightened social consciousness.
post #69 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
Hmmm, I happen to be wearing a Donegal tweed at the moment. Last time I looked, Donegal wasn't in Scotland.

No, no you're right. I was just being pedantic. I just think it's amusing that the English have appropriated all these bits and pieces from Scotland, Ireland, Wales, the former colonies, etc., which have since become in the international mind the very essence of Englishness. Britishness I could stomach, but Englishness???
post #70 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
ok, I'll cry 'uncle' and concede to a point.

The FULL - tweed, brown,.. - look is best on WHITE guys mostly. Italian, Swede, Brit whatever.

I think if an Asian wears a tweed jacket that looks like it came out of the pages of Country Life; he should NOT add to its aspect of regional kit by accessorizing it with obviously English or Italian shoes, hats, tweedy ties. If I owned a jacket like one of yours I would treat it as streetwear; with jeans.

Maf, this is not a dig at you; I just don't like the overall look of tweed and brown. It's too regional and uniformish - like those roomy outfits people from Pakistan wear; with the beard, and the headgear... I think I had better stop typing.

I can't express how much I disagree with you. Do you happen to be American?
post #71 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by academe View Post
I don't agree with this at all. Your vision of culture and ethnicity really doesn't take into account the multiculturality of many industrialised countries, and how style can be adopted by anyone, so long as it complements their complexion, build, etc. Perhaps I'm over-interpreting this, but by this rationale you might as well say that ALL non-Europeans shouldn't wear suits, since after all, the suit is a Western European creation.

On a personal level, I'm of Chinese descent, born in the UK and wear tweed, windowpane fabrics, prince of wales... Where would that put me? Costumey? Rdiculous? I' don't think so. Worsted fabrics don't look any less costumey than tweed - it just depends on your frame of reference.

Yes, I'm of Chinese descent too. Canadian born. No intent from me to denigrate anyones style adoption.

When style goes too far - those Japanese gents on Sartorialist - the sum of the tweed plus the suede shoes, the moleskin pants; just can - in some instances - seem affected.

All I'm saying is; style should be unaffected, natural.

I do realize that some of you may find it appropriate now to raise the subject of my bond cuff shirts
post #72 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
When style goes too far - those Japanese gents on Sartorialist - the sum of the tweed plus the suede shoes, the moleskin pants; just can - in some instances - seem affected.


Nearly every man and every woman shown on the Sartorialist is affected.


- B
post #73 of 152
Academe: I think the only way you would be able to convince me that tweed is not old manish is to point to a group of youth in China or HK that wear tweed and have not been influenced by the British (ie: living in Scotland).

Vox: I have not seen anyone in China or HK with what I could recognize as a Saville Row suit. I have been to the Row and seen their bespoke clothing.

I can tell you that if I did see someone wearing such a suit anywhere outside of the row, I would not recognize it. This may be heresy but I cannot differentiate between a Saville Row suit and a well fitting OTR or MTM suit. I am not in the "know". The only thing I noticed was SR suits use very interesting fabrics.

RE: Fit; SR is not the only way to get a well fitting garment. There are elements to fit here than would go unnoticed in the real world. There are also elements of fit here that would be noticed in the real world but are praised here.


How old were you guys again? j/k but, seriously, leaving the internet-ego argument behind, sometimes you guys seem so disconnected from reality. Tweed in among Asians in Asia? It gets pretty hot there. That might be a reason it would be considered costumey or old. In HK, the only ones who are in the "know" about tweed are those old enough to have been influenced by the British. The costumes are the ones wearing tweed in 30-40 degrees celcius.

Mustapha: Agreed - Tweed is a British thing and does look off. Those who can "get away with it" could probably get away with a lot of things.
post #74 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by JLibourel View Post
No, I mean an actual Asian people, noted victims of European aggression.

Duh. I thought Indians and Indians were the same thing.

Seriously though, I am stumped. I thought maybe it was a trick question and animals could be included, e.g. Bengal Tigers. But there are no Mongols or Ghurkas at any D-1 colleges I can name, though both would make fearsome mascots.

Owls are wise and so are old Chinese men, but I don't think that's what Temple had in mind.

Texas Tech's Raiders are Red and not Yellow.

I'm joking again, but resisting google.
post #75 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mustapha View Post
Yes, I'm of Chinese descent too. Canadian born. No intent from me to denigrate anyones style adoption.

When style goes too far - those Japanese gents on Sartorialist - the sum of the tweed plus the suede shoes, the moleskin pants; just can - in some instances - seem affected.

All I'm saying is; style should be unaffected, natural.

I do realize that some of you may find it appropriate now to raise the subject of my bond cuff shirts

Thing is, this all depends on your frame of reference, and your experiences and surroundings. Living in Scotland, you tend to see plenty of people of all ages, shapes and sizes wearing tweed, patterned coats, suede shoes, moleskin, etc. It's really common place, and so what might seem "affected" and "costumey" to a north American wouldn't seem particularly out of place here... I just find the sweeping statements irritating, and the very limited cultural perspectives being brought to bear a bit trying.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Should Asians wear tweeds, browns, and bold patterns?