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Bush wears a rented tux to Buckingham Palace - Page 2

post #16 of 31
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I really liked that article. Best line ever: "Bush. Texas. Tuxedo." I'm all for the evolution of style. Who knows, maybe in a hundred years we'll see butlers wearing two-piece suits and sportjackets + odd trousers becoming the new rule.
You'll never see my butler in such garb.
post #17 of 31
Nicholas Antongiavanni is a pen name, right?
post #18 of 31
Manton, Great article, but could you go into more detail about why trousers replaced breeches. The article seemed to suggest that many of the innovations Brummel introduced enabled him to be able to afford to keep up with the aristocracy, but I don't see how the shift to breeches fits this. But, I have to disagree with you on the idea that clothes can make you an Adonis. They might make you look better, but there are still limits.
post #19 of 31
I have seen Bush in white tie, and he looks rather ridiculous. However patent leather is not the abolsute last word for formal wear. Perhaps most men are afraid of wearing low vamp pumps with bows, and silk hose.
post #20 of 31
Who is Horace? He was mentioned in the article. ls it our very own Horace from Ask Andy and Style forum?
post #21 of 31
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Who is Horace? He was mentioned in the article. ls it our very own Horace from Ask Andy and Style forum?
I suspect this one. He's dead.
post #22 of 31
Horace: a Roman philosopher
post #23 of 31
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Do you think Bush was attempting to start (or follow) a new fashion trend?
No. I think he just hates to dress up.
post #24 of 31
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Who is Horace? He was mentioned in the article. ls it our very own Horace from Ask Andy and Style forum?
Yeah, I think Manton was citing me again. He gave me credit, so I cannot complain.
post #25 of 31
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No. I think he just hates to dress up.
I think not. Might it not be that Texas rules eschew Savile Row in favor of Rodeo Drive and bows in favor of bolos? Perhaps, in the rules of local custom, chaps win out over spats and ten gallons top hats? Would not a base of Crawford rather than Oxford Spur one to consider the style mandates of a different world? IMHO, the Point Collar of Preferred Pique is handily trumped by the Shining Silver of a Collar's Traditional Tips. Answers in advance ... because some of we workaday folk have to actually leave the computer to earn our pittances: Manton: I know:The Rules are universal and location is unimportant. Perhaps the tenet of the cited article, that the world's most powerful person has the juice to bend 'em a bit, extends all the way to tumbleweed town? In any event, arguing style with a man and his gun rack is usually a losing proposition. Carlo: Don't you go stickin' in none of your Jersey transplant "can't believe what they wear down here" stuff. JCusey: Whether Lobbs or Leddys, new leather still smells better than weed fuzz. RJMan: Allow the postulating prosaicist a bit of latitude with your espousal of elegant English? Y'all Giddyiap, Now.
post #26 of 31
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Great article, but could you go into more detail about why trousers replaced breeches. The article seemed to suggest that many of the innovations Brummel introduced enabled him to be able to afford to keep up with the aristocracy, but I don't see how the shift to breeches fits this.
Simple: breeches are for riding, which indicates that the wearer owns a country estate and has sufficient income to keep a stable.  Brummell's father was a successful shopkeeper, and left the Beau a few thousand pounds.  This was enough to allow Brummell a nice life in London, until he gambled it away.  But it was not enough -- not nearly enough -- to maintain the kind of country house life of the aristocracy.  So Brummell changed the rules.  He "citified" his look.  The point was to eliminate the horsy status symbols that the upper class wore in town, and make everyone look largely the same.
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But, I have to disagree with you on the idea that clothes can make you an Adonis. They might make you look better, but there are still limits.
Well, you have to allow a writer a little poetic license.
post #27 of 31
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Quote But, I have to disagree with you on the idea that clothes can make you an Adonis. They might make you look better, but there are still limits. Well, you have to allow a writer a little poetic license.
Yeah. It's all you poets that cause 15 guys per year to walk into my studio expecting to walk out looking like Cary Grant. Damn poetic license.
post #28 of 31
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Sadly, as RJMan points out, we live in a time when ceremony is not valued. That's one reason why I appreciated the state ceremony surrounding Ronald Reagan's passing. They were ceremonial muscles that needed to be exercised lest they be lost.
I was present at his funeral procession and was shocked at the public's complete ignorance -- to the point of offensiveness -- of basic respect for the dead. While some on this board may have guessed I did not share the late Gipper's politics I can at least respect the event. The American Jackass throngs in baseball caps -- which they never took off as the cortege passed -- who applauded the casket as if they were glad he was dead -- may have felt grief but they sure as hell could have fooled me by their behavior. The tailcoat issue may be another message from certain parties that protocol is for the indolent or the pedantic. However, I submit that a state memorial ceremony for a former leader deserves a certain maintenance of basic formulas of protocol.
post #29 of 31
Excellent article, Manton. Much as I hate to imagine their thought processes, I think even the non-clothes obsessed would find it a fascinating treatment.
post #30 of 31
Uriahheep: "Horace: a Roman philosopher"[sic]. He was a POET, DAMMIT, A POET.... Time was when every educated gentleman could be expected to be intimately familiar with Horace (in the original, of course) and quote him appropriately. In many respects, that was a beter time.
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