or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Espresso Maker
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Espresso Maker - Page 13

post #181 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
No they have brick and mortar stores too and sell the capsules through other stores (Bloomingdales Soho comes to mind in my hood). That said, the easiest for me is online ordering - rarely takes more than a day.

and they are supposed to open the nespresso store in Spring 2010
post #182 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSC4President View Post
for the under $500 price point, i had assumed that the nespresso was my only option. Is there a "real" device for that price point?

no, there are plenty of manual options for under $500. Browse around Amazon. Also figure $50 for a good grinder.
post #183 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
No they have brick and mortar stores too and sell the capsules through other stores (Bloomingdales Soho comes to mind in my hood). That said, the easiest for me is online ordering - rarely takes more than a day.

thanks for the information and all of the posts. I'm probably ordering one for my father for Christmas.
post #184 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSC4President View Post
for the under $500 price point, i had assumed that the nespresso was my only option. Is there a "real" device for that price point? I would like to grind, clean, select different blends, etc.. So i would like to purchase something where i could learn (by trial and error) how to make a proper espresso. The nespresso is appealing, but i am fearful that i would get bored with having a relatively limited selection of capsules to chose from.

Are you focused on pods or 'regular' espresso. If the latter, then there should be many options for you, especially if you buy used. I got an Elektra Microcasa (that I believe had one shot run through it) for well under $500. If you don't go the pod route, you'll need a quality grinder (probably more important than the espresso maker). Both for under $500 isn't impossible. Sometimes deals show up on home barista and coffee geek. I got both my Elektra and a Pasquini grinder off of craigslist (about $400 total).
post #185 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by arced View Post
Are you focused on pods or 'regular' espresso. If the latter, then there should be many options for you, especially if you buy used. I got an Elektra Microcasa (that I believe had one shot run through it) for well under $500. If you don't go the pod route, you'll need a quality grinder (probably more important than the espresso maker). Both for under $500 isn't impossible. Sometimes deals show up on home barista and coffee geek. I got both my Elektra and a Pasquini grinder off of craigslist (about $400 total).

ok thanks. I will take a look on amazon. and i will also take a look at the coffee geek website.

i havent decided between the pods or regular espresso. i just want something that taste good with a proper crema. doing my research
post #186 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSC4President View Post
ok thanks. I will take a look on amazon. and i will also take a look at the coffee geek website.

i havent decided between the pods or regular espresso. i just want something that taste good with a proper crema. doing my research

sometimes you can do both. My machine does the full manual and ESE pods.
post #187 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by gomestar View Post
some of us enjoy coffee as a beverage and not as a hobby or a science. to sum up the points made, yes, limited selection is a trade off. but there are advantages: consistency from shot to shot (I'd rather pull shot after shot of great ESE espresso than have 10% superb shots, 40% great, 40% good, and 10% terrible ... I am no expert after all), generally very good quality, ease of use (I can't seem to avoid a mess with my tamper), etc.
A super automatic machine provides all of the advantages listed above, plus it allows you to use any beans you want. Only downside is the initial purchase cost, but if you drink a lot of coffee I think it is cheaper than buying those overpriced capsules which contain mediocre quality beans.
post #188 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by JSC4President View Post
i havent decided between the pods or regular espresso. i just want something that taste good with a proper crema. doing my research

I think the huge advantage of going the route of brewing 'regular' espresso is that you get to sample the wares of a lot of interesting coffee roasters. With pods, you're stuck with the really big corporations that have the ability to put out their stuff in pods. I don't have experience with pods, so I'm don't know anything about their quality, but it seems like it's quite a limitation.
post #189 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by arced View Post
With pods, you're stuck with the really big corporations that have the ability to put out their stuff in pods. I don't have experience with pods, so I'm don't know anything about their quality, but it seems like it's quite a limitation.

That isn't completely true if you're talking about standardized pods like ESE. There are many smaller producers because the investment required to produce pods is minimal. Check this sampler for example http://www.podmerchant.com/espresso-pods/SAMP001.html

I personally really don't care because I tend to revert to two or three blends I really like and don't need much variety in my coffee, but ESE is less limiting than the proprietary one-brand pod systems.
post #190 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
That isn't completely true if you're talking about standardized pods like ESE. There are many smaller producers because the investment required to produce pods is minimal. Check this sampler for example http://www.podmerchant.com/espresso-pods/SAMP001.html

I personally really don't care because I tend to revert to two or three blends I really like and don't need much variety in my coffee, but ESE is less limiting than the proprietary one-brand pod systems.

I didn't know the extent of pod makers. Are pods more popular in Europe? The list seemed to have more European producers. I guess my point is that I tend to buy from smaller coffee roasters in the US (counter culture coffee, intelligentsia, etc.) and I'd be sad if I couldn't access their espresso.
post #191 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by arced View Post
I didn't know the extent of pod makers. Are pods more popular in Europe? The list seemed to have more European producers. I guess my point is that I tend to buy from smaller coffee roasters in the US (counter culture coffee, intelligentsia, etc.) and I'd be sad if I couldn't access their espresso.

This discussion is definitely out of my league now so I will bow out
post #192 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by BB1 View Post
A super automatic machine provides all of the advantages listed above, plus it allows you to use any beans you want. Only downside is the initial purchase cost, but if you drink a lot of coffee I think it is cheaper than buying those overpriced capsules which contain mediocre quality beans.

I have never heard of buying a super automatic machine for cost savings. How much coffee would you have to drink for a mid-level super automatic machine (say the $1,300 DeLonghi, far cheaper than the $4,000 high-end machines) to pay itself off?? I mean we're looking at well over 2,100 individual Nespresso shots ($1300 - $250 for Nespresso machine / 0.49 cost per Nespresso pod). The number goes higher when you figure in the cost coffee beans. You'll break even at 6 shots a day, every day, for one year. If you drink it every other day, we're looking at well over a decade to break even.

And this is assuming the capsules contain mediocre coffee, which I (and others) have found is not the case.
post #193 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by gdl203 View Post
I've used Nespresso for at least 12 or 13 years now and I chuckle (internally) when I visit friends with more "prestigious" equipment, who grind their own coffee and serve me a result that is significantly inferior to the N espresso.

IMO, there's nothing wrong with the Nespresso equipment or system itself either - great, durable machines, great quality beans. If that makes you feel better, Corton, a 2 Michelin star restaurant, serves only Nespresso at the end of meals.

This is not the equivalent of the non-iron shirt at all. It's a perfect example of OTT snubbism that's disconnected from the reality of the product's quality.

In re-reading my comment, I recognize it may have been unduly harsh and "snubbish" (or "snobbish"), but the premise behind it is simple: as a home roaster, I fundamentally cannot understand embracing pre-ground, less than fresh coffee -- or the suggestion that it can produce a result "significantly superior" to a properly tamped and pulled shot made with fresh, correctly ground coffee.

Pulling a great shot is a pain in the ass to learn, and the equipment required to get one is not inexpensive -- so yes, there are time and cost impediments here; but once you get past these two barriers (one small the other larger), it is simple to pull consistently outstanding shots.

I am not suggesting that pods produce "bad" coffee, but without question they cannot produce anything akin to a transcendent shot.

That said, most people don't care enough about coffee to obsess over the difference between these distinctions; similarly, there are things I really care little about that others ponder day and night. To each his own.

As to the use of pods in other venues, they are not uncommon -- precisely because making espresso is time consuming and messy. Thomas Keller uses Illy pods in his espresso machines at the Bouchon bakery, and it would not surprise me if he used them in other restaurants. What they care about is that they serve good coffee, not that they serve coffee for which you'd stand in line.
post #194 of 228
What do you snobs think of La Colombe's Nizza espresso beans? I switched over from Illy and like them very much.
post #195 of 228
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJman View Post
What do you snobs think of La Colombe's Nizza espresso beans? I switched over from Illy and like them very much.
I'm too much of a snob even to buy espresso! I roast my own! I haven't tried La Colombe's but I'd trust the source -- moving away from a more mass produced coffee is a plus, as is getting something from a roaster that's going to send you something freshly roasted. I also like Blue Bottle's 17 Foot Ceiling as an espresso blend, but my favorite (which you can purchase from any number of sources, including directly from the creator of the blend -- Dr. Joseph John of Josuma Coffee Co.), is Malabar Gold.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Social Life, Food & Drink, Travel › Espresso Maker