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The French Are Not Like You & Me (Long) - Page 2

post #16 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edward Appleby
Why is there so much random necroposting?
It used to be a sign that a certain banned Frenchman was back under a new identity.
post #17 of 44
[quote=jerrysfriend]
Quote:
For 8 days in Paris, I took:
(a) a Chester Barrie double breasted gray suit,
(b) a Fallon & Harvey bespoke charcoal chalk stripe suit,
© a Norman Hilton dark grey flannel suit,
(d) a Chester Barrie navy double breasted blazer (left it behind; Ernest is taking care of it for me)
(e) a Kiton cashmere plaid sport coat,
(f) 3 pairs of trousers,
(g) 10 dress shirts,
(h) 16 ties,
(1) 4 pairs of dress shoes (Cleverly,EG, Grenson and Alden),
(j) Burberry heavyweight lined trenchcoat,
(k) two cashmere sweater shirts
(l) one red vest (had not worn for years; tosssed it when saw moth holes)
(l) one cashmere/silk scarf, two pairs of gloves, underwear, socks, handkerchiefs, belts, braces, etc.
I only bought 2 pairs of shoes there. This is well-dressed?
KenCPollock/jerrysfriend

You certainly weren't letting Paris down with that wardrobe. And I suppose that the bellman in your hotel quite appreciated the tips.

Since spending a year or so on the Fora, I now am relegated to a 2 cart w/bellhop check-in or out at any hotel where I will be for more than 3 days. I do manage to look at my wife when we are checking in hoping that they will think all those clothes and shoes are hers.

Perry
post #18 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by LabelKing
The Italians also place much emphasis on a certain personal presentation.

La Bella Figura: to present oneself in appearance and manners/demeanour to an expected/acceptable level.

I've been amazed, when hospital visiting, for example, to see the lengths other (Italian) visitors, men and women, go to. In the past I haven't dressed with as much thought and attention to detail to some weddings.

Buying Saturday's morning papers I still feel under-dressed no matter how hard I try.
post #19 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britalian
La Bella Figura: to present oneself in appearance and manners/demeanour to an expected/acceptable level.

I've been amazed, when hospital visiting, for example, to see the lengths other (Italian) visitors, men and women, go to. In the past I haven't dressed with as much thought and attention to detail to some weddings.

Buying Saturday's morning papers I still feel under-dressed no matter how hard I try.

Since joining SF I've stopped going out the door looking like a slob, even if I'm just doing a quick errand. I ran out last weekend to get motor oil at a grocery store - sweaty from mowing the lawn - and felt like everyone was staring (they weren't).
I'm not quite to la bella figura (beautiful face?) but I do feel better walking out the door.
post #20 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Britalian
La Bella Figura: to present oneself in appearance and manners/demeanour to an expected/acceptable level. I've been amazed, when hospital visiting, for example, to see the lengths other (Italian) visitors, men and women, go to. In the past I haven't dressed with as much thought and attention to detail to some weddings. Buying Saturday's morning papers I still feel under-dressed no matter how hard I try.
This also includes various accessories including the cigarette, and sunglasses. Both of those items seem requisite for the Italians' conception of being chic.
post #21 of 44
We are proud of you, forumites, the few americans that are still stylish !
post #22 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by lakewolf
We are proud of you, forumites, the few americans that are still stylish !
Uh, thanks.
post #23 of 44
That's what we call damning with faint praise.
post #24 of 44
16 ties for 8 days in Paris?

[quote=jerrysfriend]
Quote:
For 8 days in Paris, I took:
(a) a Chester Barrie double breasted gray suit,
(b) a Fallon & Harvey bespoke charcoal chalk stripe suit,
© a Norman Hilton dark grey flannel suit,
(d) a Chester Barrie navy double breasted blazer (left it behind; Ernest is taking care of it for me)
(e) a Kiton cashmere plaid sport coat,
(f) 3 pairs of trousers,
(g) 10 dress shirts,
(h) 16 ties,
(1) 4 pairs of dress shoes (Cleverly,EG, Grenson and Alden),
(j) Burberry heavyweight lined trenchcoat,
(k) two cashmere sweater shirts
(l) one red vest (had not worn for years; tosssed it when saw moth holes)
(l) one cashmere/silk scarf, two pairs of gloves, underwear, socks, handkerchiefs, belts, braces, etc.
I only bought 2 pairs of shoes there. This is well-dressed?
KenCPollock/jerrysfriend
post #25 of 44
< cough, cough
LL
post #26 of 44
[quote=seok]16 ties for 8 days in Paris?


I wore one outfit in the morning hours, to lunch and the afternoon. Went back to the room around 6, showered and dressed for dinner in a different outfit. I like to "rest" ties for a week or so after wearing, so I thught I would need 16 of them for 8 days.
However, I had about 2 ties too many, because twice I dresssed casually in a cashmere sweater shirt under a sport jacket and wore no tie. I probably let the French down on those 2 days. E****t (banned) will not me forget it.
post #27 of 44
God save the spirit of the French and Italians, whom I find to be far more stylish than the French. In my three trips to Paris, I have never been impressed that they care all that much for how they look. Granted, there are a lot of shops filled with well turned-out attendants but, in the main, I have not noticed the shifting throngs to be particularly well dressed.

Quite the opposite in Rome and Florence, especially Florence. Those folks have elegance -- like music, craftsmanship and high concept design -- in the blood.

Even the Argentines display a greater sense of elegance than the French. Not that I have anything against the French, mind you; they've just managed to underwhelm me each time I've visited (maybe because I've always been led to expect them to be the height of panache, and they aren't).
post #28 of 44
The French are not like you and me: they make things like this.
post #29 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by LARon
God save the spirit of the French and Italians, whom I find to be far more stylish than the French. In my three trips to Paris, I have never been impressed that they care all that much for how they look. Granted, there are a lot of shops filled with well turned-out attendants but, in the main, I have not noticed the shifting throngs to be particularly well dressed.

Quite the opposite in Rome and Florence, especially Florence. Those folks have elegance -- like music, craftsmanship and high concept design -- in the blood.

Even the Argentines display a greater sense of elegance than the French. Not that I have anything against the French, mind you; they've just managed to underwhelm me each time I've visited (maybe because I've always been led to expect them to be the height of panache, and they aren't).

Agreed !
post #30 of 44
Some hard-to-dispute differences in appearance attitudes between the French and Americans are about teeth and cosmetic surgery. Americans are much more fond of those things. Also, Americans who highly value their looks are more likely to exercise religiously. In other words, the French indeed look more "natural." One could make the argument that bodily attractiveness reduces the need for sophisticated casual dressing, but no image consultant would endorse that. Anyway, while how much better is hard to quantify, the French do dress better.
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