or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Mont Blanc or oftenther upper end writing utensils
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mont Blanc or oftenther upper end writing utensils - Page 2

post #16 of 32
I have a Mont Blanc fountain pen. However, I find my Omas MOMA much more satisfactory to write with. As omeone else has said, the Mont Blanc has cachet, but it is sometimes used as the pen equivalent of the obvious Rolex - bought for show because everyone knows it's expensive. My Omas is fairly plain, with a Deco styling that appeals to me, and writes beautifully. The range may be worth considering. Omas
post #17 of 32
A girlfriend once bought me a Pelikan fountain pen made of wood.  It is engraved with my name on it in gold, and the wood is supposed to take on a patina as the oils in my hand rub off on it. I used it daily for a few weeks, but soon realized that the ink smeared when it got wet.  Sweat in the summer, rain in the fall, occasional tears when the boss "ripped me a new one"....  I simply came to the conclusion that the risk of not being able to read my handwritten notes sometime in the future made a fountain pen an unacceptable writing instrument. I now use a Récife marble resin ball point pen. Even if I spill a cup of water on a document or get caught in a downpour, once the liquid dries, my notes aren't lost. Bic
post #18 of 32
I have a few fountain pens, including the same Aurora as linked above. It's a great pen, but it lays down too thick a line for me so it gets less use.  A couple points: If at all possible, visit an actual store for your purchase. Even if you know which pen you want to purchase, the nib widths are inexact (what is Fine?) and every pen feels different. A while ago I was dead set on buying an Omas, but I couldn't stand the thing when I tried it at Fountain Pen Hospital. It was far too light, making it uncomfortable to use even for a few seconds. A beautiful pen, sure, but it was not for me. Avoid used pens if possible. The nib will shape to the users writing style (assuming it is gold, which it should be.) and using someone else pen can be slightly uncomfortable. A fountain pen is emphatically not like a suit. Even if you don't like suits, decorum dictates you need to have one. If you don't like a fountain pen, nothing says you need to use one. You may grow tired of your pen. They are finnicky at times and are different. I would recommend buying near the bottom of the high end, at least to start. Spending much more than $100 on your first pen is, if not exactly foolish, not exactly wise. I think the cheapest you can expect to pay for a good pen is between $50 and $100. Of course, you can get a decent every day pen for much less. The Lamy Safari pens are not bad, and are only $20. Prices vary between stores, so do your research. Under $100, these are excellent: Namiki Vanishing Point A unique pen, available in a number of finishes/colors. Waterman Expert A nice, substantial pen. A workhorse. Not the fanciest, but it holds up phenomenally well. Discontinued colors are often on sale.. If you want to spend a bit more, I'd look into Conklin pens. They are made by pen aficionados who resuscitated an old American manufacturer. I have a Nozac in red and it's a beautiful pen. It's very flashy, but who cares. The blue is a safer choice. These cost about $130 at Joon. And yes, I would recommend avoiding Montblanc altogether. They are nice enough pens, but they are incredibly bland, boring even. Who wants that?
post #19 of 32
I have three up market fountain pens. I have a MontBlanc Dostoevsky and Proust FP, because I adore both writers and they are limited editions. They are not as ubiquitous as those Black MB you see everywhere. I also have a gorgeous Versace pen by Omas that is simply stunning. And guess what, the nib on the Versace/Omas is far smoother and clearer than the higher end 18k MB nibs. Pity the Versace pens these days are crap (no longer Omas made).
post #20 of 32
What do people think of Caran d'Ache for pens? I used to own a Waterman Laureat, which was a nice little pen, and then a Waterman Carene -- after losing the Carene as well I've given up on spending a lot of money for a pen but I still like owning a fountain pen, and I think I've graduated beyond the starter models. I am curious as to what the opinion is on Watermans (Watermen?) here. One concern of mine is buying ink -- Waterman and Montblanc inks are sold everywhere, whereas with other mfrs, not so much. My impression is that we're supposed to use the ink of the same mfr as the pen -- am I wrong?
post #21 of 32
Fountain pen ink is a little like shoe polish. A manufacturer will tell you that you're better off using their brand, but the truth is only they are better off with you using their brand. Use a quality ink, clean the pen regularly, and you'll be fine. If you find that the feed is clogging, ask a high-end pen shop for a thinner ink. They know their stuff. I have no experience with Caran d'Ache pens, but they sure aren't cheap. Waterman pens are good. They're not exactly gorgeous--though the Carenne in orange was pretty cool--but they get the job done.
post #22 of 32
Omas is the shiznit. I have a 360 FP and a limited edition Jerusalem FP (I have been meaning to purchase a Paragon); Montegrappa is also very nice. Yes Montblanc is not the best pen money can buy (for the price) but, the one advantage is that you can get refills anywhere in the world, thus it is normally my primary pen when I travel...even though my other pens are by far finer writing instruments. Regarding leakage, if you fly a lot, just get a FP that has a convertible mechanism, thus you can load cartages instead of ink and you will avoid messy spills. The only Montblanc's that are worth really having if money is an issue is one of the limited editions, at least they are made to greater standards than their regular production items. Be forewarned though, using a limited edition FP will decrease its value (well, except if you have an original Parker Snake). The only Caran d'Ache I own is a very limited sterling silver production pen that was made exclusively for Patek Philippe for their use way back when. Truth be told, I have never used it, thus I cannot attribute to its writing quality, looks well made though. Jon.
post #23 of 32
I recieved as a gift a montblanc. for me it serves it purpose. I carry a tiny spacepen in my pants pocket, as well, for any real writting that I have to do - the fauntain pen is mostly for signing things. When I fly, I put the FP in my briefcase, but I have never had any leakage.
post #24 of 32
I use a Caran d'Ache as my main, everyday fountain pen. It writes beautifully and I like its heft and balance. They're not cheap, but I find them a much better value than Mont Blanc -- they are very well made. I have a big Parker Duofold that is a wonderful pen and is great for signing important documents, but is a little too imposing to use every day.
post #25 of 32
I have a Mont Blanc Meisterstuck 144 that's twenty + years old. It has a 18c nib and is a great fountain pen. Of course it's well worn in but it's large, comfortable, never leaks and is a design classic (although common nowadays). I also use a Parker 75 (sterling silver) which is also very good. Bought it on Ebay. Another nice pen is the Aurora Hastil. It's a bit hard to find but it's one of the few pens in the permanent collection at MOMA. It's very minimal and elegant. Has a white gold nib. Aurora
post #26 of 32
If you like the blue or red, you can pick up an Aurora Talentum from Joon.com for $160. I like the Optima better, but its $100+ more.
post #27 of 32
Quote:
What do people think of Caran d'Ache for pens?
I have (and love) a Caran d'Ache fountain pen that I've been using for a few years... black lacquer with a rhodium nib and ends. It's a lovely pen, writes wonderfully, doesn't leak, and has excellent heft. I purchased it from the multiply-mentioned Fountain Pen Hospital -- a wonderful shop with great service. As for inks, I've run a number of different inks through my Caran to test them out, and have found that Waterman and Omas inks work the best for me. I'm particularly fond of the Omas tobacco brown, which while not terribly traditional does write exceptionally well. -s
post #28 of 32
I agree with the above - Waterman inks are good. My favorite blue is Waterman blue-black, and my favorite black is Aurora. I don't like Omas black, but I may have to order that tobacco brown and give it a try.
post #29 of 32
Quote:
I have a Mont Blanc fountain pen.  However, I find my Omas MOMA much more satisfactory to write with. As omeone else has said, the Mont Blanc has cachet, but it is sometimes used as the pen equivalent of the obvious Rolex - bought for show because everyone knows it's expensive. My Omas is fairly plain, with a Deco styling that appeals to me, and writes beautifully.  The range may be worth considering. Omas
The Omas blue ink -- I think there is one in particular that was a special vintage, as it were, is incredible. Never saw a blue quite like it. What was the old social rule? Black ink for business and government papers. (I think some forms used to state that signatures in blue ink were unacceptable). Blue ink for social papers? And I never did quite figure out what blue-black ink was. And why the rules were so. Ooops, I just realized that I mentioned rules. Be easy on me.
post #30 of 32
Quote:
The Omas blue ink -- I think there is one in particular that was a special vintage, as it were, is incredible.  Never saw a blue quite like it. What was the old social rule? Black ink for business and government papers.  (I think some forms used to state that signatures in blue ink were unacceptable). Blue ink for social papers? And I never did quite figure out what blue-black ink was. And why the rules were so. Ooops, I just realized that I mentioned rules.  Be easy on me.
In my business, we are required to sign things in blue ink, because it is easier to distinguish a copy from an original. My favorite blue is Aurora blue. Parker's penman saphire is great too, but quite hard to find these days. I use fountain pens every day. My workhorse is an extra fine point nib Schaeffer snorkel that I bought off of Ebay several years ago for about $40. It's a terrific pen, and the extra fine point is good at filling out forms, scribbling in margins, and other tasks where a thicker nib wouldn't work so well. For signatures, I prefer an italic nib, and often use a Parker or Aurora with italic nibs. For all around writing, a medium point nib is best, and the rest of my pens are mostly medium points.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Classic Menswear
Styleforum › Forums › Men's Style › Classic Menswear › Mont Blanc or oftenther upper end writing utensils