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Can someone please explain khakis? - Page 2

post #16 of 132
Quote:
They became popular when the GIs came back from WWII.  Never fell out of style since.
Yes, this in large measure accounts for their popularity as I understand it. They were standard issue for men in the Pacific theater, and those stationed on the West Coast. Also, wool was strictly rationed during the war, so more men's clothes were made from cotton, which was much more readily available.
post #17 of 132
Quote:
I really hate khakis, with a passion, but I'm curious as to why they are so popular.  I think they look super tacky and cheap, regardless of brand, and make the wearer look like an accountant who lives in Smallville and drives a Dodge Caravan to work.  Anyway, I was just curious if the board might know why they're so popular, how they became so popular, or any other trivial info on khakis.  Am I missing something?
Why must you be so judgmental in the way you phrase your questions? Couldn't you just say, "I am not a fan of khaki's, but I am interested to know why they are so popular with many other men?" Why must you make aspersions about accountants, small towns and minivans? Is that really how you judge people, because if so, I feel sorry for you. As to why khaki's are so popular, the history cited so far here is very accurate. Additionally, I think you need to look at the marketing machine of Levi Strauss who introduced Dockers in the mid 80's (I believe) as a way to expand beyond jeans and did a tremendous job of influencing our culture into accepting casual Friday's and casual workplace attire. Certainly khaki's and a golf shirt have become ubiquitous Friday attire in many offices, however that is no reason to look down upon those people. Bradford
post #18 of 132
I really hate khakis, with a passion, but I'm curious as to why they are so popular.  I think they look super tacky and cheap, regardless of brand, and make the wearer look like an accountant who lives in Smallville and drives a Dodge Caravan to work.  Anyway, I was just curious if the board might know why they're so popular, how they became so popular, or any other trivial info on khakis.  Am I missing something? ------------------------------------- I am an accountant that lives in a town of 15,000 people and drives actually a Honda Odessey.  You must know me.  I don't own a pocket protector though. In reality, khakis (more appropriately twill/poplin trousers as khaki is a color) are very easy to maintain and work with a lot of different outfits.  I quite like them but have limited my use of them only because casual Fridays in the office almost everyone is wearing a pair.
post #19 of 132
Another little bit of useless information - Khaki derives from the Urdu/Hindustani work for dust (Khak) which in turn comes to us from Persian. I believe the British Army officer was stationed in the Punjab, and was trying to find an alternative to the "Thin Red Line" uniforms.
post #20 of 132
There are better and worse khakis, in my opinion. If well cut from good fabric, they certainly have their place in one's informal (particularly warm-weather) wardrobe. I don't know Bill's Khakis (apart from the ads and their constituency here) but I would certainly be reluctant to pay a premium for such a relatively humble product. (I've yet to pay more than $20 for a pair of jeans in all my 46 years.) On a historic or etymological note, the term khaki is of Hindi origin, meaning dust-colored, and came to be associated with the twill uniforms of the British colonials who dominated India politically until independence in 1947.
post #21 of 132
I hate khakis also... not just dislike, hate. They are the epitome of boring. Though I see the appeal of them because they are so easy to wear. Dressier and more designed focused (slim fit, flat front, better cotton) khakis are fine though. I have a nice pair of RLPL ones, I really wouldn't consider them "khakis" though.
post #22 of 132
I also hate khakis and refuse to wear them.  They are anathema to everything I stand for. EDIT: When I refer to khakis, I am referring only to tan-colored cotton trousers. I have some tan-colored wool slacks, as well as cotton trousers in other colors (dark brown, olive, etc.), but I don't consider these khakis.
post #23 of 132
I'm neither an accountant, nor do I drive a van or live in a small town. Khakis are great. They go with everything. They are low maintenance. They are comfortable. They look good if they fit. Every well-dressed person should own them. The fashion conscious can set themselves apart from the herd by getting a pair that fits well. There are a million brands--it's just takes finding the one that fits your body type. Me? I love the LLBean Classic fit Double L's. Why is there an insistence that you be dressed up all the time? Do you wear your wool trousers when working in the yard, or when sitting around the house? This seems a little dandyish to me, and not in a good way.
post #24 of 132
Hate is a powerful word. We should all remove it from our world.
post #25 of 132
Style-wise, I have split personality syndrome. During the week, or whenever I wear a tie, I am all bespoke and put together and obessive, right down to my socks (cotton lisle for summer, wool for winter, silk with black tie). On the weekends and days off, I look like hell: khakis, t-shirts, cheap polos, moccasins. I know, I know. I'm going to hell.
post #26 of 132
I tend to think of khakis as work pants--not office work, but hauling topsoil to the garden, changing the car's oil, painting the baby's room kind of pants. I know others fancy them for casual settings, but I could not imagine putting on a pair for anything other than manual labor. A barely relevant aside: in the early 80s, during the popular ascendancy of the preppie vernacular, I knew a girl who adopted Khaki as a nickname. Pretentious it may have been, but it stuck with me to this day.
post #27 of 132
Suppressing... rant... Suffice it to say that I agree completely with Mike C. Wear jeans around the house or on the town. Wool or proper cotton trousers if your office dress code dictates.
post #28 of 132
Quote:
Hate is a powerful word. We should all remove it from our world.
No, but it should be reserved for Nazism, genocide, the politics of Mobuto Sese Seto (sp?) and the like. Not for clothes. Having said that, I would rather not ever be in a position where I would be forced to wear khakis (esp. if paired with a French Blue shirt (tucked in), a black belt, and black shoes of the Kenneth Cole chunky rubber sole variety. Add an overly large leather black leather blazer, and you'd find me huddled up in a fetal position in the shower saying "I'll tell you everything. Please, just give me my Paper Denims back. Please..."
post #29 of 132
Quote:
Why is there an insistence that you be dressed up all the time?  Do you wear your wool trousers when working in the yard, or when sitting around the house?  This seems a little dandyish to me, and not in a good way.
they suck, plain and simple : ugly, unfashionable. If I need to work around my appartment, I wear jeans. If I need to go out to the park to feed the ducks, I wear jeans. Otherwise, I lounge about in my silk pajamas when not expecting anyone. If I am expecting someone, I have a handful of cotton trousers from Costume National or Helmut Lang which will give me the needed relaxed look. .luc
post #30 of 132
I recall, in college, before the new denim revolution hit America - this is 1998 or so - I had friends who consciously refused to wear jeans - they only wore cords or khakis. Granted, this was a pretty homogenous group of guys. That seemed almost fashion forward at the time - east coast college campuses were still dominated by stonewashing and white baseball caps. Now it seems pretty dumb, to refuse to wear an entire category of pant. Despite agreement with most of this anti-khaki sentiment (which, not surprisingly, seems to break down on a somewhat generational level), I must admit to say I own and wear two pairs of cotton twill pants - one  brownish khaki and one olive. When the dry cleaning trips are fewer and farther between, I have no problem wearing these to work with a less formal shirt and tie. Then again, that's what I wore from 1st through 12th grade daily .
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