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Mixing Fabric

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
This occurred to me as a tangential point in the "Summer Wedding" thread-- to which I still wouldn't wear a black suit, BTW. Anyway, how adventurous do y'all get when mixing fabrics for jackets/trousers?  Crisp mohair jackets and baggy linen trousers would seem to be a mismatch, but does it work better in the reverse?  Estate tweed jackets and tropical-weight trousers are likely not going to work, but how about a rough tweed over flannels?  Serge blazer over flannels?  Soft flannel blazer over crisp twills? How much contrast is too much, and have you ever found that you wish you'd had more of it-- i.e., not been so anal about matching one texture with the other? Are there rules for making this simpler, and when are they profitably bent or broken? Anyone had a pleasant surprise on something that shouldn't have worked, but did?
post #2 of 8
I'm usually wearing navy flannel blazers or tweed jackets with either flannel, cavalry twill, or corduroy trousers since long before Roetzel recommended it in his book. Shirts should have texture too (oxfords, herringbones) and a knit tie is good with this type of ensemble. Cordovan or suede shoes (also texture) complement. The more texture. the more "country" the appearance. But if the weights of these elements are too dissimilar,that's when something's off (no smooth light 120s blazers with heavy flannel pants). Blues, browns, gray and olive colors predominate-few bright colors (maybe a red overplaid in  the jacket). Years ago, flannel was a summer material and you can see photos of the Duke of Windsor wearing a short sleeve polo shirt with gray flannels and white bucks, but I wouldn't do this.
post #3 of 8
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Estate tweed jackets and tropical-weight trousers are likely not going to work, but how about a rough tweed over flannels?  Serge blazer over flannels?  Soft flannel blazer over crisp twills?
All terrific looks, in my opinion.
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How much contrast is too much, and have you ever found that you wish you'd had more of it-- i.e., not been so anal about matching one texture with the other?
I like contrast in odd ensembles.  I think the important thing is to get the weights close.  You don't want to pair a 20 oz tweed with an 8 oz twill.  But a 16 oz twill would look great.
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Are there rules for making this simpler, and when are they profitably bent or broken?
Rules?  Regarding clothes?  Are you mad? EDIT: I agree with everything in STYLESTUDENT's post.
post #4 of 8
Ones I found to work : moleskin pants with cavalry twill sportscoat. Cavalry twill pants with velvet sportscoat. .Luc
post #5 of 8
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moleskin pants with cavalry twill sportscoat.
Wow, I don't think I've ever seen a cavalry twill odd jacket.
post #6 of 8
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(Luc-Emmanuel @ Feb. 09 2005,14:41) moleskin pants with cavalry twill sportscoat.
Wow, I don't think I've ever seen a cavalry twill odd jacket.
Holland and Holland did some absolute stunners in that genre -- you may be able to see some pictures in the chic simple books
post #7 of 8
Quote:
I'm usually wearing navy flannel blazers or tweed jackets with either flannel, cavalry twill, or corduroy trousers since long before Roetzel recommended it in his book. Shirts should have texture too (oxfords, herringbones) and a knit tie is good with this type of ensemble. Cordovan or suede shoes (also texture) complement. The more texture. the more "country" the appearance. But if the weights of these elements are too dissimilar,that's when something's off (no smooth light 120s blazers with heavy flannel pants). Blues, browns, gray and olive colors predominate-few bright colors (maybe a red overplaid in the jacket). Years ago, flannel was a summer material and you can see photos of the Duke of Windsor wearing a short sleeve polo shirt with gray flannels and white bucks, but I wouldn't do this.
Stylestudent, you farmer you. Jon. BTW: 1600 posts baby. LA Guy, here I come.
post #8 of 8
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Stylestudent, you farmer you.
Jon, It's true I sit on a board that has farmers on it (rural township planning commission) where I live. Not one of them has ever talked about mixing clothes textures (I know they talk about mixing different fertilizers together, but that's a more odorous (?) subject). I'm waiting for Ernest to read this.
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