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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 550

post #8236 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


. . . because they are too cool for the design threak or not cool enough for the design threak?

Definitely the latter. And my house is a mess.
post #8237 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


The ubiquity of the design is one of its virtues. Sometimes you just want your stool to look like a stool. Not everything needs to be "luxury."

 

Absolutely. Too many people forget that this was among the principle ambitions of twentieth century Northern European furniture design from the Bauhaus through the mid-century, and especially in the post-WW2 period. It wasn't all about painstaking cabinet-making. There's something to be said for social democratic design (and even Ikea...).

post #8238 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyingMonkey View Post

Absolutely. Too many people forget that this was among the principle ambitions of twentieth century Northern European furniture design from the Bauhaus through the mid-century, and especially in the post-WW2 period. It wasn't all about painstaking cabinet-making. There's something to be said for social democratic design (and even Ikea...).

That can be said about Eames and similar but not the Bauhaus. Mies projects were incredibly expensive and used exotic materials throughout.
post #8239 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

That can be said about Eames and similar but not the Bauhaus. Mies projects were incredibly expensive and used exotic materials throughout.

Mies's is really only one branch of Bauhaus thinking and may even be considered anomalous. While he was interested in developing a new, overarching aesthetic that celebrated the modern age (glass, steel, minimal visible structure, etc.), someone like Gropius would have rejected the idea of a universal aesthetic and advocated rational and efficient solutions best suited to each situation's individual circumstances. Alvar Aalto's stools and other designs are squarely Bauhaus in the more broad view of the school.
post #8240 of 8379
Good point, the overarching point that I'd like to make is that refining the aesthetic by taking away parts determined to be unnecessary puts a greater focus on what remains.

That focus requires those remaining parts to be executed with success, doing so is no easy task and this shows through in Mies' work with laborious detail in each aspect.

When you have things such as a molding replaced by a reveal between the wall and the floor that reveal must be created accurately and evenly throughout. The same idea extends to smaller items such as cabinet work and other furniture. Most famous modern works feature items which were complicated to create. In some cases, like the Aalto stool those complications were made easy to reproduce once the method was developed.

Any who the next post on my blog is now ready. biggrin.gif

My work continues on the floating credenzas, in this post I am cutting the major joinery which bring the cases together. I'm preparing the cherry case to for a show and so that case will be completed sooner than the walnut case. I begin this post working both at the same time, but the post ends will only the cherry case completed. The remainder of this series will focus on the cherry case.

https://brianholcombewoodworker.com/2016/10/04/the-floating-credenza-dovetails/

Cheers
Brian
post #8241 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Good point, the overarching point that I'd like to make is that refining the aesthetic by taking away parts determined to be unnecessary puts a greater focus on what remains.

That focus requires those remaining parts to be executed with success, doing so is no easy task and this shows through in Mies' work with laborious detail in each aspect.

When you have things such as a molding replaced by a reveal between the wall and the floor that reveal must be created accurately and evenly throughout. The same idea extends to smaller items such as cabinet work and other furniture. Most famous modern works feature items which were complicated to create. In some cases, like the Aalto stool those complications were made easy to reproduce once the method was developed.

Any who the next post on my blog is now ready. biggrin.gif

My work continues on the floating credenzas, in this post I am cutting the major joinery which bring the cases together. I'm preparing the cherry case to for a show and so that case will be completed sooner than the walnut case. I begin this post working both at the same time, but the post ends will only the cherry case completed. The remainder of this series will focus on the cherry case.

https://brianholcombewoodworker.com/2016/10/04/the-floating-credenza-dovetails/

Cheers
Brian

Not an expert, but workmanship looks impressive.

Why a floating credenza, though? Standing seems like it would be more useful/adaptable.

Also, what options would there be if one wanted to hide the joints? Would it necessarily mean weaker/worse construction?
post #8242 of 8379
Typical Bauhaus:

Ulm stool by Max Bill, designed for and used by the Ulm school, Bauhaus school successor (currently produced by Zanotta)

Edited by mafoofan - 10/4/16 at 7:00am
post #8243 of 8379

That looks like someone made it in their garage. 

post #8244 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by ethanm View Post

That looks like someone made it in their garage. 

Not far from the truth. The point was to make a cheap, simple-to-produce stool that could serve many different functions.
post #8245 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Not an expert, but workmanship looks impressive.

Why a floating credenza, though? Standing seems like it would be more useful/adaptable.

Also, what options would there be if one wanted to hide the joints? Would it necessarily mean weaker/worse construction?

Thank you!

Wall hung in this case because one of them is going to be used as a media cabinet, the other could be used the same way should the end user want me to make a pass through for wires in the case back. I like to have the media cabinet join up against the wall and make the pass through meet up to a pass through the drywall/facade. Makes for a clean aesthetic and the wires go completely unseen.

This is working on a similar idea as the Butler's desk, same aesthetic. I'm working toward eventually showing a few variations on that aesthetic. With a stand, without a stand, with sliding doors and without sliding doors.

I debated hiding the dovetail joints with full blind dovetails, no downside really and they're just as strong. The through tenons are stronger, I wanted to have a joint which will lock tightly without reliance upon glue being that the divider is load bearing in this case.

The walnut cabinet is for a client, he likes to see the joinery to the extent that one can see that it's joined. The butler's desk was very similar, that client also wanted an overall quiet piece that did show some joinery.

The cherry cabinet will be entered into a woodworking show, should it be accepted it will have to compete with some really loud work. So I decided to show through the dovetails on that as well.
post #8246 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Thank you!

Wall hung in this case because one of them is going to be used as a media cabinet, the other could be used the same way should the end user want me to make a pass through for wires in the case back. I like to have the media cabinet join up against the wall and make the pass through meet up to a pass through the drywall/facade. Makes for a clean aesthetic and the wires go completely unseen.

This is working on a similar idea as the Butler's desk, same aesthetic. I'm working toward eventually showing a few variations on that aesthetic. With a stand, without a stand, with sliding doors and without sliding doors.

I debated hiding the dovetail joints with full blind dovetails, no downside really and they're just as strong. The through tenons are stronger, I wanted to have a joint which will lock tightly without reliance upon glue being that the divider is load bearing in this case.

The walnut cabinet is for a client, he likes to see the joinery to the extent that one can see that it's joined. The butler's desk was very similar, that client also wanted an overall quiet piece that did show some joinery.

The cherry cabinet will be entered into a woodworking show, should it be accepted it will have to compete with some really loud work. So I decided to show through the dovetails on that as well.

Got it--if you need it to hold media equipment and pass-through to the drywall, makes sense.

Otherwise, I like the idea of a standing credenza because it functions and appears more as a piece of furniture than as a room feature. You can move it around to define spaces and it can be used to visually counterbalance other pieces (chairs, tables, etc.).

I understand why someone would want to show the joinery, but personally, I'd prefer the blind joints all around. More discreet and elegant. It would be enough to know for myself that the piece was well-made.
post #8247 of 8379
I like both, it is nice to see the back on cabinets where the back is attended to well so I can appreciate having them as a room divider. This same cabinet design could accommodate that quite easily and a low-ish credenza is one option I'll likely pursue....probably next year for the same show.

I tend to agree WRT hidden joinery, that is my taste as well. I have a sashimono obsession, in sashimono they almost never show joinery and the case work is typically made with full blind dovetails, however one expects that from sashimono since the makers are established and held to standards of their craft. I will continue to move in that direction, opting for hidden joinery as I take on new work and clients understand that while hidden the joinery is there.
post #8248 of 8379
Mammoth Chair in the "fluffy" varient from Norr11 seems rather comfy. I'd go for it in either camel or cognac leather, but the version in washed canvas also looks nice.



post #8249 of 8379
Their quality is underwhelming.
post #8250 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

Their quality is underwhelming.

Good info to have. We talking leather and material quality or just the general fit and finish?
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