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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 546

post #8176 of 8386
To distill it down to one economic principle: branding allows you to sell essentially similar products at vastly different prices.
post #8177 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post

Min wage is just a reference point. Actually, in Denmark, because incomes are uncommonly even in their distribution, manual workers tend to get paid disproportionately well compared to the US.

But it's not the primary thing causing the cost difference, you are right.

I don't think Eames is "less valuable" as a brand per se, but it is positioned in a completely different segment of the market. It has mass appeal.

Of course you're right that Eames designs tend to have quite an industrial production which does scale costs, but the Finn Juhl chair could be scaled if there was a market for it. The Finn Juhl chair is usually CNC-made/semi-handmade anyway.

I have a friend who is an expert woodworker/cabinetmaker who will make you the Model 45 for about £3k in walnut, entirely by hand.

No doubt they deploy CNC, but even so, it still requires more one-off work to make than the Eames.

Exactly to your point about being able to make a similar-quality, unlicensed version of the Model 45 for about half the price, take a look around at how cheap you can buy an unlicensed Eames lounge chair. In both cases, you are paying a premium to own the properly licensed/authorized version (not to open up that can of worms).
post #8178 of 8386
Hmm, but £3k is for a handmade Model 45, not a Chinese-made unlicensed one. A Chinese one costs about £500 delivered to the UK, whereas an Eames lounge chair tends to cost £700-800, even though it is a vastly more popular & mass-produced design.
post #8179 of 8386
You may be right that to execute the Model 45 perfectly is a more difficult task. But I still don't think that's what guides OneCollection's pricing.
post #8180 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post

Hmm, but £3k is for a handmade Model 45, not a Chinese-made unlicensed one. A Chinese one costs about £500 delivered to the UK, whereas an Eames lounge chair tends to cost £700-800, even though it is a vastly more popular & mass-produced design.

No, I meant U.S.-made replicas--but, like I said, I don't want to jump into that vortex/rabit-hole of a discussion.
post #8181 of 8386
Ah, I see. Agree that we should avoid the rabbit-hole.
post #8182 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post


I have a friend who is an expert woodworker/cabinetmaker who will make you the Model 45 for about £3k in walnut, entirely by hand.

If it costs them 2.5k to manufacture, then they will x2 to cover marketing, returns, shipping, agents fee, taxes etc. the retailer will then x2 that amount to cover all their expenses and there you have the retail price.

It's the same with clothing etc etc
post #8183 of 8386
Yeah, but the gross margin can be very different from product to product. It depends entirely on the firm's/brand's market power and their ability to price discriminate.
post #8184 of 8386
Hans Wegner J16 rocking chair, manufactured by Fredericia (~$1,800 USD retail):



Best deal out there, in my opinion. And looks great in almost any sort of room/interior.

I was speaking to one of the big-time vintage Danish furniture dealers in NYC a little while ago and he was lamenting that true cabinetmakers were all but extinct in Denmark these days. However, he noted that, in his opinion, PP Mobler and Fredericia still do honest work nearly on par with the old stuff. He didn't go into much detail as to why, but I didn't have much reason to doubt him as they are effectively his competition (at half the price in many cases).

Didn't have kind things to say about Carl Hansen and Fritz Hansen.
post #8185 of 8386
I mean, you can't seriously believe that the price of every product sold is simply a function of cost of production x 4.
post #8186 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post

I mean, you can't seriously believe that the price of every product sold is simply a function of cost of production x 4.

No, but I can see how you can apply a general rule of thumb to the industry, given similar business models.
post #8187 of 8386
Made in USA is definitely a "brand"...

But the people who are most gung-ho about buying in to the Made in the USA brand are generally not the same sort of people buying $10k chairs.

You pay your 100% premium to get your crescent wrenches made in the USA.
post #8188 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Made in USA is definitely a "brand"...

But the people who are most gung-ho about buying in to the Made in the USA brand are generally not the same sort of people buying $10k chairs.

You pay your 100% premium to get your crescent wrenches made in the USA.

People who pay $6,000 for an Eames lounge chair care if it's "Made in USA."
post #8189 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post


People who pay $6,000 for an Eames lounge chair care if it's "Made in USA."


Are you sure? Or do they care more about "Made in the 1st World." 

post #8190 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by ethanm View Post


Are you sure? Or do they care more about "Made in the 1st World." 

People who pay the premium for the licensed, authorized version of a design tend to care about the concept of authenticity--and where it is made matters in that respect. Hence, yes, I think there is a preference for American MCM designs to be American-made.

Put another way: to the extent "American Mid-Century Modern" matters to people, "Made in USA" likely does as well.
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