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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 545

post #8161 of 8386
Jesus , the man likes his leather. There's nothing odd about it.
post #8162 of 8386
Two foo.gif's in one thread, now the question is who will out foo.giffoo.gif
post #8163 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SirWilliam View Post

Sollos also comes in Elmo leathers. I will try to get some samples of their entire elegance line. BassamFellows recommend Elmo Baltique and Rustical as their high-end options but these are not smooth leathers. I will ask if Elmotique is a possibility.
The leather is important to me though being a design thread maybe I should keep that to myself. This chair doesn't have to be a show piece it just has to be something I enjoy and the leather is a big part of that for me. There are tons of great-looking high-quality armchairs on the market so I will find one with the type of leather I want. I will take a look at SIF.

What I didn't realize until this exercise is that going for the most natural full-aniline, non-coated top-grain leather doesn't always mean the smoothest softest leather. I have a lot of furniture from DeSede and some from Baxter and their top-of-the-line leathers are smooth and soft. But Walter Knoll's best leather is not smooth and while Elmo's best leather is Vegeta which is smooth and soft, it only comes in it's natural nude color and the next step down is Elmogrand which is not a smooth leather.

That surprised me as well when I was learning about upholstery leathers. They're not at all like calf skins prepared for shoes and so often times they do have an unusual feeling to them which seems to be part of an acquired appreciation. They're more like a blank canvas which develops over time.

Some of the best feeling leathers, IMO are not especially expensive. I like Spinneybeck Sabrina, it feels incredible but it's a middle of the road leather for full aniline full grain leathers.
post #8164 of 8386

Want to share a new lounge chair I got. It's a little funny looking, but I like it a lot. (Phone camera, sorry)

 

 

It's the Bollo chair from Fogia, designed by Andreas Engesvik. Better picture from Residence Magazine below, in black leather, mine is in wool fabric from Kvadrat.

 

post #8165 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

The Chair you posted is the Model 45 chair, and very nice. I prefer it over the chieftain.


It's a very nice chair. It also costs $9,801.00 at DWR? crazy.gif

I try not to be that guy in this thread, but can someone please explain to me why this chair costs nearly twice as much as a Eames Lounge Chair?
post #8166 of 8386
its in walnut and handmade in Denmark, so it should be at least double up.
post #8167 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

It's a very nice chair. It also costs $9,801.00 at DWR? crazy.gif

I try not to be that guy in this thread, but can someone please explain to me why this chair costs nearly twice as much as a Eames Lounge Chair?

They make a lot more of the Eames (an understatement) and its production is far more industrialized. The Model 45, with its solid, sculpted wood frame and traditional joinery, requires a lot more skilled labor and craftsmanship.
post #8168 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

its in walnut and handmade in Denmark, so it should be at least double up.

Not sure country of origin has much to do with it. If you tried to make a chair like that in the States, the labor costs would be similarly high.
post #8169 of 8386
A laborer in Denmark gets $20-40 an hour depending on skill level and Made in Denmark is a brand, which means more $$$.
post #8170 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

A laborer in Denmark gets $20-40 an hour depending on skill level and Made in Denmark is a brand, which means more $$$.

Yes, but "Made in USA" is a brand too--and while Danish labor costs are particularly high, American labor costs are not going to be so much lower as to explain much of the cost difference.
post #8171 of 8386
Yeah, labour costs are at least double in Denmark compared to USA. Minimum wage is effectively about €20, and an expert artisan will make multiples of that.

But it's about the brand, anyway.
post #8172 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post

Yeah, labour costs are at least double in Denmark compared to USA. Minimum wage is effectively about €20, and an expert artisan will make multiples of that.

But it's about the brand, anyway.

. . . because people putting together Eames lounge chairs for Herman Miller are getting paid minimum wage? Serious question. I actually have no idea. But comparing minimum wages is probably not the right place to start the comparison.

And Herman Miller is a less valuable brand than Onecollection? Eames is less valuable a name than Finn Juhl? I don't think brand value is the distinguishing factor either.

Bottom-line is that one chair is easier to produce than the other, regardless of where it's made or who makes it.
post #8173 of 8386
I wouldn't consider the Eames Lounge and Ottoman to be a benchmark of sorts, but if you want an idea of ranking and tiers in furniture then;

Manufactured furniture borrowing on design ---->High quality original design, manufactured with a little bit of hand work ---> Original Design manufactured with a lot of handwork ----> Short production semi-handmade furniture with a good bit of handwork ----> one off machine made studio furniture ----> one off hand made studio furniture.

This is how the cost works, which is why you see things like $50k walnut tables sold by Studio Furniture brands.

Add to the that the fact that items coming in from Denmark must be imported and it is expensive to ship furniture overseas. (and tax!)

Also designers and companies can price their product as they see fit.

Material does come into this, the quality of walnut required the Finn Juhl chairs is very high, so they're paying a premium for material and may have to toss 40-60% of it.

Then add to the that the fact that we scale pricing on percentages, 100% mark-up is a lot more for a $5000 chair (cost) than it is for a $50 chair.
post #8174 of 8386
Hakone Table by Barber & Osgerby for Galerie Kreo
Limited edition of 8 pieces

post #8175 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

. . . because people putting together Eames lounge chairs for Herman Miller are getting paid minimum wage? Serious question. I actually have no idea. But comparing minimum wages is probably not the right place to start the comparison.

And Herman Miller is a less valuable brand than Onecollection? Eames is less valuable a name than Finn Juhl? I don't think brand value is the distinguishing factor either.

Bottom-line is that one chair is easier to produce than the other, regardless of where it's made or who makes it.

Min wage is just a reference point. Actually, in Denmark, because incomes are uncommonly even in their distribution, manual workers tend to get paid disproportionately well compared to the US.

But it's not the primary thing causing the cost difference, you are right.

I don't think Eames is "less valuable" as a brand per se, but it is positioned in a completely different segment of the market. It has mass appeal.

Of course you're right that Eames designs tend to have quite an industrial production which does scale costs, but the Finn Juhl chair could be scaled if there were a market for it. The Finn Juhl chair is usually CNC-made/semi-handmade anyway.

I have a friend who is an expert woodworker/cabinetmaker who will make you the Model 45 for about £3k in walnut, entirely by hand.
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