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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 533

post #7981 of 8379
Can anyone point me to the Co. in EU that sells lighting & accessories of similar design/quality as Restoration Hardware in US?

https://www.restorationhardware.com/catalog/category/products.jsp?cellBackground=false&parentCatId=cat1598016&topCatId=cat160075&categoryId=cat3900063&sale=false


Edited by Medwed - 7/22/16 at 3:19am
post #7982 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by asifengdahl View Post

Im looking for metallic design of chairs with table, for a modern coffee shop.
What will be my key word in looking specific chairs?

Restaurant supply company.
post #7983 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

Can anyone point me to the Co. in EU that sells lighting & accessories of similar design/quality as Restoration Hardware in US?

https://www.restorationhardware.com/catalog/category/products.jsp?cellBackground=false&parentCatId=cat1598016&topCatId=cat160075&categoryId=cat3900063&sale=false


Technolumen, but possibly nicer and at a much higher price point. shog[1].gif
post #7984 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

Getting into French polish with shellac only. Amazing how low effort French Polish is if you learn to do it right. No sanding, no waiting for 72 hours to let the layers dry. No wonder it was used so widely for 100s of years, it is fantastic technique. I cannot imagine why it was forgotten and we all switched to stupid building layers and sanding them down masochism.

I like French polish, but I've never heard anyone describe it as 'low effort'.

If you can fill the pores successfully then getting from pore filling to a beautiful finish is actually pretty quick, but getting the pores filled is time consuming. Most people who do the work spend the majority of their time at that stage.

I do a light coat of shellac on furniture now, but not what one would consider french polish.
post #7985 of 8379
Just read your latest blog post, and I'm a bit confused about the bevels you cut in for the drawers. Is there a relief cut in the underside of the drawer front above to allow you to pull open the drawer?
post #7986 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I like French polish, but I've never heard anyone describe it as 'low effort'.

If you can fill the pores successfully then getting from pore filling to a beautiful finish is actually pretty quick, but getting the pores filled is time consuming. Most people who do the work spend the majority of their time at that stage.

I do a light coat of shellac on furniture now, but not what one would consider french polish.

To clarify, I restore old things for fun, I don't deal with wood that is completely bare (fortunately).
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Technolumen, but possibly nicer and at a much higher price point. shog[1].gif

Thank you , but honestly it is not even close to RH in variety of attractive designs. You guys in States don't know how good you have it with consumer market and quality of products. You can find anything in US for home decoration or DIY projects.....Europe is currently in embrace of cheap quasy-modern shit made in china. Don't let me start with DIY or woodworking supplies, they are online only. European hardware chains are selling products for retards and housewives. They have no clue what Shellac is and have no wood stain in the stores at all. German Bauhaus is a bit better but still not HomeDepot.
RESTORATION HARDWARE RULES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Edited by Medwed - 7/24/16 at 4:32am
post #7987 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I like French polish, but I've never heard anyone describe it as 'low effort'.

If you can fill the pores successfully then getting from pore filling to a beautiful finish is actually pretty quick, but getting the pores filled is time consuming. Most people who do the work spend the majority of their time at that stage.

I do a light coat of shellac on furniture now, but not what one would consider french polish.

To clarify, I restore old things for fun, I don't deal with wood that is completely bare (fortunately).

My understanding is that one of the points of French polishing is that, while it is incredibly time-consuming to do initially, it is also incredibly easy to repair. Is that correct?
post #7988 of 8379
Sorry Butch, It seems I left that out in my post shog[1].gif I forget if I covered it in previous posts at this point, but here is a photo of the groove in the drawer above;

4803A1A8-13AB-4933-832C-2393CDC4BF2D_zpskpatvbr0.jpg

MW, I find that restoration comes in handy at times, they do have some nice bauhaus looking things that aren't overly expensive that work as filler. For instance, I have something like nine ceiling mount lights, doing that in all Louis Poulsen, etc lighting gets outrageously expensive, so I did one in Luceplan, one in Poulsen and the remainder in RH. I have one remaining which I'll probably also pick something like Poulsen quality.

Bounder, the guys who do it day-in-day-out do it quickly but those years of experience are key to doing it at a reasonable pace. Even so it is time consuming by comparison to other methods. True, it is easy to bring back to life.

I like shellac as a general finish as well, I apply it by padding it on like a wipe-on finish until it starts to build, then I stop. It looks like a lacquer finish at that point, but is much easier to apply for me.
post #7989 of 8379
post #7990 of 8379
Beaded curtains and long window seat are ok in a context of its time , although because of mid-century furniture boom today it looks almost cliche. The rest of the space is awful. I don't care how lovely Wegner's chairs are individually altogether they look like bus station cafeteria, from anywhere USA. The space is impersonal, uncomfortable and does not invite to stay. As far as mid-century interiors that is as awful as it gets (especially third picture).

P.S. For those looking to buy at the auction; avoid those molested, hybrid Saarinen side tables with aftermarket tops (called custom by salesman). I have to say that looking at the auction items, the condition is appalling. I know it have been under heavy use for decades but to me the condition is not vintage or used but simply trashed, probably due to already shitty construction methods.
Serving cart in horrid cond.: https://new.liveauctioneers.com/item/46615866_huxtable-dessert-cart
This one is worth restoring: https://new.liveauctioneers.com/item/46615869_serving-cabinet-from-the-pool-room
Edited by Medwed - 7/25/16 at 1:44am
post #7991 of 8379
Terrible what has happened there, who would want to be the man to kick The Four Seasons out of the Seagram building?
post #7992 of 8379
Always found that interior slightly boring. I am looking forward to the new Winfield interior at the new location.
post #7993 of 8379
post #7994 of 8379
Boring after seeing people base a lot of work on it for 50 years...sure, but boring in the same way that masterworks are boring.
post #7995 of 8379
You fuckers. Now I want to try my hand at shellac.
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