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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 524

post #7846 of 8386
Thank you! I also updated that last post to hopefully make a bit more sense. Sometimes I have to walk away and reread it a couple times before the errors stand out.
post #7847 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

bounder, no makers mark as of yet. I just sign with a pencil or more often I don't sign.

I do have a blog, started it a few months back and it's geared toward the nitty gritty;

https://brianholcombewoodworkerblog.wordpress.com

I can't say that your blog really advances your quest for on-line anonymity.

As for a maker's mark, you really should get one. Your work deserves it.

I have a friend who got some small brass coins made up. Each one has a symbol he designed and they are numbered sequentially. He insets them somewhere where they won't be readily visible, usually on the bottom or the back. They look just fantastic and they instantly mark the piece out as something very special, even to someone who can't appreciate the craftsmanship. You should look into this.
post #7848 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

I can't say that your blog really advances your quest for on-line anonymity.

As for a maker's mark, you really should get one. Your work deserves it.

I have a friend who got some small brass coins made up. Each one has a symbol he designed and they are numbered sequentially. He insets them somewhere where they won't be readily visible, usually on the bottom or the back. They look just fantastic and they instantly mark the piece out as something very special, even to someone who can't appreciate the craftsmanship. You should look into this.

All great cabinet makers never even bothered to sign their works. On the rarest occasion, they would sign underside with the pencil. That trick with a copper coin....uhoh.gif
post #7849 of 8386
I participate in a woodworking forum which requires full names, so even before this there is little anonymity left.

Im up in the air about signing or a makers mark to some degree. There is little history of woodworkers taking credit for their work in such a way until the 20fh century, but it is typical to take credit currently. I like the studio markings that some use (markings of a cabinet shop, ect).
post #7850 of 8386
I worked for ~9months in construction during the recession while I was between architecture jobs. One of the guys I worked with was an amazing woodworker but also a degenerate drunk. We made this base for a pedestal sink and I told him he should sign the base before we installed it because it was so beautiful, so he signed it-
Warning: NSFW! (Click to show)
I fucked your mom in this bathroom and her pussy smelled like shit.
-Jeff
post #7851 of 8386
uhoh.gif
post #7852 of 8386
lol8[1].gif
post #7853 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I participate in a woodworking forum which requires full names, so even before this there is little anonymity left.

Im up in the air about signing or a makers mark to some degree. There is little history of woodworkers taking credit for their work in such a way until the 20fh century, but it is typical to take credit currently. I like the studio markings that some use (markings of a cabinet shop, ect).

There is little history of woodworkers taking credit for their work because they were consider tradesmen rather than artists. Medwed's commendable reticence aside, that was then, this is now.

I'm sure you are more familiar with the various ways of marking your work than I am, but you are doing nobody any favors by not marking your work. Signing it with a pencil may be traditional, but it's not as permanent as it could be and, in the modern day, work like yours deserves better. Think of that poor guy at the Antiques Road Show in 2250.

I have had this discussion with artists in other contexts. I can tell you, categorically, to mark/sign and number your work as well as keep a record of what you have produced. Even if you don't see any need for it now, it's pretty likely that someday, you'll be extremely glad you did.

I can attest that the hidden, inset brass plate is much more attractive than a stamp or a brand. From what I have seen of your style, I think it would work particularly well. But you really should be doing something.
post #7854 of 8386
Most brands I know even from back in mcm days, have put some sort of sticker/mark under the underside og their pieces, so buyers can see what they are buying.
post #7855 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Think of that poor guy at the Antiques Road Show in 2250.

That gave me a chuckle.
post #7856 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Moving right along;


Finishing will take a while, but I got it started today. French polish....ugh...this is about three hours of labor...four sides to go. The finish will shrink overnight and require more build up.


I saw a video that I guess you linked before (or maybe I just looked it up myself), on French polishing. Man, it is indeed labor intensive and is an exercise in restraint because it's obvious you have to use a very small amount of lacquer/shellac when doing it and there's especially no shortcuts when you are doing the first stages of filling up the holes/crevices with pumice.

SG, have you ever considered using urushi and learning its application and curing process? I would think that's the next step in your journey since you are exploring and perfecting Japanese techniques.
post #7857 of 8386
Exactly, then it shrinks over a couple of days and you do it a second time, hah.

I've thought of urushi, but I have a few hills to climb before I start into that. It's a specialized finish, basically small parts only, and so it would have limited use for me, but may still be of use.

Thanks for the thoughts on marking/makers mark. I tend to agree that a perminant mark is in order, a makers mark in this case of the "cabinet shop" then a signature. The reason for the blog is documentation, it forces me to photograph processes which in today's world people do like to see the detail of how something is produced.
post #7858 of 8386
What do people think of Gubi's Beetle Chair?

post #7859 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Loathing View Post

What do people think of Gubi's Beetle Chair?


Quite like the base and how the legs taper a bit towards the end, but the seat just feels wrong for some reason and looks like a cheap office chair from the seventies.
post #7860 of 8386
SG, thanks for the sharing the blog link. Love what you're doing.
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