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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 522

post #7816 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

You should be fine then. I wanted to point it out because i've seen some people not realize the importance of letting a mattress breath on the bottom. smile.gif

Do appreciate the inquiry, actually wondered about it before when I put it together but forgot to ask about it.

post #7817 of 8386
If you can at some point double the height, so you can add pull out coat rags etc.
post #7818 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by kindofyoung View Post

I'm no SkinnyGoomba, but I spent the afternoon putting this together and I'm pretty happy with how it turned out smile.gif


My own design, consisting of two old IKEA Malm drawers and a bunch of plywood. It's in a student-room so creative storage is a must + not allowed to damage the walls in any way so I let the headboard extend past the bed, making room for putting up a small "wall-mounted" shelf (or several)

Would like to put up some kind of graphic/painting/poster/something over the headboard, so I'll gladly take any suggestions for what type/style.
(The room is largely whites and light plywood, except for the drawers and soon-to-be-bought bedcover which both are darkbrown, almost black)

Paint those drawer doors white....otherwise as a student where money is better invested in beer and women its okay. You could always use the head board for a few small framed pics. Nice bedside table and off you go. smile.gif
post #7819 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

If you can at some point double the height, so you can add pull out coat rags etc.

The traditional best-practices dorm room approach is to build a "bunk" bed that has only the upper bunk. The bottom of the bed is typically about 140 cm above the ground. This leaves enough space between the bed and the ceiling to sit up and enough space between the bed and the floor to create a comfortable space to hang out and, ah, entertain.
post #7820 of 8386
Not allowed to damage the walls in any way (even if I repair it after) so I doubt I could go much higher without losing stability


Regarding painting the drawers, I think it'll be fine as it is once a bedcover in the same color is on. Also, the way the room is set up the bed will double as the "sofa" so a dark cover will probably look decent for longer periods of time than a white/light one would.
post #7821 of 8386
Some of the nitty gritty of my humidor build;

Hinges installed Using Brusso stop hinges. These are good, unfortunately I found something better right after the fact but not enough of an improvement to change....talking about the Neat Hinge II.





Sizing material for the tray.



Chopping dovetails for the tray.





Outside of the tray complete.



Next will be the Kimiko latticework for the bottom of the tray.
post #7822 of 8386
The insert is too shallow , imho. How do you maintain the seal to keep moisture in?
post #7823 of 8386
When are you going to start machining your own hardware to make sure it is up to par with your woodwork?
post #7824 of 8386
post #7825 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

The insert is too shallow , imho. How do you maintain the seal to keep moisture in?

It will be fine, the gap is tight enough to catch a .002" feeler gauge all around and the top clicks down closed. Taller inserts would hang up the lid and I would have to relieve them in a way that is worse at the front lip for sealing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

When are you going to start machining your own hardware to make sure it is up to par with your woodwork?

Believe it or not, once of my friends and I have discussed this, he went as far as to have a jeweler make the hardware for one cabinet. Suffice to say it is prohibitively expensive.

Hardware is one of those things that is incredibly expensive to prototype, in terms of labor, and reasobly cheap once produced at some scale....given that it isn't hand wrought copper, which is what I actually want.
post #7826 of 8386

Soon SG will have more expensive furniture-making tools than furniture.

post #7827 of 8386
Moving right along;



Finishing will take a while, but I got it started today. French polish....ugh...this is about three hours of labor...four sides to go. The finish will shrink overnight and require more build up.

post #7828 of 8386
Ahhh-h, that is beautiful.
IS the whole insert removable? Would love to see it. I prolly missed it somewhere in your previous posts but what kind of wood is it? What is your method for finishing? Just sandpapers? Is this shellac finish or something else?
post #7829 of 8386
Thank you! The insert is fixed, but the tray is removeable. The insert is not actually glued but friction fit because the two woods (Spanish cedar and walnut) will move at different rates.

The polish is far from finished, but so far that is the result of a shellac/burnishing process. Shellac is applied into a wadded up wool pad with a cotton cover and the you burnish in until the grain is filled using pumice to help the process. Once that is completed I leveled it flat with sandpaper and then used a more diluted version of the same shellac to make the high gloss. I'll continue working it out for a few days per side to ensure that the grain does not reappear. It's a long and tedious process that I don't much enjoy, but I think a humidor deserves a shine.
post #7830 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Thank you! The insert is fixed, but the tray is removeable. The insert is not actually glued but friction fit because the two woods (Spanish cedar and walnut) will move at different rates.

The polish is far from finished, but so far that is the result of a shellac/burnishing process. Shellac is applied into a wadded up wool pad with a cotton cover and the you burnish in until the grain is filled using pumice to help the process. Once that is completed I leveled it flat with sandpaper and then used a more diluted version of the same shellac to make the high gloss. I'll continue working it out for a few days per side to ensure that the grain does not reappear. It's a long and tedious process that I don't much enjoy, but I think a humidor deserves a shine.

I admire your dedication. The polishing is a torturous process, I doubt anyone enjoys it.
Do you let it air dry or do you have a drying camera?

If people knew how much time and effort is involved in finishing they would realise how ridiculously low the prices are for handmade furniture and accessories.
At least we have stores to go to for supplies and tools, how furniture makers were doing it before I don't wanna think about it....baldy[1].gif
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