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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 509

post #7621 of 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

$200 may seem absurd and probably is a bit wasted on a fancy version of a crate, or in corbu's case a fancy version of a wine case, however not too unreasonable considering the work involved.

http://www.eaglebaywood.com/dovetail_drawers/
post #7622 of 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

It occurred to me the Jasper crate would pair nicely to the Piochair as a side table.

I think the cats would manage to knock it over. After it was knocked over they would then either crouch on it and purr or involve it in their play. Cats are very inventive in playing with their toys and I predict I would have to endlessly retrieve smaller toys from inside the box just as I currently do from underneath the furniture.
post #7623 of 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

http://www.eaglebaywood.com/dovetail_drawers/

Half blind equal spaced dovetails are quick and easy production stuff. Not quite the same as through dovetails, which are saw cut and chopped, not routed out.

Now I'll make a note, you'll see often times that people who do handmade half-blind dovetails, such as I biggrin.gif, will do them on an English pattern, which is not possible to machine (at least with normal production machinery), they're notable for having thin pins, typically thinner than machinery would allow. They also look nicer to my eye.
post #7624 of 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

http://www.eaglebaywood.com/dovetail_drawers/

Half blind equal spaced dovetails are quick and easy production stuff. Not quite the same as through dovetails, which are saw cut and chopped, not routed out.

Now I'll make a note, you'll see often times that people who do handmade half-blind dovetails, such as I biggrin.gif, will do them on an English pattern, which is not possible to machine (at least with normal production machinery), they're notable for having thin pins, typically thinner than machinery would allow. They also look nicer to my eye.

Which kind of dovetails are used on the box under discussion? To my untrained eye, they look much simpler than your "jigsaw" ones and dead easy to do with a computerized saw.
post #7625 of 8487
Writing this while sitting in a grand repost. Nothing special about it from a comfort/ergonomics standpoint--stressless is far better and I venture that even the piobaire chair is more comfortable. This is a design object. I will say the fabric is very nice though.
post #7626 of 8487
Couple other things to watch out for that can help to distinguish handmade and machine made. I don't mean to imply that machine made is bad, it can and often is very good if done properly, but handmade is handmade.

It becomes an expensive proposition, that most manufacturers will decline, to start including things like miter edge dovetails or full blind dovetails into casework, but they were part and parcel of high quality casework some time ago (like 200 years ago) and still in quality furniture in some areas.

If you will recall what the case looks like from the page or two prior, this is a set of miter edge dovetails on the inside of the case. They show cleanly like a plain miter, but a bit more structure to them.





Here is the finished outside of the case as well



Drywall work is next....oddly enough I enjoy doing that, but waiting until next week as I plan to do some painting.
Edited by SkinnyGoomba - 2/12/16 at 3:54pm
post #7627 of 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Which kind of dovetails are used on the box under discussion? To my untrained eye, they look much simpler than your "jigsaw" ones and dead easy to do with a computerized saw.

Those are through dovetails, easy enough to make the cuts by machine, but waste between the pins would typically need to be cut by hand.

For effective process they're likely doing as much machine work as possible.
post #7628 of 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

I can't say that, not having sat on it. The intent seems to be to create a bench that included a comfortable seat. It might well have worked. If it did, this might actually be very good design.

Yeaaaa, but is this design really comfy?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I think the cats would manage to knock it over. After it was knocked over they would then either crouch on it and purr or involve it in their play. Cats are very inventive in playing with their toys and I predict I would have to endlessly retrieve smaller toys from inside the box just as I currently do from underneath the furniture.

So you are definitely buying it?


P.S. Nice medicine cabinet SG. You are not worried that the solid wood and moisture might result in warping? I'd be worried about the doors.
post #7629 of 8487
Those cabinets look great
post #7630 of 8487
Thank you!
post #7631 of 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

P.S. Nice medicine cabinet SG. You are not worried that the solid wood and moisture might result in warping? I'd be worried about the doors.

I dunno...the non-solid wood vanities and medicine cabinets in my apartments have always turned to shit as something gets wet and starts to puff up in some corner where the paint/plasticized veneer has started to fail.

I'd take a little warping risk over that.
post #7632 of 8487
Good question, I planned the system of battens and the wood choices such as material, quality and grain orientation around minimising the possibility of odd movement.

Straight grained and quarter sawn cypress is one the most stable choices of material that can be obtained at a reasonable rate, it does well in humid environments and does not move much seasonally. Its a predictable wood, which is exactly what is needed for such a job. That is one of the reasons why so many historical buildings used cypress for exterior doors.

The door battens, rails and stiles are designed to allow seasonal movement of the main panel without distortion.
post #7633 of 8487
Thank you . I've learned something again from you. Quarter sawn does not cup.
post #7634 of 8487
It's not that it can't cup, just far less prone to it than flat sawn material,
post #7635 of 8487
Quote:
Originally Posted by ppllzz View Post

Writing this while sitting in a grand repost. Nothing special about it from a comfort/ergonomics standpoint--stressless is far better and I venture that even the piobaire chair is more comfortable. This is a design object. I will say the fabric is very nice though.


I've yet to sit in one myself but I figured this would be the case. How did it compare to the Eames?
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