or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 504

post #7546 of 8379
Rud Rasmussen is really impressive, I'm amazed that they can keep it up without absolutely insane pricing.

Foo, the quality of lumber spec'd by danish brands is pretty high up there. I know Carl Hansen, for instance spec's lumber typically 150-200 years old before it's sawn for use. The top shelf stuff from them is typically ash or oak, even though many will be a premium for walnut.

The ash and oak they use is very high quality, I would not be shocked if it is some of the highest quality available through a major manufacturer.
post #7547 of 8379
The vase thing seems problematic for Bounder as it clearly discounts the fact that there are many vases out there that exist solely as decorative vases. In fact the official definitions I see say things like "a decorative container, typically made of glass or china and used as an ornament or for displaying cut flowers".

I have a couple of japanese vases with holes in the bottom...those are pretty useless if the only purpose is to hold flowers.
post #7548 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I have bonsai stands in my house for tropical bonsai. The Bonsai go outside every summer and rather than rearrange my whole interior I simply put some chinese pots on the stands, one is a rice container and the other is a wine vessel. Both of these are entirely useless as those objects currently, because I'm not going to store rice or wine in either of them.

They could do a fine or miserable job of that intended purpose, but I'll never know, I just look at them and think about how much I like how they look. They're not particularly notable, just some random Qing Dynasty works of questionable origin (meaning they're probably early 20th century repros).

So there is a space for functional pieces that go largely unused because either their function is no longer an everyday need, or because they're ascribed a name like 'vase' so that they can appeal to a wider audience.

I don't know many people who collect art glass for the sake of collecting art glass, but there are plenty who have bowls and vases that go unused and amount to nothing more than decoration. I don't over indulge in this, but I do see the appeal of art glass, sculpture and pottery.

First, what happened to the Multiquote button?

Second, I don't see anything wrong with this. Personally, I don't like knickknacks and something that pretended to by a vase but could not be used as a vase would get on my nerves as I would find it slightly pretentious.

But you are doing something else, I think. In fact, a couple of different things. While an object might be currently useless, that does not mean it is either pretentious or badly-designed. It might have been a fantastic rice container, in its day. Something that is what it is but which is no longer useful in the modern world is, to me, very different from something that pretends to be something it isn't.

One of the things I find most attractive in antiques is when they are, or rather, were, functional objects made beautiful. For example,

2493778044_8cc5ba793e.jpg

These are standardized weights that were use in Babylon about 3000 years ago. Of course, they have no use today but that doesn't make them any less compelling.

And I have no problem with things that make no pretensions to be anything other than pure form, like sculptures or wall art. I do not like art glass but only because having it around leaves me in a constant state of anxiety.
post #7549 of 8379
Disregard
post #7550 of 8379
Directly from them and via Carl Hansen, who acquired them a couple years ago.

http://www.rudrasmussen.com


Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Rud Rasmussen is really impressive, I'm amazed that they can keep it up without absolutely insane pricing.

Foo, the quality of lumber spec'd by danish brands is pretty high up there. I know Carl Hansen, for instance spec's lumber typically 150-200 years old before it's sawn for use. The top shelf stuff from them is typically ash or oak, even though many will be a premium for walnut.

The ash and oak they use is very high quality, I would not be shocked if it is some of the highest quality available through a major manufacturer.

Their pricing isn't cheap, but they have been in same location since I don't know when, so their running cost has been very low. I actually tried buying the building last year, but someone else got it, so they are going to move to something more up to date.

Most if not all use FSC certified wood, from danish forests, which adds to the cost. I don't know if it's the best, but its up there.
post #7551 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I have a couple of japanese vases with holes in the bottom...those are pretty useless if the only purpose is to hold flowers.

Once again, I am not saying there is anything inherently wrong in treating something as a pure art object even when it was supposed to be something else. I am saying that the form-follows-function "rule" has pretty obviously been violated.

With respect to your Japanese "vases" that have holes in the bottom, there is a good chance they were originally intended to be lamp bases rather than vases.
post #7552 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

Once again, I am not saying there is anything inherently wrong in treating something as a pure art object even when it was supposed to be something else. I am saying that the form-follows-function "rule" has pretty obviously been violated.

With respect to your Japanese "vases" that have holes in the bottom, there is a good chance they were originally intended to be lamp bases rather than vases.

But like...are you ignoring the part where the literal definition of the word vase is a decorative object...one that sometimes holds cut flowers?

A vase doesn't have to hold things to be a medium for paint/glaze or sculptural expression.

What...are you going to say that painted canvases are stupid because canvas is meant to be worn/used as cloth and painting on it and stretching it out on the wall defeats the form following the function?

Many vases are art more than they are design. This makes sense for vases...even when being used for their intended purpose of holding flowers, they are simply an attractive thing to look at. Nobody needs a bouquet of cut flowers like they need a chair or a table--we have them because they are pretty.
Designers might create a vase that excels at holding certain arrangements of flowers (e.g. the Aalto vase and tulips), but that doesn't invalidate the fact that other vases aren't intended to hold flowers at all--they are simply pieces of art made to look beautiful without the addition of flowers.
post #7553 of 8379




post #7554 of 8379
USM Haller. There's a lot of for sale secondhand, so if you can find enough in the same color, you can get it at a good price.

It's rare to seem them in a home environment
post #7555 of 8379
I saw them in IDEAT (french design magazine) , in a home and have been debating them ever since.

I'm thinking black or midnight blue in the 3/s configuration (90 inches) against a wood paneled wall.
post #7556 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

USM Haller. There's a lot of for sale secondhand, so if you can find enough in the same color, you can get it at a good price.

It's rare to seem them in a home environment

I have one as a long TV stand and LP storage. It is certainly a furniture that looks better new and on the pictures.
post #7557 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

I have one as a long TV stand and LP storage. It is certainly a furniture that looks better new and on the pictures.

Yours hasn't aged well? I've been planning on buying two of the long cabinets.
post #7558 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

I have one as a long TV stand and LP storage. It is certainly a furniture that looks better new and on the pictures.

Are all the panels metal? Did you drill holes in the back to run cables for your A/V equipment?
post #7559 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

Are all the panels metal? Did you drill holes in the back to run cables for your A/V equipment?

All metal, high tensile. I have no equipment in there just LPs and cameras. No drilling, one can always take down one rear panel.
P.S. I use laptop to watch DVDs (twice a year may be) the rest of the time I stream programming from laptop to TV via wifi.
Audio equipment I have (vintage Marantz) is too beautiful and heavy to hide there.
post #7560 of 8379

Rago modern auction is coming up. Some good lamps and close enough that you can check them out in person.

 

http://www.ragoarts.com/auctions/2016/02/28/modern-design

 

lefty

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata