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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 497

post #7441 of 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I think often it has to be their copy writers. My wife and I were discussing Holbein's 'The Ambassadors'. The anamorphic skull was written about as some grand expression about pointless vanities. Now I obviously have no idea if Holbein was attempting to make some grand gesture, but knowing a few painters I would say....probably not.

That kind of stuff is pervasive in modern and contemporary art, to the point that it most often causes me to roll my eyes long before taking it with even remote seriousness.

The same BS exists in furniture/carpentry. For ever I've been hearing about how Japanese use planes where they pull rather than push and the reasoning behind it. This is attributed from a western point of view as being related to religion and how it's bringing the spirit of the wood toward you. In speaking with my Japanese tool dealer (who is actually Japanese and from Japan) it is because smallish folks need to use the largest muscles in their upper body to pull very wide planes.

So if I am making a point, hah, it is that this stuff is almost always for practical reasons, then someone comes along and assigns something else to it.

I went to a Frank Harmon lecture last month, and he talked about these sort of overly serious descriptions in architecture. He picked descriptions written about AIA Virginia award winning projects, and the rewrote them. One talked about "the warmth and organic nature of the materials used in entry sequence of the building served to reinforce the company's corporate image", and his rewrite was something like "we used evenly spaced 2"x2" reclaimed oak to clad the walls in the elevator lobby."
post #7442 of 8380
Here's one of the shelves of our new fireplace wall. Red artglass lamp, Huichol gato we bought on our Mexican trip last year, and wine books.


post #7443 of 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I always suspected you were a saint and this proves it.

Seriously, my chairs are no more fugly than a Grand Repo or Eames. If they came with a 5k price tag and were strewn across AD articles you'd be all over them. Probably if even someone else in this thread presented them, like FF or Matt, you would have had a far less problem with them (that goes for some other folks too).

I'm looking at them right now, thinking about coffee in front of the fireplace tomorrow morning, and smiling.

This is all delusion.
post #7444 of 8380

Jesus fucking Christ. 

 

lefty

post #7445 of 8380
Glorious thread is glorious.
post #7446 of 8380
piobaire i looked through this thread for 10 minutes so i could find a pic of the recliners you posted

they did not disappoint in their ugliness. honestly just awful. you would've done better with a poang from ikea.
post #7447 of 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by ppllzz View Post

piobaire i looked through this thread for 10 minutes so i could find a pic of the recliners you posted

they did not disappoint in their ugliness. honestly just awful. you would've done better with a poang from ikea.

laugh.gif
post #7448 of 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by js4design View Post

I went to a Frank Harmon lecture last month, and he talked about these sort of overly serious descriptions in architecture. He picked descriptions written about AIA Virginia award winning projects, and the rewrote them. One talked about "the warmth and organic nature of the materials used in entry sequence of the building served to reinforce the company's corporate image", and his rewrite was something like "we used evenly spaced 2"x2" reclaimed oak to clad the walls in the elevator lobby."

Hah, I love it.

On that same note of avoiding unnecessary pretension, I've enjoyed watching or reading (can't remember which) an interview with Bunshaft, the architect who designed the Beinecke Library. He was describing his process which he described as simply utilizing a good mental library of design ideas, not just from architecture but everything and basically having a good 'aha' moment which nearly ended in disaster but lucked out to be a wonderful building.
post #7449 of 8380
Piobaire, why do you have this chip on your shoulder? If you think he is deluded, let him be. I don't, but there are others who can learn from him.

Unloveable as he may be at times, there is actually an overarching theme to his choices - which he has explained multiple times.

Just because you can't or won't understand his POV doesn't invalidate it.

The last few pages remind me of the tonal vs atonal debate - yeah there are those who feel that music should sound conventionally nice (furniture should be comfortable), and those who think that music can be an intellectual exercise (your furniture should serve a purpose).

Yeah, there is a correlation between the latter camp and pretentiousness, but there is also a correlation between the former camp and mediocrity.
post #7450 of 8380
I think this is unfair. I posted a picture of my new recliners, and have been rather good natured over the slew of insults, have I not? I also do understand his POV; I just don't fully agree with it.

I am mediocre so that's pretty on target. smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post

Piobaire, why do you have this chip on your shoulder? If you think he is deluded, let him be. I don't, but there are others who can learn from him.

Unloveable as he may be at times, there is actually an overarching theme to his choices - which he has explained multiple times.

Just because you can't or won't understand his POV doesn't invalidate it.

The last few pages remind me of the tonal vs atonal debate - yeah there are those who feel that music should sound conventionally nice (furniture should be comfortable), and those who think that music can be an intellectual exercise (your furniture should serve a purpose).

Yeah, there is a correlation between the latter camp and pretentiousness, but there is also a correlation between the former camp and mediocrity.
post #7451 of 8380
Chair.

post #7452 of 8380
And a nice one, at that.
post #7453 of 8380
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post
The way the vertical supports are structured creates shelves on the sides of the case, which can be useful for organization. Maybe more importantly, it also changes how the whole piece relates to the space around it. Conventional bookcases face one direction and thus have a defined front, with the other sides to be ignored. This one faces all directions. There's no front or back, with all sides worthy of facing outward, opening up many new possibilities for placement.


I guess that explains the difference.  I don't have any place in my house where a bookshelf would make sense except against a wall.

post #7454 of 8380
I could see wanting to place certain objects on the sides even up against a wall, but placement of the bookshelf in a room would be key. The design almost feels like it's screaming to be used as a room divider.
post #7455 of 8380
A bookshelf as a room divider is quite fine, still I think that have single uprights turned the direction of the shelves and set in from the sides accomplishes both tasks (you can set the books either direction, use it as a room divider, etc).

I'd like to have a bookcase room divider that are not particularly tall, when they are tall they're usually a bit unnerving.
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