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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 491

post #7351 of 8379

So based on what I've read here alongside some perusing the internet and Wikipedia, the general focuses of various movements can be summarized as:

 

Modernism - austere, clean, lack of gratuitous adornment, using material to provide texture as opposed to form.  Essentially a backlash against Deco/Nouveau's opulence. Started early 20th century-ish, gained real traction post WWII, continues at various levels in contemporary design depending on designer and application.  MCM is a subset thereof.

 

Post-Modern - backlash against Modernism, bring back the details!  Revival of some (not all) classical design concepts, as well as introducing asymmetry, organic shapes, brutalism, etc. as a way to add depth and interest to contrast modernism's lack thereof.  Gained traction in the 80's (?), and also continues today depending on designer and application.  

 

Seem about right?  

What I struggle with is when I'm browsing a store or looking at pictures online (this thread for example), how can I distinguish between various subsets of Post/Modernism? Are there defining visual characteristics that can reliably distinguish Danish from American from Bauhaus?  Or is that an issue of doing my homework and learning individual designers' styles and history?

post #7352 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

You could get new non-display model from Flos for $2500 with a single phone call.

Their website says 3k and then they'll probably be shipping on top of that.

Question about the lamp: is the length of the arc adjustable? Part of why the Arco is tempting is it seems to have the longest reach which is paramount for my seating area.

Also, my floor lamp purchase shall be the last purchase. Still need various tables, day bed, and two chairs.
post #7353 of 8379
Yes, it's adjustable.
post #7354 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleeves345 View Post

So based on what I've read here alongside some perusing the internet and Wikipedia, the general focuses of various movements can be summarized as:

Modernism - austere, clean, lack of gratuitous adornment, using material to provide texture as opposed to form.  Essentially a backlash against Deco/Nouveau's opulence. Started early 20th century-ish, gained real traction post WWII, continues at various levels in contemporary design depending on designer and application.  MCM is a subset thereof.

Post-Modern - backlash against Modernism, bring back the details!  Revival of some (not all) classical design concepts, as well as introducing asymmetry, organic shapes, brutalism, etc. as a way to add depth and interest to contrast modernism's lack thereof.  Gained traction in the 80's (?), and also continues today depending on designer and application.  

Seem about right?  
What I struggle with is when I'm browsing a store or looking at pictures online (this thread for example), how can I distinguish between various subsets of Post/Modernism? Are there defining visual characteristics that can reliably distinguish Danish from American from Bauhaus?  Or is that an issue of doing my homework and learning individual designers' styles and history?


For design to be Bauhaus, the designer needs to have attended Bauhaus school of design. Bauhaus furniture is usually metal framed and slightly Art Deco.

Most of the well known italian firms like Cappelini, Flexform, Poliform, other company with form in its name etc. are all contemporary/post modern. There is a sub set in contemporary which is almost art like Campana Bothers.

Brutalism was part of modernism and existed in the same time period, just to confuse you even more.
post #7355 of 8379
Quote:
 Brutalism was part of modernism and existed in the same time period, just to confuse you even more.

:fu:

post #7356 of 8379
If you are "new" to design have a look at the architecture thread, the different types of design makes a lot more sense in architecture and is a lot more visible. It will give you an idea how the furniture looks.
post #7357 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Their website says 3k and then they'll probably be shipping on top of that.

Question about the lamp: is the length of the arc adjustable? Part of why the Arco is tempting is it seems to have the longest reach which is paramount for my seating area.

Also, my floor lamp purchase shall be the last purchase. Still need various tables, day bed, and two chairs.

IIRC most will ship the arco for free. Not worth saving $900 for a floor model....unless you don't mind the possibility of having to repair the electrical components much sooner than would otherwise be considered necessary and possibly damaging that lamp in transit.
post #7358 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

IIRC most will ship the arco for free. Not worth saving $900 for a floor model....unless you don't mind the possibility of having to repair the electrical components much sooner than would otherwise be considered necessary and possibly damaging that lamp in transit.

For a 3k MSRP lamp should I ever expect to have to repair it?

Either way, academic until I get a few more pieces. I think I've decided to have no coffee table and just do smaller tables. Might make for a more open feeling?
post #7359 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

For a 3k MSRP lamp should I ever expect to have to repair it?

Yes.
post #7360 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Yes.

Colour me confused. Isn't part of the, "Don't buy a knock off!" argument because an original will be of much higher quality and workmanship?
post #7361 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Colour me confused. Isn't part of the, "Don't buy a knock off!" argument because an original will be of much higher quality and workmanship?

1. Quality and workmanship don't lead to a maintenance-free product.
2. Floor samples may have suffered significant abuse. People tend to treat their own stuff better.
post #7362 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleeves345 View Post

So based on what I've read here alongside some perusing the internet and Wikipedia, the general focuses of various movements can be summarized as:

Modernism - austere, clean, lack of gratuitous adornment, using material to provide texture as opposed to form.  Essentially a backlash against Deco/Nouveau's opulence. Started early 20th century-ish, gained real traction post WWII, continues at various levels in contemporary design depending on designer and application.  MCM is a subset thereof.

Post-Modern - backlash against Modernism, bring back the details!  Revival of some (not all) classical design concepts, as well as introducing asymmetry, organic shapes, brutalism, etc. as a way to add depth and interest to contrast modernism's lack thereof.  Gained traction in the 80's (?), and also continues today depending on designer and application.  

Seem about right?  
What I struggle with is when I'm browsing a store or looking at pictures online (this thread for example), how can I distinguish between various subsets of Post/Modernism? Are there defining visual characteristics that can reliably distinguish Danish from American from Bauhaus?  Or is that an issue of doing my homework and learning individual designers' styles and history?

Problem is, as much as one might want to shorthand it, neither modernism nor post-modernism are aesthetic styles. For example, the goal of modernism is not to produce "austere, clean" design "lack[ing] gratuitous adornment," though such was often the effect. More accurately, modernism is the commitment to progress and improvement, unhampered by tradition and custom. It was/is a broad intellectual movement that leaked into design and architecture.

Post-modernism is indeed a backlash to modernism--but again, it is not focused on aesthetics. It is the rejection of the idea that progress and improvement can ever be validated, as it is impossible to identify or prove what is better or worse. Hence, post-modern design comes in two forms: (1) conscious commentary on the absurdity of trying to be good design (example: Philippe Starck's gun lamp) and (2) unconscious, indiscriminate melding of new and old (McMansions).

Both movements are about the theory and intent, not purely how something looks. Hence, you can't really tell whether something is modernist or post-modernist without understanding the how/why of its design. This makes the contemporary design scene particularly difficult to navigate.
post #7363 of 8379

Folks like Medwed in this thread turn me off to really getting into furniture/design.

post #7364 of 8379
Does Greenfrog put you off cars?

Just ignore it.
post #7365 of 8379
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Colour me confused. Isn't part of the, "Don't buy a knock off!" argument because an original will be of much higher quality and workmanship?

Everything wears out, and there is a good chance that a floor model has spent about 10 hours a day on, everyday for however many years it was on floor.
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