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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 490

post #7336 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

Is modernism even a thing in ME design?

I think it depends on who you ask. I'm not entirely sure what modernism means in this context so I can't say.
post #7337 of 8386
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_architecture
Quote:
Common themes of modern architecture include:

the notion that "Form follows function", a dictum originally expressed by Frank Lloyd Wright's early mentor Louis Sullivan, meaning that the result of design should derive directly from its purpose
simplicity and clarity of forms and elimination of "unnecessary detail"
materials at 90 degrees to each other
visual expression of structure (as opposed to the hiding of structural elements)
the related concept of "Truth to materials", meaning that the true nature or natural appearance of a material ought to be seen rather than concealed or altered to represent something else
use of industrially-produced materials; adoption of the machine aesthetic
particularly in International Style modernism, a visual emphasis on horizontal and vertical lines


To me at least it seems like most areas vastly skipped what in the western world is viewed as modernism, outside of a few well known examples (Kuwait National Assembly Building) and kept with the more traditional esthetics, only recently started using the design esthetics. Contemporary seems very popular though.
post #7338 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I'm seriously thinking of an Arco lamp for one of my seating areas.

Too lazy to find the eye-roll smiley.

Let's just cut to the chase:

fakearco_zpsgzrf0zv8.png~original
post #7339 of 8386
My favorite mid century style is Biedermeier.
post #7340 of 8386
I was thinking more like this:



I like the base far better and there is a tension to the arc.
post #7341 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Wikipedia has some interesting tidbits on the origin of the term:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mid-century_modern
Problem with this categorization is that it ties "modernism" to particular places and times. Intellectually, "modernism" and "post-modernism" don't reflect different eras, but divergent (and opposed) schools of thought. A contemporary designer can be either a modernist or post-modernist (or some blend of the two, I guess).

Corbusier is perhaps the archetypical modernist, yet most of his work was done prior to World War II. Jasper Morrison is a contemporary designer, but soundly in the modernist camp. Tom Dixon is contemporary and, in my view, more of a post-modernist.

Similar issues come up in discussing art. It is difficult to ascribe an overarching movement to the contemporary art scene, though each contemporary artist can be viewed as having either modernist or post-modernist leanings.

Excellent points and I'm guilty of condemning broad strokes all while painting my own. I'm giving a general categories which will help toward better definitions than 'MCM' which now is so broad in practical use that it's not much of a worthwhile category. Trying to avoid hard time frames as they tend to create a lot of exceptions.

If a practical reference could be made, it would certainly have it's failures, but may be quite useful to someone who simply wants a better understanding of the distinctions between say Frank Lloyd Wright and Ray/Charles Eames.

Bauhaus School can be somewhat rigidly defined, as we can simply note the participants.

Danish Modernism - a timeframe does become difficult here as you have early standouts like Henningsen and Koch, etc.

American Studio Craft Movement - The MET defines this as post WWII, but some of the major players have work that predates WWII.

American Modernism - This is a tricky category as it can easily paint some fairly broad strokes, but I think practically speaking we're talking about post WWII industrial design like Eames, Nelson, etc.

All of these are often grouped in with 'MCM'.
post #7342 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

I was thinking more like this:



I like the base far better and there is a tension to the arc.

Yeah, but you know the real thing is $3,000 at retail. Historically, you've chosen to spend less on something different from your original interest.
post #7343 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Excellent points and I'm guilty of condemning broad strokes all while painting my own. I'm giving a general categories which will help toward better definitions than 'MCM' which now is so broad in practical use that it's not much of a worthwhile category. Trying to avoid hard time frames as they tend to create a lot of exceptions.

If a practical reference could be made, it would certainly have it's failures, but may be quite useful to someone who simply wants a better understanding of the distinctions between say Frank Lloyd Wright and Ray/Charles Eames.

Bauhaus School can be somewhat rigidly defined, as we can simply note the participants.

Danish Modernism - a timeframe does become difficult here as you have early standouts like Henningsen and Koch, etc.

American Studio Craft Movement - The MET defines this as post WWII, but some of the major players have work that predates WWII.

American Modernism - This is a tricky category as it can easily paint some fairly broad strokes, but I think practically speaking we're talking about post WWII industrial design like Eames, Nelson, etc.

All of these are often grouped in with 'MCM'.

Why not just take MCM literally? Modernist design originating in the mid-20th century. It may or may not overlap with any number of other distinctions.
post #7344 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Yeah, but you know the real thing is $3,000 at retail. Historically, you've chosen to spend less on something different from your original interest.

True on some items, not true on others and there's also matter of degree. Those loungers I bought, at 1.4k each, are solidly built and of good materials, and I don't think comparing that purchase to an $80 lamp of obvious dubious quality is equivalent. The Arco also seems to offer increased function as it's the arch that is important to me here due to the room dynamics. Also, I've found them for 2.1k
post #7345 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

True on some items, not true on others and there's also matter of degree. Those loungers I bought, at 1.4k each, are solidly built and of good materials, and I don't think comparing that purchase to an $80 lamp of obvious dubious quality is equivalent. The Arco also seems to offer increased function as it's the arch that is important to me here due to the room dynamics. Also, I've found them for 2.1k

Is the $2,100 price including discount or used or not for an authentic lamp?
post #7346 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Off the cuff;

Bauhaus - architects and designers of the Bauhaus school.

American modernism - generally post WWII

Danish Modernism - also generally post WWII, but some significant designers started In the early 20th century.

Post Modernism - thus area in my wheelhouse, so to speak, but it's usually late 20th century and material use in an atypical fashion

And probably a few more that I'm forgetting.

Bauhaus - Design Within Reach

American modernism - Aaron's Rent to Own

Danish Modernism - Ikea

Post Modernism - Target


Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Digging these lamps.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)








table-lamp-two_angle2-edit.jpg

I think those are pretty annoying on multiple levels. First, they are a twee "adaptation" of a very old idea. Second, they look very nice just sitting there but are comically non-functional. Who wants to look at a bare bulb? The double reflector one might, possibly, be made to work if you are standing in just the right place, but that is hardly a recommendation. These lamps are a great example of form following function, jumping it in a dark alley and beating it to death.
post #7347 of 8386
post #7348 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by mafoofan View Post

Is the $2,100 price including discount or used or not for an authentic lamp?

Floor model, authentic. If I buy a floor model does this disallow me from the Cool Kids club?
post #7349 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

Floor model, authentic. If I buy a floor model does this disallow me from the Cool Kids club?

You could get new non-display model from Flos for $2500 with a single phone call.
post #7350 of 8386
If anything, it adds street cred. You got one over on the man, man.

(I also like those, regardless of how cliche they might be. Great shape and function, and it's hard to beat a big ol' slab of mountain for gravitas.)
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