or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 471

post #7051 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Since I'm a cheesy Japan-Ophile I bought some classical Ukiyo-e. Recently I have completed framing one of them.

49C16BC3-9FDC-45FA-8C4B-3B44945A2993_zpscudjywlk.jpg

F9422378-16FF-4B94-A630-DC2311CC44D7_zpsyxc8l4km.jpg

 

Would love to see a quick sketch of how you put the front frame in, very much enjoying the small chamfer between all the joints.

post #7052 of 8386
I appreciate the warm reception.

The inner frame fits into a groove, the groove is hidden in the dovetail work;





Then here is the back;



The top is fixed and the bottom is removable, so the work can slip in. The bottom is set 1/4" proud of the frame so that the reveal on the wall due to the wall cleat is equal all around.

I used a wall cleat in this case to avoid building some sort of crossmember.
post #7053 of 8386

That frame really is awesome. How many hours went into it? 

post #7054 of 8386
Thank you! Tough to say since I'm building two and overlapping the builds to minimize duplicate process. All told probably about 6-8 hours.
post #7055 of 8386

@SkinnyGoomba You need to step up your documentation game. :)

 

post #7056 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Then here is the back;



The top is fixed and the bottom is removable, so the work can slip in. The bottom is set 1/4" proud of the frame so that the reveal on the wall due to the wall cleat is equal all around.

I used a wall cleat in this case to avoid building some sort of crossmember.

Good heavens, man! Is that a particle board backing?!?
post #7057 of 8386
Hah, god no, that is cork backed foam board with a white acid free face.

Pretty much any prints must be backed by something acid free, and I prefer white because it won't darken the imagine.
Edited by SkinnyGoomba - 11/4/15 at 9:02pm
post #7058 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Hah, god no, that is cork backed foam board with a white acid free face.

And a great relief that is to hear.
Quote:
Pretty much any prints must be backed by something acid free, and I prefer white because it won't darken the imagine.

Yes, exactly.

What kind of glass did you use? I have never been able to decide whether museum glass provides enough additional damage protection to make it worth the extra expense.
post #7059 of 8386
I used UV protectant glass, but not museum glass. Museum glass is nicer for the glare resistance but this room doesnt have many lights that will cause glare.

I've framed some work for a friend and used museum plexi, it's really nice stuff.
post #7060 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post

And a great relief that is to hear.
Yes, exactly.

What kind of glass did you use? I have never been able to decide whether museum glass provides enough additional damage protection to make it worth the extra expense.

Doesn't change much in my experience unless it is a really sunny area. Note that some museums manage to fuck up museum glass protected paintings (this is a thing, yeah on paintings :'() by directing so much light at it that the whole thing glares (the renovated Paris Picasso museum made sure it is impossible to see the most famous paintings).
post #7061 of 8386
Yeah for most homes I wouldn't think museum glass makes much of a difference in the long term preservation of the art. It also can make viewing the art not as enjoyable.
post #7062 of 8386
Also SkinnyGoooomba making his own frames is next level hobby dedication. icon_gu_b_slayer[1].gif
post #7063 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

Yeah for most homes I wouldn't think museum glass makes much of a difference in the long term preservation of the art. It also can make viewing the art not as enjoyable.

Who cares about the long-term preservation of art? This is SF where we worry about the hyphen in "anal retentive." I'm sure we could go on for pages about the advantages and disadvantages of various kinds of framing materials. We went on for 20 pages about Matt's toilet paper holder.

But you are probably right. Regular window glass blocks about 2/3 of UV light. Even if you frame with just regular glass you are blocking about 90% of the incoming UV.

But the museum glass thing gets really fiddly. You get to obsess about things like Krochman functions and whether the improved viewing angles from anti-reflective coatings are worth the possible increased damage from additional UVA transmission.

I feel this is just the sort of thing that could add meaning to SG's life, if only his homeowner's association would allow him to build small float glass bath in his back yard.
post #7064 of 8386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bounder View Post


I feel this is just the sort of thing that could add meaning to SG's life, if only his homeowner's association would allow him to build small float glass bath in his back yard.

Well, the energy costs alone would make this a big timer thing only.. I wonder who will be the first:slayer:
post #7065 of 8386
Hah, I love how you guys think. They're already nixed my proposed Noguchi style giant basalt stone fountain and also proposed outdoor metal forge.....I'm thinking this will be a tough sell.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata