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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 193

post #2881 of 4068
I'll do my best to explain each area of this project. Keep in mind, this is my opinion.

Lumber selection:

When plain sawn lumber is cut using a bandsaw style mill they are cutting slices off of a log. The ideal cuts are the two cuts that are immediately opposite the centerline of the log and in this case the ideal log would be one where the trunk makes it's first branch, this is called the crotch and that is the ideal crotch (Ed knows about this, but in a different context tongue.gif). The reason for this is that the flitches that are immediately opposite the centerline off the log are the least likely to develop heavy cupping (bending across the width), they will also yield the two most similar mirror images of one another.

All of this is relevant to slab tables, I promise.

Ideal lumber for the base, in my opinion, is 1/4 sawn if you can find it. Outside of that you would want plain sawn lumber with very straight grain.
Edited by SkinnyGoomba - 10/18/13 at 11:09am
post #2882 of 4068
Lacquer on wood box by Kuroda Tatsuaki. I've been enamored by it and wanted to share.

post #2883 of 4068
Table top design:

This is a simple, but very exciting part of this process. You goal is to create a short rectangle or square in the abstract. You would bookmatch starting at the centerline of the table (across the width) and finish cut the truck and branches in a angular cut starting from center. Properly designed slab tables will be bookmatched in sequence from center out using boards that start from the flitchline in sequence on either side of the centerline of the table. Hopefully that makes sense, it's a lot to attempt to explain but should be almost intuitive once you have some insight into the process.

You determine the length that you need, but the width will be dictated by the lumber you end up using.

Some people build a lot of butterfly joints into their design at this point, but I prefer to see them only where they are actually needed, which is any point where a big split needs to be stopped from growing. For butterflies I like to chose an exotic wood, but if you find that offensive you can use a lightly contrasting wood or the same species. Straight grained wood is preferential for the butterflies.

Nakashima's work often shows where he has joined the two main flitches together at the centerline of the tabletop with butterflies and a slight gap between the boards. This is likely above your skill level at this point, so I would not attempt it. This is one of the areas where his work sets him apart as the master of this style.
post #2884 of 4068
I'm looking to get a floor lamp between $300-1,000. What are my options? I might use near my sofa or in my bedroom. Any suggestions in terms of brands etc. I don't mind used or new.

I saw an SLR lamp some time ago. I should have bought that when I saw it. Haven't been able to source since.
post #2885 of 4068
Noob question:

Why do I need bookend matched wood? Looking at some examples, I see what appears to be just one piece of wood for the top. Eg the slab coffee table here: http://www.nakashimawoodworker.com/furniture/4/50
post #2886 of 4068
Quote:
Originally Posted by poissa View Post

I'm looking to get a floor lamp between $300-1,000. What are my options? I might use near my sofa or in my bedroom. Any suggestions in terms of brands etc. I don't mind used or new.

I saw an SLR lamp some time ago. I should have bought that when I saw it. Haven't been able to source since.

I love our BL3 floor lamp. We have it in full chrome. A timeless classic, as they say.
post #2887 of 4068
Quote:
Originally Posted by brokencycle View Post

Noob question:

Why do I need bookend matched wood? Looking at some examples, I see what appears to be just one piece of wood for the top. Eg the slab coffee table here: http://www.nakashimawoodworker.com/furniture/4/50

You don't, but it would be much more typical to put a table like that in front a long sofa. In front of a sectional, something square or round makes more sense, IMO. Best case scenario would be to find a nice short, but wide flitch from the crotch area, I didnt point to that originally because they are more rare.

In any case, I don't want to bombard you with information, the best part about slab tables is that the inspiration comes from the wood. The slab will tell you what it can be.
Edited by SkinnyGoomba - 10/18/13 at 9:28am
post #2888 of 4068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post


Fellas what is this thing called and who makes it? Anyone tried ?

It's an OTTO stovetop espresso maker - more info here.

A friend of mine has one. They're pretty expensive, and take a while to make a coffee, but he says that it tastes great. I know that Graeme Wong (aka Phat Guido of Most Exerent) was using one for a while - I don't know if he still uses it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by furo View Post


and pale blue:

Quote:
Originally Posted by apropos View Post

Agreed, very different from the vast majority of "MCM" dreck floating about.

I don't know if it applies to the rest of the world, but Down Under it's pretty incredible the amount of crappy 60s furniture that gets labelled with some/all of the following tags - "Modern/Modernist", "Danish", "Scandinavian", "Mid Century".

And then there is the target audience - the trendy latte sipping tattooed 20/30-somethings with facial hair and 50s hairstyles who snap them up to put in their rented apartments, and then spray paint the drawers in solid colours because they saw it on a blog on the internetz.

Worse still are the more cashed up 30-somethings who buy real Federation pieces and paint it flat dove gray or fluorescent colours to go with their mirrored side tables and ghost chairs.

Sometimes,


My parents had a matched set of very, very similar chairs and a two-seater couch when I was growing up. It was upholstered in an electric-blue fabric with a visible weave that was a bit scratchy and undoubtedly made at least partly of artificial fibres, which was par for the course when the furniture was made!

They gave them to charity when I was in my teens, as that sort of MCM furniture was very much out of style at that time.

I was looking through an antique furniture market a few years back and they had a set of two very, very similar chairs that had been re-upholstered in new fabric, priced at $795 each!!!

I didn't dare tell my mother as I think that she would have had a heart attack.
post #2889 of 4068
Quote:
Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post

They gave them to charity when I was in my teens, as that sort of MCM furniture was very much out of style at that time.

I was looking through an antique furniture market a few years back and they had a set of two very, very similar chairs that had been re-upholstered in new fabric, priced at $795 each!!!

I didn't dare tell my mother as I think that she would have had a heart attack.

A friend of my mother threw a Wegner Teddy bear chair in the trash years ago, when I told her there's a shop down the street offering $4.500 no matter the condition, her face went white.
post #2890 of 4068
Lol. I would imagine some antique hunter picked that thing up minutes after she put it out. Danish modern seems to be an acquired taste in my area, the people who own it seem to know what they have and the people who don't seem to have almost zero interest in it.
post #2891 of 4068
Rick Owens turns his hand from streetwear to furniture design:

http://www.gq.com.au/life/design/galleries/+new+furniture+from+rick+owens,27001?pos=0#top

I'm sure that one of those stools would look good in the corner of Foo's loungeroom...
post #2892 of 4068
Question: will these teak chairs pair well with a coffee and end table of natural walnut? Below is the actual chairs and maker of the walnut tables we've already ordered.

59e5ee2b_Ole_Wchairs.jpeg

with...

post #2893 of 4068
I mix woods all the time, I have walnut, Honduras rosewood, gaboon and Macassar ebony, bubinga, white oak, maple and teak all in the same room.
post #2894 of 4068
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I mix woods all the time, I have walnut, Honduras rosewood, gaboon and Macassar ebony, bubinga, white oak, maple and teak all in the same room.

Interesting. Do you have a photo of the room?
post #2895 of 4068
Matching woods in a room feels a bit like matching a tie to a pocket square.
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