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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 185

post #2761 of 4034
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

It depends very much on the design. Obviously most table leg attachments have to consider the forces that will be put on them, the intended use and the design along with the materials used for the tabletop. A large solid wood tabletop had a lot of possibility for wood movement, where a tabletop made of MDF or Plywood with a veneer will move an inconsequential amount.

As a general guide I like table skirts to be reinforced from the inside with a block of wood running the full length of the skirt. Removable legs should have guide pin and be attached with bolts (not screws).

Obviously the various styles of table bases and legs all have their own circumstantial needs that are required in order to survive for a long period of time.

So in the picture I linked above, you'd want the wooden block to run along adjacent to each of the skirts?
post #2762 of 4034
That's a pretty typical economy table skirt, so I expect there is something else wrong with it if the legs are capable of moving. Either the skirt is loose, it doesn't have pins or mortises to support the legs, or it has worn in a way which allows the bolts to bottom before the setup becomes fully tight.
post #2763 of 4034
i believe the issue may be the 'wedge' that the leg is housed in between the two adjoining skirts - the angle of the wegde isn't a perfect slot. Almost positive the construction is mortise and tenon though - i'll post a few pics in a couple hours
post #2764 of 4034
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

That's a pretty typical economy table skirt, so I expect there is something else wrong with it if the legs are capable of moving. Either the skirt is loose, it doesn't have pins or mortises to support the legs, or it has worn in a way which allows the bolts to bottom before the setup becomes fully tight.

Do you do woodworking?! Does anyone else here?

I recently became inspired by woodworking after I had an I idea I wanted to build a table. Now, I look at furniture and think, "Oh, I can build that." haha.
I've always liked "design" but now I am paying attention to the details and construction more.

I just ordered a Kreg Jig (shog[1].gif) to explore my interest but I would love to attempt making different joints by hand one day.
post #2765 of 4034
I do on a hobbyist basis. I think you are better off using a dowelmax, you can accomplish a lot with blind dowels and they can make a joint comparable in strength to mortise and tenons.

After that you'll want to explore some other basic joinery such as rabbets, dados and through dowels, and later explore more complicated joinery such as dovetails and mortise and tenons.
post #2766 of 4034
Okay here's the end table:











post #2767 of 4034

Any experience with these guys? http://www.intirium.com/

 

lefty

post #2768 of 4034
If you like the table, I would just leave it alone. But you cant really expect rock solid performance from a leg being trapped between the skirt and attached by one screw. The only time I've seen those skirts used successfully and without wobble is when the marker uses a pair of studs and washer face bolts on each leg. And I would not attempt to modify it.
post #2769 of 4034
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I do on a hobbyist basis. I think you are better off using a dowelmax, you can accomplish a lot with blind dowels and they can make a joint comparable in strength to mortise and tenons.

After that you'll want to explore some other basic joinery such as rabbets, dados and through dowels, and later explore more complicated joinery such as dovetails and mortise and tenons.

Wow, that looks really cool and makes a really clean joint, I completely overlooked other methods of quick joinery. Do you have one?
I'll see what I can do with the pocket jig for now before I go dropping any more money on gadgets.

I am looking to buy a table saw and router next. Any recommendations?
post #2770 of 4034
Quote:
Originally Posted by lefty View Post

Any experience with these guys? http://www.intirium.com/

lefty

Nope, but I have had a positive experience with furniture manufactured by Poltrona Frau and B&B Italia.
post #2771 of 4034
Quote:
Originally Posted by poorman View Post

Wow, that looks really cool and makes a really clean joint, I completely overlooked other methods of quick joinery.
I'll see what I can do with the pocket jig for now before I go dropping any more money on gadgets.

I am looking to buy a table saw and router next. Any recommendations?

If you dont have much experience you should consider taking some courses at a local college. It will be invaluable as you proceed. You'll also have a much better understanding of what you would want from your tools.

I know what I want from a TS and router because of the projects that I normally build.
post #2772 of 4034
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

If you like the table, I would just leave it alone. But you cant really expect rock solid performance from a leg being trapped between the skirt and attached by one screw. The only time I've seen those skirts used successfully and without wobble is when the marker uses a pair of studs and washer face bolts on each leg. And I would not attempt to modify it.

Yeah I looked it over again today and I'm satisfied with its construction for what it was made for - to hold a single accent lamp and a few books now and then. On the other hand, the end table this is replacing actually did use bolts and washers and it was wobbly as hell. The angles and fit of the corners wasn't nearly as clean as with the piece I just bought.
post #2773 of 4034
Quote:
Originally Posted by furo View Post

Okay here's the end table: Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)











It looks to me like the difference between your actual table and the one you posted as a sample is what the leg is being pulled against.

In your sample table, the leg is being pulled from its corner. So when you tighten the bolt, the force is distributed across two perpendicular sides of the leg, thus stabilizing it in two directions. As long as the bolt is kept tight and the things that it is pulled against are sturdy, the leg should be fairly stable.

In your actual table however, the legs are rotated 45 degrees. Now the screw (which can't pull as hard as a bolt) is only pulling the leg against a single side and stabilizing it in one dimension. The side pieces are only holding the leg in place as far as whatever meager amount of "squeeze" they might have from being a little closer together (i.e. they don't actually have the force of a screw/bolt pulling them against the leg). Also, since the leg is only attached with a single screw, it is free to rotate as much as the two side pieces will allow it (which will only get worse with time).

Your table will probably be fine as an end table, but I don't see what you could do to eliminate the wobble....sending a second (or third) screw through it might help since it would get rid of some of the rotation that can occur with a single pivot point.
post #2774 of 4034
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

It looks to me like the difference between your actual table and the one you posted as a sample is what the leg is being pulled against.

In your sample table, the leg is being pulled from its corner. So when you tighten the bolt, the force is distributed across two perpendicular sides of the leg, thus stabilizing it in two directions. As long as the bolt is kept tight and the things that it is pulled against are sturdy, the leg should be fairly stable.

In your actual table however, the legs are rotated 45 degrees. Now the screw (which can't pull as hard as a bolt) is only pulling the leg against a single side and stabilizing it in one dimension. The side pieces are only holding the leg in place as far as whatever meager amount of "squeeze" they might have from being a little closer together (i.e. they don't actually have the force of a screw/bolt pulling them against the leg). Also, since the leg is only attached with a single screw, it is free to rotate as much as the two side pieces will allow it (which will only get worse with time).

Your table will probably be fine as an end table, but I don't see what you could do to eliminate the wobble....sending a second (or third) screw through it might help since it would get rid of some of the rotation that can occur with a single pivot point.

Well, to be fair, the table doesn't wobble. When I grasp a single leg and try to "force" it one way or another there is a very slight amount of "wiggle room." But overall this is miles above the sturdiness seen in my old end table that this replaced.
post #2775 of 4034
What do you guys think of this sofa? Haven't experimented with an "armless" sofa before but I really like the idea... would it get annoying over time?

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