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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 119

post #1771 of 3474
I prefer the Eames Aluminum group, but if you really need an 'office' chair, I'd take the Arron over the liberty.
post #1772 of 3474
It really depends on your needs and what you are looking to get out of the chair. When it comes to something that I need to sit in for so long during the day, I put overall comfort and support as my priorities. It's understandable that some don't have the same needs.
post #1773 of 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

Recently I tried out the Embody from Herman Miller and fell in love with it. Easily the most comfortable and best supporting office chair I have ever sat in. The looks may prove divisive to many, but I think the design is fine. It's a little on the pricey end, but if you can swing it I would give one of them a shot.

One day I'll upgrade to the Embody unless something better comes along.

I haven't sat in this for long periods of time, but I have tried it out (when looking at commercial furniture for a possible office re-do) and liked it. It doesn't get in the way of your arms which is nice.
If we were going to replace our Aerons, it would be my preference to try out the Embody.

What I don't get is why our junior staff all get shitty chairs. They aren't absolute cheapies (no $50 staples special) but I don't like them at all. It looked like they have plans to replace them all, but again the options are not really top-notch.

An Aeron only costs a few hundred bucks more per employee (especially when you are buying 100+) and they should be covered by HM's awesome warranty for 12 full years. Even after 12 years, they should still be going strong. The cheaper chairs might save you at most an hour's worth of billing from an employee, but they will probably need replacement faster. Add in the fact that the younger employees are spending their entire lives at the computer. The older people sitting in the Aerons spent the first 30 years of their life *not* using computers...what's going to happen to all these kids who have grown up in front of one and are still sitting in crappy chairs?
post #1774 of 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

I haven't sat in this for long periods of time, but I have tried it out (when looking at commercial furniture for a possible office re-do) and liked it. It doesn't get in the way of your arms which is nice.
If we were going to replace our Aerons, it would be my preference to try out the Embody.

What I don't get is why our junior staff all get shitty chairs. They aren't absolute cheapies (no $50 staples special) but I don't like them at all. It looked like they have plans to replace them all, but again the options are not really top-notch.

An Aeron only costs a few hundred bucks more per employee (especially when you are buying 100+) and they should be covered by HM's awesome warranty for 12 full years. Even after 12 years, they should still be going strong. The cheaper chairs might save you at most an hour's worth of billing from an employee, but they will probably need replacement faster. Add in the fact that the younger employees are spending their entire lives at the computer. The older people sitting in the Aerons spent the first 30 years of their life *not* using computers...what's going to happen to all these kids who have grown up in front of one and are still sitting in crappy chairs?

I was thinking about a Leap because I would love a head-rest for when I sit back and close my eyes to think (i.e. nap)...

Junior productivity is never taken seriously. Better chairs, larger monitors, all would be helpful...
post #1775 of 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by akatsuki View Post

Junior productivity is never taken seriously. Better chairs, larger monitors, all would be helpful...

We've managed to give them all big monitors (plus the the laptop screen for a second display) and docking bays with real keyboards and mice...heck, when I was down there, they were fine ordering a specific keyboard I requested.

Sure, the desks and cubicles are ancient and drab, but that stuff was built to last so it is all still good. The floor they are on is pretty ghetto (to the point where there are sections of carpet duct taped back in place) but some of them get pretty baller lake views if they are in a room with windows. The crap chairs just seem out of place, especially with the mounting journalist coverage of the importance of a good chair.
post #1776 of 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post


I hate those pillars and I can't figure out, why they can't build building without them.

 

What will hold up the ceiling/floor?

post #1777 of 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jr Mouse View Post

I have sat in the Aeron several times before and never been that impressed. Just not my thing, but the support and overall comfort always felt lacking.

Recently I tried out the Embody from Herman Miller and fell in love with it. Easily the most comfortable and best supporting office chair I have ever sat in. The looks may prove divisive to many, but I think the design is fine. It's a little on the pricey end, but if you can swing it I would give one of them a shot.

Right now I am actually using a Aeron knock off that my office provided me. The lumbar support is horrid, but I have made up for this by adding one of these. It has done wonders for me, even if It's not a pretty arrangement. The added support was desperately needed for the chair since I have been working from home. I'd recommend one of them to anyone who can't afford a high end office chair, but has been feeling a lot of back and shoulder pain. At $80, it's a steal.

One day I'll upgrade to the Embody unless something better comes along.

Steelcase Gesture

http://www.steelcase.com/en/products/category/seating/task/gesture/pages/overview.aspx

post #1778 of 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by UnnamedPlayer View Post

What will hold up the ceiling/floor?

The walls.....

My grandparents lived in an apartment with a concrete pillar 60cm from the outer wall, such a waste of space you can't put anything in the gap and you can't get through it either.
post #1779 of 3474
It does leave you wondering.
post #1780 of 3474
Meh. I am no architectural expert, but I think a great many buildings do rely on similar pillars for strength and support. I'm sure it's possible to build without them, but probably also more expensive. In the old days, such pillars would have been hidden behind bulkheads or in hallways or other lost space. But with the emergence of loft- and industrial-design chic, builders got a great double-dip of good fortune. Such pillars became desirable design elements, and in not needing to bulkhead around them or bury them at the ends of hallways, they could also advertise more square footage. Win-win.
post #1781 of 3474
Most lofts are so huge that losing a bit of space to a pillar is not a big deal, but the apartment in question would certainly benefit from not having it.
post #1782 of 3474
Quote:


Could be promising and doesn't look bad at all.
post #1783 of 3474
If you make the facade a bearing wall rather than a curtain wall, you're going to lose at least 6" of space around the perimeter to accommodate structural walls' thickness which adds up to a hefty chunk of square footage, You're also going to lose a considerable amount of natural light from the lost glazing. If you move the columns away from the facade, you have to increase their diameter a great deal to handle the cantilever, which will also start to affect usage of the floor space. If you increase the number of interior columns, you can reduce the thickness of the floor slab to a flat plane by eliminating joists, which saves considerable money in a taller building. The only way to really get lots of natural light with no columns in a residential space is to make ceilings extremely large to account for a bearing wall, or to make the residence thin and elongated along the perimeter, neither of which are economical for the developer. Therefore, columns placed near the facade.
post #1784 of 3474
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

If you make the facade a bearing wall rather than a curtain wall, you're going to lose at least 6" of space around the perimeter to accommodate structural walls' thickness which adds up to a hefty chunk of square footage, You're also going to lose a considerable amount of natural light. If you move the columns away from the facade, you have to increase their diameter a great deal to handle the cantilever, which will also start to affect usage of the floor space. If you increase the number of interior columns, you can reduce the thickness of the floor slabs, which saves considerable money in a taller building. The only way to really get lots of natural light with no columns in a residential space is to make ceilings extremely large to account for a bearing wall, or to make the residence thin and elongated along the perimeter, neither of which are economical for the developer. Therefore, columns placed near the facade.

Around here you pay sq. footage from the outside of the exterior walls, so financially it wouldn't make any difference and making an apartment that is nice to live in and well designed, will help pull up the price and cover the cost.

Most places I see with the column/pillar solution are cheaply done and the apartment I mentioned they had fucked up the engineering (they forgot to put drains for rain water in the balconies etc.).


Lofts are old industrial spaces and are designed/engineered for heavy manufacturing equipment etc., the columns/pillars are therefor needed, in a 80 sqm 2 bedroom apartment, not so much.
post #1785 of 3474
No.
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