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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 12

post #166 of 3996
Quote:
Originally Posted by ms244
I don't suppose you have some idea of the size of that thing?

Don't know the dimensions sorry.
There is a two-arm version available at Jousse Entreprise in Paris.


http://www.jousse-entreprise.com/arc...php?id_page=40
post #167 of 3996
Where do you get the round thingies?

Also, I realized that I couldn't get such a thing into this apartment, short of forklifting it through a window.

There should also be some threaded holes on the ends for D-rings.
post #168 of 3996
Quote:
Originally Posted by GQgeek View Post
That thing is very slick. I'd definitely buy a well-made replica, but 421k is a little much for something you'll probably end up fucking on.

Auction prices are not necessarily a clear indication of the true market value of an object. People seem to regularly go nuts at auctions; the price can quickly be pushed stratospherically beyond the reserve when two determined bidders decide to lock horns over a desired item.
post #169 of 3996
Jean Nouvel









(door handle)

post #170 of 3996
Lamps

post #171 of 3996
Quote:
Auction prices are not necessarily a clear indication of the true market value of an object. People seem to regularly go nuts at auctions; the price can quickly be pushed stratospherically beyond the reserve when two determined bidders decide to lock horns over a desired item.

Auctions can be very fickle, but overall I find them one of the best indicators of true "market value", because they represent actual prices paid...especially when talking about important pieces, which is where they generally change hands. I find markets like 1stdibs to be overly inflated in asking prices, and you never know what people really pay for them.

I think the trick is avoid what the market has manipulated into what is "hot" at the moment, which creates a temporary inflated market for such items....which eventually dies down, and is replaced by other "must have" names & items.
post #172 of 3996
Quote:
Originally Posted by freshcutgrass View Post
I think the trick is avoid what the market has manipulated into what is "hot" at the moment, which creates a temporary inflated market for such items....which eventually dies down, and is replaced by other "must have" names & items.
Very good advice ...essentially, this is what I was referring to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by freshcutgrass
Auctions can be very fickle, but overall I find them one of the best indicators of true "market value", because they represent actual prices paid...especially when talking about important pieces, which is where they generally change hands.
I have seen various examples of auctions achieving prices for items that can be bought new for less ...but your point is valid in most cases.
post #173 of 3996
Quote:
I have seen various examples of auctions achieving prices for items that can be bought new for less

I'm not 100% sure what you are referring to, but vintage/early production of items still in production or re-issued will generally carry a premium with collectors...sometimes a large one.
post #174 of 3996
^ sure.

Actually that is an interesting thing ...I can appreciate the preference for originals over re-issued items, but with furniture that has been in continuous production for decades, I struggle to see any real value added just because it is older.
post #175 of 3996
well in some cases it is because the old stuff becomes collectors items. As an example, the PK22 by Poul Kjaerholm is now produced by Frits Hansen whereas E. Kold Christensen originally produced the chair. Those will always reach a higher price on auctions, because of the "originality" and the rareness. Beside this, older furniture seems to be more beautiful because of the patina they will get over time and use. A new oak table looks rather boring compared to the warm cognac color a 50 yer old table have. The PK22 produced by E. Kold Christensen By fritz Hansen
post #176 of 3996
Quote:
I can appreciate the preference for originals over re-issued items, but with furniture that has been in continuous production for decades, I struggle to see any real value added just because it is older.
Yea...re-issues is easy (the entire reason they are re-issued is because the out-of-production units have become too valuable)...and I agree continuous production items are a lot more difficult to justify, especially if it hasn't changed in composition, manufacturer or design/build a slight bit. Most of the items that fall within this category aren't really big ticket items for collectors anyway. That said, you will still find things like early production Platner tables & Eames loungers sell at auction for prices higher than what you can buy it new for at your local Knoll or Herman Miller retailer. Partly due to slight changes in design/materials and partly due to age-patina and also partly due to rarity at the time. The earlier something is in its production span, the more desirable it seems to be. Sometimes they may have been owned by famous people...or someone will pay more money for a production Barcelona chair from the Seagram Building than they would for any other "used" Barcelona chair. The ultimate expression of this, is of course pre-production prototypes, which even though they are generally inferior in build quality to production units, fetch outrageous prices (documentation is important here).
post #177 of 3996
Quote:
Originally Posted by JacobJacob View Post

As an example, the PK22 by Poul Kjaerholm is now produced by Frits Hansen whereas E. Kold Christensen originally produced the chair. Those will always reach a higher price on auctions, because of the "originality" and the rareness. Beside this, older furniture seems to be more beautiful because of the patina they will get over time and use. A new oak table looks rather boring compared to the warm cognac color a 50 yer old table have.

I really like that chiar ....but I absolutely love the PK25.

Your point about patina is valid I guess ...even if it is a personal taste thing -- but I see irony in the fact that these furniture designs were intended to embody a kind of idealized formal Modernism -- beyond fashion and time -- they were intended to be 'timeless'. A patina almost betrays this intention; it's at odds with the original context of the object. However, we do tend to view these Modern designs from a different context today (a post-modern context if you like).
post #178 of 3996
Edited Edited - See Below!
post #179 of 3996
Quote:
Originally Posted by hypersonic View Post
I really like that chiar ....but I absolutely love the PK25. but I see irony in the fact that these furniture designs were intended to embody a kind of idealized formal Modernism -- beyond fashion and time -- they were intended to be 'timeless'. A patina almost betrays this intention; it's at odds with the original context of the object.
That is actuallya good and valid point and I haven't thought it before now. - Thanx for ruin my love for vintage furniture's, you bastard
post #180 of 3996
Quote:
A patina almost betrays this intention; it's at odds with the original context of the object.

On the contrary, I think these items were deigned to last a very long time, and materials were consciously chosen that will age well...even improve with time & wear.
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