or Connect
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 96

post #1426 of 4091
So no one is going to buy that wine key and give us a review? confused.gif
post #1427 of 4091
Not sure why everyone is pissing on it, I think it's cool. The guy seems genuinely interested in producing a good product. I hate the name, would rather see the designers name.
post #1428 of 4091
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Not sure why everyone is pissing on it, I think it's cool. The guy seems genuinely interested in producing a good product. I hate the name, would rather see the designers name.

Because it's about wine is probably part of the reason.
post #1429 of 4091
Well, you don't need a corkscrew to open cognac.
post #1430 of 4091
Well, as I said, unlike the $2 opener, that one actually belongs in this thread.

It does seem a little absurdly priced though. He's already got the tooling and jigs, you could assembly line those pretty fast with a few interns.
Price them at a still ridiculous (for a corkscrew), but affordable, $100 and you could sell a lot more of them.
post #1431 of 4091
Can someone recommend decently priced yet quality chesterfield sofas? also pictures of them being incorporated into modern spaces would be cool
post #1432 of 4091
Can't decide on a lamp for my formal living room, I'm in between:





I have an AJ in one room, love the light it puts off, might just do another in black rather than blue like i have.



I have a couple danish easy chairs in their, cream leather sofa and a noguchi table along with a shaker style side table I made in ebony and honduras rosewood. The lamp has been a point of contention.
post #1433 of 4091
For the Cappellini fans.

post #1434 of 4091
Have you posted any photos of your place besides the one with the couch and chair? It seems like you're just hoarding all this notable furniture into a generic yellow room to make a showroom. Does it actually complement whatever architectural characteristics are there? Or does it allow you to use the space in any particular manner? It doesn't feel like there's a very authentic method to all these indulgences
post #1435 of 4091
Quote:
Originally Posted by otc View Post

Well, as I said, unlike the $2 opener, that one actually belongs in this thread.
It does seem a little absurdly priced though. He's already got the tooling and jigs, you could assembly line those pretty fast with a few interns.
Price them at a still ridiculous (for a corkscrew), but affordable, $100 and you could sell a lot more of them.

Agree with all this. I'd probably drop a c-note on this but not half a k. Still, it looks like a nice piece and I'd like to try one out. The pivot system should make breaking a cork hard. I use an $8 one with a dual pivot that is great.

http://www.amazon.com/Oenophilia-900650-Coutale-Sommeliers-Corkscrew/dp/B000VB280S/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1355621263&sr=8-12&keywords=wine+key
post #1436 of 4091
Quote:
Originally Posted by StephenHero View Post

Have you posted any photos of your place besides the one with the couch and chair? It seems like you're just hoarding all this notable furniture into a generic yellow room to make a showroom. Does it actually complement whatever architectural characteristics are there? Or does it allow you to use the space in any particular manner? It doesn't feel like there's a very authentic method to all these indulgences

I appreciate that you chimed in, since I do admire your taste in interior spaces. However, i'm Not really sure what an authentic method is, I use it as a parlor. I doubt it will remain yellow, and the generic trimmings will likely change as well. Unfortunately I just cannot do everything at once, and don't quite want to either, since I enjoy a process.

I believe I have posted a few other rooms and an outdoor space.
post #1437 of 4091
The yellow paint was one of the main concerns, hence why I asked for more photos, because the furniture I've seen doesn't go with it in my opinion. That yellow color in the flat or eggshell finish has strong historic connotations in a way that would be best complimented with the use of darker, tung-oiled wood accents in the furniture. The refined finish of stainless steel Bauhaus furniture likely calls for a more homogeneous white interior, particularly one with satin trim and a quality skim coat. The proportions of that room also don't seem very conducive to the arrangement of the furniture. Bauhaus furniture usually works best when it is free-standing away from the walls in a very formal configuration, because it uses the space to accentuates the delicacy of their lines and lightness. Shoving that chair and side table too close to the walls creates some cluttered visuals that diminishes the quality of their shape. I would also get rid of the Venetian blinds, which are too rustic and heavy-handed with that furniture, and use some lightweight drapes that break up its rigidity better.

Here are some photos with that are somewhat relevant .





















post #1438 of 4091
You realize I did ask for recommendations on drapes about two pages ago I hope, lol. I think we are on the same page and that is in line with the changes I would like to make. The furniture is actually floated away from the walls, but I disagree that it needs to always be dedicated to a huge room where it can be placed in an area with 5' around it on every side.
post #1439 of 4091
You've talked a lot about honoring the integrity of the furniture production and its design, so you can't forget that its design is inseparable from the architectural language that preceded it. The furniture itself was designed specifically for horizontally open and bright space, which fits in with Bauhaus concepts of open plans, non-load-bearing facades, and spatial transparency that complement the lightness of the steel for decorative effect. The room you're using the furniture in is very vertically oriented near the windows and quite intimate, which has a tendency to cramp the furniture when it's oriented along the wall. The furniture really does need the effort of every ounce of space available, and you'll notice that Le Corbusier, Mies, Kahn, Johnson, etc. often use wood furniture/accent walls, plush textiles and color in their most intimately-scaled domestic spaces because that scale requires a much more earthly and softer palette of material qualities than steel can effectively provide in a room without significant light. Much of the modernist furniture was never intended to be used indiscriminately in private residences, hence why it is generally found historically inside architecture like office lobbies where the space can accommodate its formal rigor. In homes, the modernist architects more often made custom furniture.

Bauhaus furniture really is very demanding in placement, just like how it requires very specific posture and activities to sit in it and you have to really bend to its will in more ways than you'd like to get the most out of it. I wouldn't try to use it in my narrow row house, FWIW. I'm not saying it can't be done, but it's just really difficult to work with, because it is extremely refined and pompous.









Edited by StephenHero - 12/15/12 at 11:56pm
post #1440 of 4091
I would go a couple tones darker, than straight white or grey with white trim (depending on floors and light).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Styleforum › Forums › Culture › Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto › Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata