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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 85

post #1261 of 3754
Thank you, sir! Yes, I imagine some of the items I am looking for are quite common in Denmark, but hard to find here in the US.
post #1262 of 3754
Thank you, I appreciate that.

New design is going to have to prove itself just the same, IMO, and some are doing it successfully such as Bassam Fellows (you see the tractor stool in these magazines often). The Danish masters, Nakashimas, Eames, ect had no easy time becoming what they are, in fact I imagine the Bauhaus designers had an even more difficult time in becoming embraced as they were so dramatically different from what was expected at the time. That is why I build furniture, yet still find room to collect the classics, they have a history that new pieces won't have for many years.
post #1263 of 3754
I know, but danes only want danish design, even the big Italians are rare here, it's only smaller shops focusing on the niche that sells stuff like that.

It's completely different in Sweden, they are way more progressive in their choice of furniture, so it's really up hill when you come with a product not sold by a danish manufacture (even though most danish design is made in Poland now).

I work with a designer who one 2 RedDots this year and a bunch of other prominent awards over that last couple years and even with stuff like this attached to the design, you still have to fight for people to give a shit.
post #1264 of 3754
Oh, I see what you mean. I'm in America, so I see a lot of consumption that spans the full gamut. I agree it takes a lot for a new designer to make waves.
post #1265 of 3754
High end design consumption has turned in to a bandwagon thing and it's shame, why not have something unique and not what the neighbor has.
post #1266 of 3754
I think it does take a very well versed consumer to appreciate something entirely in it's own right, but I also feel that just because a lot of people love something doesn't mean one shouldn't.
post #1267 of 3754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

High end design consumption has turned in to a bandwagon thing and it's shame, why not have something unique and not what the neighbor has.

If everyone were able to eat caviar at every meal...it would still be caviar. I think what you're saying is that there is more to high end design that the piece of furniture. When only few have it there is a certain cachet and when many have it this special club is now open to the public.
post #1268 of 3754
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

I think it does take a very well versed consumer to appreciate something entirely in it's own right, but I also feel that just because a lot of people love something doesn't mean one shouldn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piobaire View Post

If everyone were able to eat caviar at every meal...it would still be caviar. I think what you're saying is that there is more to high end design that the piece of furniture. When only few have it there is a certain cachet and when many have it this special club is now open to the public.

I just get tired of look at the same chair everywhere I go and it ends up being a little like, "ohhh.... you have one those as well" and the excitement of seeing a great piece of design slowly disappear, sort of like living on a street where everyone has a 458 or a Veyron or a Lange Zeitwerk etc.
post #1269 of 3754
I think it's even worse with low-end furniture. I live in a place where Pottery Barn or worse is pretty much the norm, and it all has no meaning whatsoever. Everyone's house looks the same. I've actually been able to find a lot of great Danish furniture (no particular designer, mind you) and some Eames second hand at prices that are a small fraction of the cost of the terrible new furniture available locally.
post #1270 of 3754
Quote:
Originally Posted by zissou View Post

I think it's even worse with low-end furniture. I live in a place where Pottery Barn or worse is pretty much the norm, and it all has no meaning whatsoever. Everyone's house looks the same. I've actually been able to find a lot of great Danish furniture (no particular designer, mind you) and some Eames second hand at prices that are a small fraction of the cost of the terrible new furniture available locally.

Spot on, it reminds me of the intro of the first couple season of weeds, for some reason.



post #1271 of 3754
Lol, ticky-tacky houses. I realize that it is consumed at a high rate, and often due to the knee jerk reaction of seeing someone else do it, but I still look around and see it as a rarity. We're greatly out numbered still, even though it is packed into every design related magazine one can find.

The only peice I have that seems to be tht case is the Noguchi coffee table, where every middle aged house wife in 60 miles seems to fawn over this thing, and their best friend owns one. I haven't found that to be the case with the Danish pieces at the moment, st least in this area they're still owned by people who appreciate them.
post #1272 of 3754
I was surprised to see Modernica on GILT yesterday, and picked up the rocker below. From what I understand, they use the same molds that Herman Miller used for the original fiberglass chairs, so it should for the most part be an exact replica. I've been searching for a single armshell rocker for a while, and the local shop usually only has pairs or sets for sale. Plus, they use Modernica bases anyway. If anyone was considering saving money by buying one of the (terrible) plastic replicas, you should pay just a little more for one of these...



I still have the four side chair shells that need a small table. Can anyone recommend a maple/walnut/laminate table that might look good with them? I'll put either the dowel or eiffel bases on the chairs, depending on what matches the table better. I am looking for something around 36" in diameter.
post #1273 of 3754
Everyone puts them around a saarinen table. I might be tempted to put them around a small round nakashima table.
post #1274 of 3754
I think I am getting sick of mid-century ubiquitous furniture. It is made well but it is furniture from the "wrong" era. It is an era when craftsmanship was replaced with mass-produced design pieces made with a lot of plastic. If you appreciate 'design' and good taste but also want craftsmanship and texture of the material the only way to go is backward , way way back into 19 and 18 century. There you can find a real hand-made personal & beautiful designs. Of course personal education and development of taste is paramount to the task of decorating your home. Sadly most people are idiots and want to surround Saarinen tables with Saarinen chairs or close reproductions and thus keep the mid century shit-wave circling the globe. I am not bashing Saarinen mind you , i think he was one of the last good men but unfortunately his designs are mass-produced and do not require any level of craftsmanship , which makes them paradoxically; ugly pieces. Once you take something beautiful and reproduce it zillion times you render it ubiquitous, predictable, less-special. That is how modern middle-class society destroys everything it touch and renders everything land-fill.
post #1275 of 3754
Quote:
Originally Posted by Medwed View Post

I think I am getting sick of mid-century ubiquitous furniture. It is made well but it is furniture from the "wrong" era. It is an era when craftsmanship was replaced with mass-produced design pieces made with a lot of plastic. If you appreciate 'design' and good taste but also want craftsmanship and texture of the material the only way to go is backward , way way back into 19 and 18 century. There you can find a real hand-made personal & beautiful designs. Of course personal education and development of taste is paramount to the task of decorating your home. Sadly most people are idiots and want to surround Saarinen tables with Saarinen chairs or close reproductions and thus keep the mid century shit-wave circling the globe. I am not bashing Saarinen mind you , i think he was one of the last good men but unfortunately his designs are mass-produced and do not require any level of craftsmanship , which makes them paradoxically; ugly pieces. Once you take something beautiful and reproduce it zillion times you render it ubiquitous, predictable, less-special. That is how modern middle-class society destroys everything it touch and renders everything land-fill.

oh brother.

Zissou, I don't think Modernica uses "the same" molds. The designs simply aren't patent protected anymore (and the patents explain how to produce the furniture), and Modernica makes more faithful knockoffs than other places. I believe the Miller ones were/are hand finished and might use slightly different wood and other materials than the Modernica ones as well. The Modernica Noguchi table definitely looks different to me when compared to an original.
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