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Cool furniture, design objects and desiderata - Page 79

post #1171 of 3471
^I'll agree that they are comfortable, but the one I sat in felt like it would snap at any moment. Personally, I think the fiberglass ones have just the right amount of flex.

Arthur- That's pretty good! You could sell sets of the shells on Ebay for a decent price if you didn't want 14. I do think that the stacking bases are a bit industrial-looking. The Eiffel or dowel bases are much nicer, I think.
post #1172 of 3471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur PE View Post

I have 14 of the vintage ones, the red/orange
got them for nothing
biggrin.gif

people on this forum ridiculed me, lol, said they looked like junk, cheap, etc.
mine are the stackable ones,

send.php?i=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5vZmZpY2VkZXNpZ25zLmNvbS9pbWFnZXMvbWFpbi9lYW1lcy1tb2xkZWQtcGxhc3RpYy1zaWRlLWNoYWlyLmpwZw%3D%3D

I remember that thread. There were only two critiques about your chairs.

mordecai: "Sell them and get something less 'extra chairs for possible overflow at the lecture.'"
and
pocketsquareguy: "I'm not a big fan of the chairs. They remind me of classroom or breakroom chairs."

Both guys making the comments have a pretty established reputation for good taste in design, so it's not like these comments were without some perspective. Frankly, I agree with them. The stackable Eames chairs are made for, well, stacking. Nothing wrong with that, but that just means that they're found most frequently and look appropriate in lecture halls, classrooms, and breakrooms, not in the home. Eames stuff is very functional, so it makes sense to have stacking chairs in a place where you need to stack chairs. That just means they look a little out of place in a residential setting.

I like the Eames molded plastic chairs in the home, just the ones with different bases. I own three different models, and I think they look good for the purpose they serve. I just think that the stacking chairs serve a purpose for an area outside of the home which requires a large number of seats. That's exactly why you found 14 of them.
post #1173 of 3471
Quote:
Originally Posted by zbromer View Post


I remember that thread. There were only two critiques about your chairs.
mordecai: "Sell them and get something less 'extra chairs for possible overflow at the lecture.'"
and
pocketsquareguy: "I'm not a big fan of the chairs. They remind me of classroom or breakroom chairs."
Both guys making the comments have a pretty established reputation for good taste in design, so it's not like these comments were without some perspective. Frankly, I agree with them. The stackable Eames chairs are made for, well, stacking. Nothing wrong with that, but that just means that they're found most frequently and look appropriate in lecture halls, classrooms, and breakrooms, not in the home. Eames stuff is very functional, so it makes sense to have stacking chairs in a place where you need to stack chairs. That just means they look a little out of place in a residential setting.
I like the Eames molded plastic chairs in the home, just the ones with different bases. I own three different models, and I think they look good for the purpose they serve. I just think that the stacking chairs serve a purpose for an area outside of the home which requires a large number of seats. That's exactly why you found 14 of them.

 

 

They are perfect for my needs.  Me and the wife, kids gone, so we use 4 at the table, stack 6 in a closet for when we have folks over, don't take up much space.  Haul them out to the patio if need be.

 

The ones with the wire legs look too fussy, and don't seem as stable (got 2 of them).  The ones with wooden legs look plain wrong to me.

 

Not to mention the price was right.

post #1174 of 3471
That's great that they are functional for you. However, the critique was that they look like chairs typically found outside of a residential setting, which is true. The critique was not that "they looked like junk, cheap, etc." And I certainly don't think people were ridiculing you.
post #1175 of 3471
Quote:
Originally Posted by zbromer View Post

That's great that they are functional for you. However, the critique was that they look like chairs typically found outside of a residential setting, which is true. The critique was not that "they looked like junk, cheap, etc." And I certainly don't think people were ridiculing you.

 

not sure it's 'great' for me, just some chairs

others in the thread seemed to think people were crackin' (remeber that?) on them/me, not that I care

just saying, many people have no idea who/what Eames is, etc.

post #1176 of 3471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur PE View Post

not sure it's 'great' for me, just some chairs
others in the thread seemed to think people were crackin' (remeber that?) on them/me, not that I care
just saying, many people have no idea who/what Eames is, etc.

One person defended them/you. He said, "wow. none of the dudes replying in this thread seem to know much about midcentury design. in case you guys didn't know, those red chairs are the BMW 2002 of the interior design world." His comment was off-base, as the two people who critiqued the chairs actually do know about midcentury design and who the Eameses are.
post #1177 of 3471
Quote:
Originally Posted by zissou View Post

Whatever you guys do, don't buy the new Eames molded plastic chairs. I sat in one the other day, and it felt like those plastic WalMart chairs at the neighbor's BBQ.

They are EVERYWHERE in Scandinavia I think 8 out 10 people I know, have one or more of them completely ridiculous.


The vintage ones are better, but still overdone and they have started to make them again, so it's just a matter of time before, they will become as bad as the plastic ones and ruin the value of the original.
post #1178 of 3471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arthur PE View Post

June 1-11 Herman Miller sale, -15%
may be time to bite the bullet on an Eames lounger

You can get a vintage one, for next to nothing if you have the right connects.

I've seen original 1960's ones go for less than 1000$.
post #1179 of 3471
Anyone know someone on the side who would be willing to deal for Eames HM stuff - want to get some Eames group outdoor chairs and some other stuff and don't want to pay HM list/rape pricing.

140
post #1180 of 3471
Quote:
Originally Posted by Find Finn View Post

You can get a vintage one, for next to nothing if you have the right connects.
I've seen original 1960's ones go for less than 1000$.

Mind you, it's not free to restore them and there is no guarantee that it will be perfect, so you're more realistically looking at $2000-$2500 for one, rstored and you can buy a new one during th hm sale for about $3800
post #1181 of 3471
finally had the chance to sit in a vintage fiberglass Eames shell chair. Surprisingly comfortable, now I want one. Checked out the new HM version and the new plastic versions are not as nice. Anybody have experience with the Modernica fiberglass ones? Supposed they are made with the original molds and everything. Also, the price for a chair with the eifel base is a good $100 less than the HM version.
post #1182 of 3471
They look better than the plastic ones.
post #1183 of 3471
Quote:
Originally Posted by slide13 View Post

finally had the chance to sit in a vintage fiberglass Eames shell chair. Surprisingly comfortable, now I want one. Checked out the new HM version and the new plastic versions are not as nice. Anybody have experience with the Modernica fiberglass ones? Supposed they are made with the original molds and everything. Also, the price for a chair with the eifel base is a good $100 less than the HM version.

Apparently there's to two current plastic version vitra and HM, both made from the same mould (both makes the lounge as well)

Yes, the modernica is the original. the reason why they stopped making the fiberglass one back the day, was that they could reuse fiberglass and they could plastic.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SkinnyGoomba View Post

Mind you, it's not free to restore them and there is no guarantee that it will be perfect, so you're more realistically looking at $2000-$2500 for one, rstored and you can buy a new one during th hm sale for about $3800

No it's not, but a new one retails for over 10k$ here, so it's still a good difference and I really like some of the custom fabric ones i have seen (f.ex. green cord on house), so vintage ones is perfect, also I like my furniture to have patina.
post #1184 of 3471
I was thinking of buying a Lava Lamp.

The ones sold in the US have tacky bases, and sometimes the liquid can get cloudy. The original lava lamps are hand spun and polished in the UK. They also have the more attractive violate/red combo, where as the US only has the violate/orange. They dont ship them to the US, and are wired for the UK.

UK:
astro_lava_lamp_main.jpg
astro_lava_lamp_vr.jpg

US:
2125.jpg


I would have to get it rewired for the US, which would cost about $30. Or I could use a converter, which I have read wastes lots of electricity. I called a local lamp store and was assured that if I got it rewired for the US, it would produce the same amount of heat. Is this true? Anything I should be concerned about?
Edited by Reggs - 6/2/12 at 7:18pm
post #1185 of 3471

Lava's are cool

 

I'm looking for a stabile (mobile on a base, want ~12" high by 16-20" wide

 

found these

http://www.frithmobiles.com/

 

 

 

Wise Guy

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