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The ignorance of others - Page 5

post #61 of 120
Thread Starter 
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And I believe their MTM is done by Samuelsohn, but I could be wrong.
Really? Hmmm, I didn't know that Samuelsohn had factories in upstate NY, which is all the information they would divulge to me.
post #62 of 120
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post #63 of 120
Thread Starter 
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The thing is, it was a fine suit, good looking, fit well, and was a good value for the price. I just don't like being misled.
Me neither. I'd like to be the judge of whether a piece of information is of use to me or not. BTW, I've gotten that "made in our own factories thing as well". In Hong Kong, where there are *lots* of *factories*, I'd believe this. In the States, not so much.
post #64 of 120
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Besides, I don't think even discounters have any legitimate excuse for providing bad service.  Regardless, I don't have any reason to believe discount retail salespeople are 'overworked' in general.  I'm not even sure I know what that means...
It means that its your first day working at one of these discount places, after watching a video that instructs you how to handle a register for a few hours, when you have to handle the christmas crowds alone. I worked at the area responsible for mens furnishing, and nobody ever told me anything that would have made it easier. I had to do it on the fly, and just make it up as I went along. I had to work the register with a long line of people waiting, figure out how to cash a traveler's check, and also go into the back to look for something in a different size. So, yes, I did feel overworked, especially in relation to the pay and the way the managers treated us. There's a reason why service is substandard at these retailers. You're not paying for the service. Don't expect highly trained people and drastic savings at the same time.
post #65 of 120
LAG- didn't remember reading the part about upstate NY... Could also be Hickey Freeman or H. Freeman, but I'm not sure they sub out. BTW Adrian Jules does come very highly recommended.
post #66 of 120
I'm going to chime in on the side of service on this one. It might be quaint and cute to be rude to potential customers but no one has a right to my business. I can buy equal or better quality goods from people who will be nice to me, whether they mean it or not. There have been enough high-end retailers (Sulka, anyone?) go under to serve notice to the rest to play nice and earn my money. AlanC (still in a foul mood from a bad ebay experience...)
post #67 of 120
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(Fashionslave @ 19 Oct. 2004, 07:51) I have actually used Rizzo tailoring on several occasions and concur with your observation that he is considerate,friendly and above all,low pressure.I like the fact that he does not pooh-pooh garments that were not made by him.In fact,he highly praised a vintage Brioni blazer I had him take in commenting that "they don't do detailed tailoring like that today".In respect to his bespoke suits,I think he is more than capable,as many of the high ranking deans and professors from nearby Harvard are clients.Judging from his array of gorgeous cloths from Holland and Holland to Dege to Loro Piana,one would be in good hands.I believe he won the Best of Boston award for tailoring.
Can you pass on a notion of what Rizzo's "house style" is for suits/jackets?
I can wholeheartedly recommend Rizzo & Co. I've known Joe since my grad school days in Cambridge, and I think he's a lovely person -- always kind and courteous. In those days, I was a relatively poor student, and he was always kind and generous in the extreme, giving me free advice on bargains that I'd picked up at Filenes; if Joe gave something a thumbs-down, back to Filenes it went. The comment about Joe being largely responsible for the better-dressed academics at HU is spot on. AT HLS and HBS in particular, it never ceased to amaze me that -- whenever I really admired someone's suit -- Joe was almost always the man responsible. Sometimes I'd mention to Joe a suit that I saw a particular professor wearing and he'd say, "Oh yes... Prof. 'Smith'. ...3B Charcoal, Loro Piana, Super 150s, 9oz." Other times he kid around and tell me, "Oh yes... I used to make a lot of things for him, but since he got married he can no longer afford me." ;-) Great fun... Well, as for the Rizzo & Co. "House Style", that's somewhat hard to answer, as I think Joe can probably make you anything you want. Still, I think it is fair to say that he does have something that I'd akin to a "house style". After I left grad school, I was finally in a position to have Joe make me garments like those that I'd long-admired on others. Judging from the suits and sportcoats that I had made at Rizzo & Co., I'd say the house style is "updated classic", if those words mean anything at all. Joe is Italian, and I would say -- though he's never actually said this to me -- that his influences are more 'Roman' than 'Neapolitan'. To my mind, this makes sense for a Boston clientele (but then again, what do I know about the business end of this obsession of mine...). If you want a good idea of what a "typical" Rizzo & Co. suit looks like, take a good, close look at what John Kerry is wearing when it's important for him to LOOK GOOD [forget this nonsense about Kerry wearing SW; when Kerry needs to LOOK GOOD -- like for the acceptance speech and for the debates -- he wears the suits that Joe has made for him; I'd be willing to bet $$$ that this true...]. JV
post #68 of 120
I think everybody can agree that sales clerks shouldn't be rude to the customers. However, too many customers feel that they have the right to chew down the sales clerk. I saw too many cases of this.
post #69 of 120
unless the sales clerk is extremly rude, or you have a strong relationship with the establishment, there is no reason or justification to chew him out. just leave and take your business elsewhere. there is a good chance that the clerk is doing his best. if the managment feels comfortable employing his, or keeping him in a position that he can't serve you well, then take your business elsewhere.
post #70 of 120
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It means that its your first day working at one of these discount places, after watching a video that instructs you how to handle a register for a few hours, when you have to handle the christmas crowds alone. I worked at the area responsible for mens furnishing, and nobody ever told me anything that would have made it easier. I had to do it on the fly, and just make it up as I went along. I had to work the register with a long line of people waiting, figure out how to cash a traveler's check, and also go into the back to look for something in a different size. So, yes, I did feel overworked, especially in relation to the pay and the way the managers treated us. There's a reason why service is substandard at these retailers. You're not paying for the service. Don't expect highly trained people and drastic savings at the same time.
Well, a holiday/sale shopping experience at a mass retailer is a unique experience.  Though even in those instances, there's no excuse for not having sufficient staff to handle customers' inquiries.   And there's certainly no excuse for rudeness or inattentiveness.  I might understand a store being occasionally understaffed, or a salesperson being tied up with another customer and not able to get to me right away, but at least ACKNOWLEDGE ME.  Look in my direction, and say, "I'm sorry, I'll be with you as soon as I can...," or something.  How difficult is that? Edited to clarify: that frustration wasn't directed at YOU, Christian.  
post #71 of 120
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post #72 of 120
No worries, LeoJay. Its just your comments had a hint of superiority that a lot of today's customers seem to have. Honestly, you have to blame managment. I always wondered how people who had been working there for years didn't know anything about the products other than how to work the register. It seems that they are always switching people around from department to department. So, somebody might be working in women's clothes for awhile will get moved to a unrelated department. I'll admit that I wasn't good at all. I didn't know how to measure people, or if the suit was a proper fit. After a few weeks, I got the hang of it. All I needed was somebody to pull me aside and show me all that stuff for twenty minutes. But, managers would get really pissy if they see you talking to other associates.
post #73 of 120
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No worries, LeoJay. Its just your comments had a hint of superiority that a lot of today's customers seem to have. Honestly, you have to blame managment. I always wondered how people who had been working there for years didn't know anything about the products other than how to work the register. It seems that they are always switching people around from department to department. So, somebody might be working in women's clothes for awhile will get moved to a unrelated department. I'll admit that I wasn't good at all. I didn't know how to measure people, or if the suit was a proper fit. After a few weeks, I got the hang of it. All I needed was somebody to pull me aside and show me all that stuff for twenty minutes. But, managers would get really pissy if they see you talking to other associates.
Superiority? Really? Expecting to be acknowledged? If that's a sign of a superior attitude these days, then it's no wonder customers like me get so frustrated. For my part, I wasn't even addressing 'expertise' -- I'm just talking about common sense good business practices, and quite frankly, common courtesy.
post #74 of 120
I was talking about when you doubted if sales people in the holiday crush were 'overworked.' I don't disagree with common courtesy.
post #75 of 120
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I remember a story from Style and the Man. From memory, it went something like this. A guy goes into the Andover shop and orders a few custom (or MTM) suits. Davidson is a little distant, but takes the order. Weeks go by, and the customer never hears from the shop. He calls, and always gets the runaround. The thing is, Davidson won't start the order. When one of the salesmen asks Davidson why, he says, "I don't like the cut of that guy's jib." Finally, the customer demands to speak to Davidson, gets him on the phone, and chews him out. Davidson laughes, hangs up, and places the order. The customer had passed some sort of mysterious test, and been admitted to the club. Flusser cites this as proof of Davidson's unique charm, and of the store's special atmosphere. I interpret that anecdote ... differently.
I don't remember that story. However, with that in mind, if I ever go back into the Andover Shop, I'll not think twice about jumping over his not terrific display of sweaters and giving him a good slap upside the head, should Charlie show me any attitude. My mistake, I now see, was that I thought twice about it the first time around. I looks as though I'm not going to be in the club. My loss.
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