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Are you a bad tipper? - Page 6

post #76 of 234
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Some parents I know claim that they have to take their children because they cannot get babysitters - I imagine that they have neither cellar or lockable garden shed, then.
Old VB: you've got to be my favorite wit on SF. H.
post #77 of 234
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I get a little tired of hearing people bitch about children at restaurants.  I understand they can cause a disturbance, but I'm sure we all, at some point, disturbed others as well.
Actually, no. My parents and (and it seems) other diner's never tolerated bad behavior. Either at home or out. I remember being taken to Lutece, to the Harvard Club, to the Savoy in London, and I never acted up. Now that I am older, it's a different story.
post #78 of 234
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(hopkins_student @ Feb. 09 2005,09:01) I get a little tired of hearing people bitch about children at restaurants.  I understand they can cause a disturbance, but I'm sure we all, at some point, disturbed others as well.
Not me.  I wouldn't have dared to misbehave in a restaurant when I was small.   Parents should just remove their children when they misbehave rather than continuing to inflict them on others.  Presumably they chose to breed, so should take the responsibility that comes with children.   It's the way that parents either find the toe-curling antics of their spawn amusing (and think we all should), or just ignore them that grips me.
There was a child on a recent TransAtlantic flight, I cannot remember the airline, that kept running up and down the aisle, punching every seat back. Finally, after the fourth time, I told the child (politely yet firmly) to behave himself and sit down. The father came up to me and called me, in front of his young son (who was maybe 4 or 5) an asshole. The stewardess escorted him away.
post #79 of 234
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I cannot even understand why people take young children at all, never mind try to comprehend their lack of parental guidance when they are there.
Perhaps because they love their children and want to spend time with them?  Maybe they've been working all day and haven't had a chance to spend time with their children, and when they get home they don't necessarily want to cook? The people that I know that complain the most about children in restaurants are people that were raised by nannies or other paid assistants while their parents were out partying.  On a side note, these are also usually not the most well adjusted individuals.
I've three children. They all behave. While we had some help, we did the majority of the work. I wouldn't brook bullshit from screaming kids, least of all my own. One the rare occasions when my children had acted up, I'd leave the restaurant with one, talk to him or her outside, and come back in. Everything would be swell from then on out. Your implication (or outright statement rather) about "loving children" is sort of laughable.
post #80 of 234
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2) Excessive scrutiny of semantics as a means of keeping change in your own wallet is at the very least passé.
I don't want to engage this particular post as much as I want to engage this sentiment in general as I've seen on this board. I love this: one tries to refine or discern meaning or clearly state something and one is accused of being a semantician.
post #81 of 234
I don't think there's an issue with taking your kids to, say... Denny's or even Red Robin or some place like that, but once you start taking children to higher end restaurants, you run a serious risk of disturbing other diners, and IMO they shouldn't be allowed. I'm not sure what their policies are, but I almost never have seen children in any of the finer dining establishments that I patronize.
post #82 of 234
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(Styleman @ Feb. 10 2005,14:05) 2) Excessive scrutiny of semantics as a means of keeping change in your own wallet is at the very least passé.
I don't want to engage this particular post as much as I want to engage this sentiment in general as I've seen on this board. I love this:  one tries to refine or discern meaning or clearly state something and one is accused of being a semantician.
I think you should have the courtesy to quote the right person; I did not say that. Yet you quoted me somehow.
post #83 of 234
Horace, I'm glad you find my statement "laughable". It is the unfeelingness towards children that has been expressed by some that bothers me. Honestly, I have been disturbed by adults in restaurants at least as often as I have been disturbed by children. I see no reason why children should be singled out in reference to creating disturbances.
post #84 of 234
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(Horace @ Feb. 12 2005,09:46)
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Originally Posted by Styleman,Feb. 10 2005,14:05
2) Excessive scrutiny of semantics as a means of keeping change in your own wallet is at the very least passé.
I don't want to engage this particular post as much as I want to engage this sentiment in general as I've seen on this board. I love this:  one tries to refine or discern meaning or clearly state something and one is accused of being a semantician.
I think you should have the courtesy to quote the right person; I did not say that. Yet you quoted me somehow.
Sorry -- I have a very bad tendency to mistakenly shift around stuff in my reply -- deleting some things and retaining others.
post #85 of 234
Hopkins, Some environments are adult ones and not meant for children, and higher end restaurants are one of those. Most people realize this and leave their children at home, others do not, and this is IMO bad for both the children (who find it boring and tedious) and both the adults in question, and others in the area. IMO people need to understand what environments are appropriate for their children, and which are not.
post #86 of 234
Well said Sir.
post #87 of 234
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Hopkins, Some environments are adult ones and not meant for children, and higher end restaurants are one of those.  Most people realize this and leave their children at home, others do not, and this is IMO bad for both the children (who find it boring and tedious) and both the adults in question, and others in the area.  IMO people need to understand what environments are appropriate for their children, and which are not.
this is a hard call - I would agree that at the very high end kids have no place, and even in the middle (and, sorry to put a number on this but lets say high end being >80 and middle >50 bucks a head, without wine) kids need to behave as well as adults. but I think that there is an advantage both to the family and to the child to be included in resteraunts like this. I take my son to most places we go - he has been to a czech modern ballet, and to good resteraunts in several cities in europe, as well as lot of places that are more, say traditionaly accepting of children in the american spirit. if he makes any noise, we zip him outside. but I want him to get used to how to act in these places.
post #88 of 234
I'm a server, and cannot believe how naive many of you are to the trials and tribulations the profession often entails. If you get good service, tip 18-20%. If you get service that's above and beyond, tip more. 15% should be left for mediocre service, less than that for terrible service. It's shocking how quick people are to deduct from the tip, and how reticent they are towards boosting it. FYI, your food coming late, overdone, etc. is usually the kitchen's fault, and WILL be corrected, and often with a bonus or compensation on the mangers' part to boot. A tip is based on server performance. I make $2.13 an hour, and the arrogance and readiness to deduct from my livelihood that some of you demonstrate, especially regarding aspects beyond my control, is appalling.
post #89 of 234
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I'm a server, and cannot believe how naive many of you are to the trials and tribulations the profession often entails.   If you get good service, tip 18-20%.  If you get service that's above and beyond, tip more.  15% should be left for mediocre service, less than that for terrible service.  It's shocking how quick people are to deduct from the tip, and how reticent they are towards boosting it.
Who's naive? This is not an established guideline for patrons of restaurants. Whether it should be, or you would like it to be, is immaterial; it simply is not the established scheme. 15% is considered reasonable by most tipping guides, and more importantly by most patrons, for adequate service with no serious mistakes. I don't mean this to sound rude, but if you don't like that, you can either start a mass media campaign to inform us all on the new rules, or find another line of work that pays better. You cannot, however, expect the ordinary person to 'know' this or follow it; nor can you rightly feel slighted when he does not.
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FYI, your food coming late, overdone, etc. is usually the kitchen's fault, and WILL be corrected, and often with a bonus or compensation on the mangers' part to boot.
No, it WILL NOT necessarily be corrected; it often is not corrected in my experience, and if it is the kitchen's fault the server needs to get the manager and have these corrections or compensations made. It should not be our job as patrons to seek out compensation for deficiencies in the expected service. If you get a bad tip when you don't seek the manager's help in correcting the patron's experience, you deserve it. It's a difficult job, I know, and I wouldn't want it. But complaining about the way it IS is ridiculous. I don't do that job because I know the way it is, and I wouldn't be able to handle it especially for the amount of money I would make. All that being said, I am a very good patron, typically tip over 20% for adequate but not intrusive service, and don't ask much of my server. But I am not going to reward mediocre service with a good tip.
post #90 of 234
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I'm a server, and cannot believe how naive many of you are to the trials and tribulations the profession often entails.   If you get good service, tip 18-20%.  If you get service that's above and beyond, tip more.  15% should be left for mediocre service, less than that for terrible service.  It's shocking how quick people are to deduct from the tip, and how reticent they are towards boosting it. FYI, your food coming late, overdone, etc. is usually the kitchen's fault, and WILL be corrected, and often with a bonus or compensation on the mangers' part to boot.  A tip is based on server performance.  I make $2.13 an hour, and the arrogance and readiness to deduct from my livelihood that some of you demonstrate, especially regarding aspects beyond my control, is appalling.
I agree and disagree, if the service is superb, I will definitely tip highly, and I do not base the tip on the service of the kitchen as much as the friendliness and care offered by the server, however I do not think 15% is warranted for ok or mediocre service either. I think it is a travesty what a server is paid as a base wage, if the minimum was say 3.85, I think attitudes would be better when a cheap-scape leaves a bad tip, knowing that with optimal service to the next customer one could be redeemed. For exceptional service I will try to lend myself to the 22%-25% range, rather good service the 17%-21% range, average service with a little more attention 15%, but mediocre 10%. I really will not comment on below that, but, I believe the service comes partly from the attitude and presence of the customer, I try to emit a friendly non-combative personality toward the server where he feels more a part of my dining experience than just a slave as many patrons treat waiters. It seems to make the whole experience more forth coming for all, and tends to bring better service as well. Rarely do I leave less then 20%....but I still do not tip the PIZZA GUY......
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